Archive for the ‘Duende’ Tag

Honey Bee On Arizona Fleabane — Digital Art   Leave a comment

Arizona Fleabane & Bee (1 of 1) art blogHoney Bee On Arizona Fleabane — Digital Art by kenne

my nature photos
masking layers of art filters
creating my art

digital painting
colors become transparent
blending together

i have become a
digital photo artist
uniting my hands

whatever my tools
technology empowers
the will and desire

i seek to be good
i seek to communicate
not to be perfect

i seek the duende
to find my kindred feelings
in all that I do

 

— kenne

Another Music Sunday — Danny Gatton   Leave a comment

Little known, except by musicians, Danny Gatton was a musician’s musician. He loved playing the telecaster, rebuilding antique cars, staying around the D.C. area and just being a shy “good-old boy.”

Danny Gatton has been described as possessing an extraordinary proficiency on his instrument, “a living treasury of American musical styles.” In 2009, John Previti, who played bass guitar with Danny for 18 years stated: “You know, when he played country music, it sounded like all he played was country music. When he played jazz, it sounded like that’s all he played, rockabilly, old rock and roll, soul music. You know, he called himself a Whitman sampler of music Legendary guitarist Steve Vai reckons Danny “comes closer than anyone else to being the best guitar player that ever lived.” Accomplished guitar veteran Albert Lee said of Gatton: “Here’s a guy who’s got it all.”

Gatton shot himself in his garage, October 4, 1994 at the young age of 59 — he left no explanation. All great artists seem to possess a spooky fatalism, a sense of the duende down deep in the soul.

The goblets
of the dawn break.
The crying of the guitar
starts.
No use to stop it.
It is impossible
to stop it.

— Federico Garcia Lorca

 

Pondering The Duende   1 comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPondering the Duende — Image by kenne

I write not because of an ability,
but because of an inspiration, a magic, a fire inside
that garners an alliance with my demons and angels.

“Thus duende is a power and not a behavior,
it is a struggle and not a concept.

I have heard an old master guitarist say:
‘Duende is not in the throat;
duende surges up from the soles of the feet.’

Which means it is not a matter of ability,
but of real live form;

of blood;
of ancient culture;
of creative action.”

— Federico Garcia Lorca

#####

conversations lost

conversations
from the past
lost
in the images
of memories
amassed
only to return
on the backs
of death
resurrected
by poets
serving only
to introduce
images
of what was
like water
returning
from a fountain’s
reservoir
only
to be reborn
again
and again
and again

— kenne

Trails Leading To The Most Amazing Views   1 comment

sunset (1 of 1)-3 blogTrails leading to a world as in Federico Garcia Lorca’s “waltzing, sexy, high-spirited, deathward-leaning proclamations of love.”
— Image by kenne

May all your trails be crooked,

winding, lonesome, dangerous,

leading to the most amazing view,

where something strange and more beautiful

and more full of wonder than

your deepest dreams waits for you.

—Edward Abbey

Invoking the Mystery, Revisited   Leave a comment

Sunrise On The trail (1 of 1) art III blogInvoking the Mystery By Giving Of One’s Time — Computer Painting by kenne

 (The following was first posted September 26, 2009 on this blog. In the process of writing about my dear friend, Linda Ricketts, who passed away recent, I was doing a tab search on this blog when this posting was among those identified. Much has happen in the intervening years that make the premise of “Invoking the Mystery” even more important and timely, especially with Supreme Court’s deeply flawed 2010 decision in Citizens United.)

The book club to which I belong, “The Society of the 5th Cave,” is made up of members, all-be-it old educated professionals, males who pride themselves in being specialists in many areas, but with age accepting reality of being skilled in few. Mostly politically right of center seeking to help me see the light, convinced that those with opposing views are also conducting their own act of ministry.  Wrong, oh truthsayers! Although I may debate a position, I don’t want everyone to agree with me, I just want each person to think. That’s way lifeincsquare-thumb-500x501-20151I selected Life Inc. How The World Became A Corporation And How To Take It Back by Douglas Rushkoff for September reading. (Click here to see Rushkoff on Colbert Nation.) It is a book that can help people better understand the many of today’s economic and financial issues, which Rushkoff feels are not a problem of reality or nature, but a problem of design. Are corporations evil? No! Neither are the people who work within their controlling environments. There is a convincing case to be made for redesigning a poorly designed invention of our culture by identifying non-market ways of developing gift-exchange institutions.

mcd_us_high_9_25We humanize the corporation, so much so that for many who may take a road-trip vacation, tend to seek out a McDonald’s in which to eat, rather than going to a local establish. If this is your comfort level, then you don’t want to be traveling between the tiny Dakotan hamlets of Meadow and Glad Valley. This is where, according to Stephen Von Worley on the Weather Sealed blog, you will be hurtin’ is you suffer a Big Mac Attack.

Most of us are products of the corporate mentally and lifestyle. I have worked hard to get to an age where I’ve collected enough assets to make money by having money.  Even though recognizing that my live and my fortune is controlled and manipulated by our corporate state, I’m now working hard becoming part of the gift economy – doing something for nothing and stop behaving like corporations who “… express charitable and community impulses from afar.” A gift economy is a society where the exchange of goods and services are given without any explicit agreement for immediate or future rewards.

“By donating to charities in the same manner as our corporate equivalents, we succumb to the proxy system that dissocializes in the first place.”  Instead, we can start reclaiming what has been lost, by accepting that small is the new big and that through a highly networked world we can begin making local impacts that it spreads. Rushkoff gives many examples of local sustainable efforts that effectively trickle up in profound ways. The more we network doing something for nothing, the more one voluntary act encourages another. The act of giving is a social phenomenon that should be a fundamental life skill. As Walt Whitman wrote in Carol of Words:  “The gift is to the giver, and comes back most to him – it cannot fail.”

Rushkroff’s belief that commerce has been separated from the people who are doing the stuff Gift_us_newand his reference to the gift economy brought to mind Lewis Hyde’s wonderful book, The Gift – Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World. Written over twenty-seven years ago, his insight and guidance is even more apropos given today’s economic and financial challenges. Here is how Hyde summarizes The Gift:

“The main assumption of the book is that certain spheres of life, which we care about, are not well organized by the marketplace. That includes artistic practice, which is what the book is mostly about, but also pure science, spiritual life, healing and teaching….This book is about the alternative economy of artistic practice. For most artists, the actual working life of art does not fit well into a market economy, and this book explains why and builds out on the alternative, which is to imagine the commerce of art to be well described by gift exchange.”

In his chapter titled “The Labor of Gratitude,” Hyde uses the folk tale, “The Shoemaker and the Elves,” a tale of a gifted person, as a model of the labor of gratitude. In the tale, the shoemaker makes his first pair of shoes in order to dress the elves, which is the last act in his labor of gratitude. When Hyde speaks of labor, he is referring to human endeavor such as “writing a poem, raising a child, developing a new calculus, resolving a neurosis, invention in all forms,” as distinguished from “work,” that we do by the hour. Labor has it’s own schedule. Things are accomplished, but often we as if wasn’t us who did them. This is always a bit mysterious. It is the mystery Federico Garcia Lorca was referring to when he wrote at the bottom of one of his drawings he did in Buenos Aires, “Only mystery enables us to live.” Invoking the mystery is to invoke the duende.

If we value the mystery and the categories of human enterprise that invoke the mystery, such as family life, spiritual life, public service, pure science and artistic practice, none of which operates well in the corporate market place, then it is necessary that we find non-corporate ways to organize and support them.

kenne

Morning Passion   2 comments

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMorning Passion — Images by kenne

MORNING PASSION

Lorca’s mode of thought
The demon and the angel
Living the duende.

— kenne

Between Light And Shadows — Making Something Visible That Might Otherwise Be Invisible   6 comments

"Morning Sun" Painting by Edward Hopper

“Morning Sun” Painting by Edward Hopper

Life and art are defined by what lies between light and shadows. In Holland Cotter’s April 30, 2007 article in the New York Times, he wrote “A certain slant of light was Edward Hopper’s thing. And he made it our thing, hard-wired it into our American brains:”

Every since seeing Edward Hopper’s, “Nighthawks” at the Art Institute of Chicago, as a young man, I have been seduced by his work — not because he hard-wired my brain, but because of the human ability to distinguish between an object and its background. It is the contrast between light and shadows that catches the eye, which is why Hopper’s work is so seductive — it the essence of the “Hopper Effect: the impression of everyday life touched with secular sanctity. “

Poet L.E. Sissman was so captivated by Hopper’s work that he wrote “American Light: A Hopper Retrospective”. Written in five parts, the first part subtitled, “Hopper”.

A man, a plan, a spandrel touched with fire,
A morning-tinted cornice, a lit spire,
A clapboard gable beetled with the brow-
Shadows of lintels, a glazed vacancy
In shut-up shopfronts, an ineffably
Beautiful emptiness of sunlight in
Bare rooms of which he was the sole inhabitant:
The morning and the evening of his life
Rotated, a lone sun, about the plinth
On which he stood in granite, limned by light
That lasted on day long and then went out.

Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks"

Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”

Yes, it’s all about what falls between the light and the shadows, as Joyce Carol Oats writes on Hopper’s “Nighthawks” in Transforming Vision – Writers on Art:

The three men are fully clothed, long sleeves,
even hats, though it’s indoors, and brightly lit,
and there’s a women. The woman is wearing
a short-sleeved red dress cut to expose her arms,
a curve of her creamy chest; she’s contemplating
a cigarette in her right hand, thinking that
her companion has finally left his wife but
can she trust him? Her heavy-lidded eyes,
pouty lipsticked mouth, she has the redhead’s
true pallor like skill milk, damned good-looking
and she guesses she knows it but what exactly
has it gotten her so far, and where? — he’ll start
to feel guilty in a few days, she knows
the signs, an actual smell, sweaty, rancid, like
dirty socks; he’ll slip away to make telephone calls. . .

“. . . People the vacuum with American light.” — the last line in T.S. Sissman’s poem on Edward Hopper.

“There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s fears and the summit of his knowledge…” — Rod Serling, Twilight Zone.

I feel that in the images I capture, I’m always trying to capture that middle ground between light and shadow — maybe Edward Hopper was too.

Some may think of the space between light and the shadow as the twilight zone, I think of it as what the Spanish poet Federico García Lorca called duende, which as Edward Hirsch has put it, “. . . it makes something visible that might otherwise be invisible, that has been swimming under the surface all along.”

kenne

Desert Fall ShadowsBetween Light and Shadows — Image by kenne

 

“. . . From Where I Sit, Rust Looks Pretty Good”   3 comments

Christmas 2012Old Rusty Tractor — Image by kenne

Last night I spent over three hours watching the documentary, “History of The Eagles.” I love every minute of it!

The documentary, which had its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last January, is in two parts and is currently on Showtime and can be purchased on DVD, or streamed — there are so many options in today’s digital would.

Like most rock ‘n roll bands, much of their creativity comes from the battles with their demons, which are the vital spirits of creative imagination. For me their music takes the listener to an extrasensory event that is seeking Lorca’s “Duende,” ” . . a momentary burst of inspiration, the blush of all that is alive, all that the performer is creating at a certain moment.” This is what makes music intoxicating.

So, “What’s with the rusty old tractor?” you ask.

One of the things that stood out the most in the Eagles documentary was something Don Henley said near the end, when he referenced a Neil Young quote about quitting before you rust. The reference was about music, or was it?

Most of us who have lived with the music of the Eagles are beginning to feel old and rusty, but Henley put a new perspective on it:

“I don’t see rust as a bad thing. I have an old 1962 John Deere tractor that’s covered in rust, but it runs like a top. You know the inner workings are just fine. To me, that rust symbolizes all the work done and all the experiences gained. From where I sit, rust looks pretty good.”

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before
“Relax, ” said the night man,
“We are programmed to receive.
You can check-out any time you like,
But you can never leave! “

— from the Eagles, “Hotel California”

kenne

12artsbeat-eagles-blog480Glenn Fry and Don Henley of The Eagles — Sam Jones/Showtime

One of the best covers of an Eagles song is that of Tucson native, Linda Ronstadt – Desperado (Simple Dreams Tour – Atlanta 1977)

Dancing Water Muses   3 comments

Tucson Folk Festival 2013

ever festivalTucson Folk Festival 2013
has dancing muses

dancing
because that’s what they do —

I know, I was there
feeling the energy

creative energy 
calling
the dancing muse

she appears
always colorful,
always free

not confined
to life’s rules

an expression of life
streaming
feelings of Duende

down the centuries
from the ancient muse,
Terpsichore

we drink
the playful spirit

delighting
a perpetual thirst

plucking the chords
inside the soul

— kenne

Tucson Folk Festival 2013Images Captured At The Tucson Fold Festival by kenne

 

Deciphering Visible And Hidden Meanings.   1 comment

Thanksgiving 2012 OceansideBride & Bridesmaids On Oceanside Pier — Image by kenne

Some may call me a photographer,
having an eye for the moment
always looking for the duende.

Catching the edge of life
creating a visual narrative
of what was, what is and will be.

Every moment I capture
starts a journey from
what I found to what found me.

Many layers blending together
shaping a visual attitude
as of my mind’s eye —

Poetry without words,
an expression of existence
in life’s fleeting moments.

Looking for photos within a photo
Catching what others see
Through their camera’s eye.

Having a camera is not
a photographer to be
without being drunk with life —

A passion to do something
without knowing what or why,
making the invisible, visible.

Forming a communication circuit
laminating a soulful spirit
linking an image with viewer —

As with Klee’s quirky angels
where we try deciphering
visible and hidden meanings.

kenne

Thanksgiving 2012 Oceanside“View From Above” — Image by kenne

 

Sacred Datura As Teacher   3 comments

Sacred Datura — Image by kenne

Sacred Datura As Teacher

 

The trumpets blow
In the rite of passage
Near the desert stream

White and lavender-tinted
Colors known to the Shaman
To purity the soul

Datura is the sacred
In Carlos Castaneda’s
Supernormal perceptual state

Real or imagined
Around the Sonoran
Mountains and desert

Having a chance encounter
With a mushroom hunter
Influenced by diablero

The journey begins
In the rituals of Datura
Taking flight as a crow

Opening the doors
Wide into the night
Welcoming the duende

Freeing the poet
Of habitual trains of thought
Bringing love and understanding

Enhanced by the occasional
Encounter with black coyote
Ensuring the diablero’s existence

kenne

Sacred Datura As Teacher — Image by kenne

Drinking From The Duende Vessel   1 comment

“The Duende Vessel” — Image by kenne

Drinking from the

Duende vessel

is to be charmed —

charmed

by its danger,

bringing forth

inspiration,

magic,

and fire from the

very darkness

of my soul. 

— kenne

Posted May 30, 2012 by kenneturner in Art, Information, Life, Poetry

Tagged with ,

Will the Society of the 5th Cave Invoke the Mystery?   Leave a comment

The book club to which I belong, “The Society of the 5th Cave,” is made up of members, all-be-it old educated professionals, males who pride themselves in being specialists in many areas, but with age accepting reality of being skilled in few. Mostly politically right of center seeking to help me see the light, convinced that those with opposing views are also conducting their own act of ministry.  Wrong, oh truthsayers! Although I may debate a position, I don’t want everyone to agree with me, I just want each person to think. That’s way lifeincsquare-thumb-500x501-20151I selected Life Inc. How The World Became A Corporation And How To Take It Back by Douglas Rushkoff for September reading. (Click here to see Rushkoff on Colbert Nation.) It is a book that can help people better understand the many of today’s economic and financial issues, which Rushkoff feels are not a problem of reality or nature, but a problem of design. Are corporations evil? No! Neither are the people who work within their controlling environments. There is a convincing case to be made for redesigning a poorly designed invention of our culture by identifying non-market ways of developing gift-exchange institutions.

mcd_us_high_9_25We humanize the corporation, so much so that for many who may take a road-trip vacation, tend to seek out a McDonald’s in which to eat, rather than going to a local establish. If this is your comfort level, then you don’t want to be traveling between the tiny Dakotan hamlets of Meadow and Glad Valley. This is where, according to Stephen Von Worley on the Weather Sealed blog, you will be hurtin’ is you suffer a Big Mac Attack.

Most of us are products of the corporate mentally and lifestyle. I have worked hard to get to an age where I’ve collected enough assets to make money by having money.  Even though recognizing that my live and my fortune is controlled and manipulated by our corporate state, I’m now working hard becoming part of the gift economy – doing something for nothing and stop behaving like corporations who “… express charitable and community impulses from afar.” A gift economy is a society where the exchange of goods and services are given without any explicit agreement for immediate or future rewards.

“By donating to charities in the same manner as our corporate equivalents, we succumb to the proxy system that dissocializes in the first place.”  Instead, we can start reclaiming what has been lost, by accepting that small is the new big and that through a highly networked world we can begin making local impacts that it spreads. Rushkoff gives many examples of local sustainable efforts that effectively trickle up in profound ways. The more we network doing something for nothing, the more one voluntary act encourages another. The act of giving is a social phenomenon that should be a fundamental life skill. As Walt Whitman wrote in Carol of Words:  “The gift is to the giver, and comes back most to him – it cannot fail.”

Rushkroff’s belief that commerce has been separated from the people who are doing the stuff Gift_us_newand his reference to the gift economy brought to mind Lewis Hyde’s wonderful book, The GiftCreativity and the Artist in the Modern World. Written over twenty-seven years ago, his insight and guidance is even more apropos given today’s economic and financial challenges. Here is how Hyde summarizes The Gift:

“The main assumption of the book is that certain spheres of life, which we care about, are not well organized by the marketplace. That includes artistic practice, which is what the book is mostly about, but also pure science, spiritual life, healing and teaching….This book is about the alternative economy of artistic practice. For most artists, the actual working life of art does not fit well into a market economy, and this book explains why and builds out on the alternative, which is to imagine the commerce of art to be well described by gift exchange.”

In his chapter titled “The Labor of Gratitude,” Hyde uses the folk tale, “The Shoemaker and the Elves,” a tale of a gifted person, as a model of the labor of gratitude. In the tale, the shoemaker makes his first pair of shoes in order to dress the elves, which is the last act in his labor of gratitude. When Hyde speaks of labor, he is referring to human endeavor such as “writing a poem, raising a child, developing a new calculus, resolving a neurosis, invention in all forms,” as distinguished from “work,” that we do by the hour. Labor has it’s own schedule. Things are accomplished, but often we as if wasn’t us who did them. This is always a bit mysterious. It is the mystery Federico Garcia Lorca was referring to when he wrote at the bottom of one of his drawings he did in Buenos Aires, “Only mystery enables us to live.” Invoking the mystery is to invoke the duende.

If we value the mystery and the categories of human enterprise that invoke the mystery, such as family life, spiritual life, public service, pure science and artistic practice, none of which operates well in the corporate market place, then it is necessary that we find non-corporate ways to organize and support them.

kenne

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