Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Cooper’s Hawk Painting   Leave a comment

Sabino Canyon 06-09-12Cooper’s Hawk — Computer Painting by kenne

 

Hiking In The Catalina Mountains   Leave a comment

Hutch's PoolWest Fork Trail Leaving Hutch’s Pool — Panorama Image by kenne

“Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you’re no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn’t just a means to an end but a unique event in itself. This leaf has jagged edges. This rock looks loose. To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain which sustain life, not the top. Here’s where things grow.

But of course, without the top, you can’t have any sides. It’s the top that defines the sides. So on we go—we have a long way—no hurry—just one step after the next—with a little Chautauqua for entertainment. Mental reflection is so much more interesting than TV it’s a shame more people don’t switch over to it. They probably think what they hear is unimportant, but it never is.”

― from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values by Robert M. Pirsig 

 

A Home In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Ned's Nature Walk -- 01-1-09-13Cactus Wren Nest in a Cholla (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

The whole theory of the universe
is directed unerringly to one individual
– namely You.

— Walt Whitman

Standing At The Altar Of Nature   Leave a comment

SCVN Day 1Naturalist David Lazaroff and several other naturalists with the 2011 SCVN Training Class, Day 1 — Image by kenne

I was a member of the 2011 Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) class. During the fall training I wrote the following poem, posting it on this blog:

STANDING AT THE ALTAR OF NATURE 

When we stand
at the altar of nature,
we stand with the greats;
Ralph Waldo Emerson,
Henry David Thoreau,
and John Muir,
each having helped define
our relationship
with nature and language –
“every natural fact is a symbol
of some spiritual fact,
. . . words are signs of natural facts.”

Nature’s beauty becomes
a source of spiritual energy
connecting all things
into a universal whole
with the energy of our
thoughts and will.

We stand at nature’s altar
not separate from her,
seeing her in the flowers,
insects, animals, mountains,
creating a unified landscape
of our inward and outward senses.

Like all relationships,
the experience depends
on the degree of harmony
between us and nature,
therefore becoming a gift
granted while walking with nature
as she is embraced in our minds –
Enlighten, she shares her secrets,
making the universe more “transparent.”
Yet the gift may only offer a glimpse,
to be shared in images and words,
charming all living things.

Commenting on my poem, SCVN member, Walt Tornow, wrote that my poem  ”. . . captures beautifully my feelings about being in the mountains.” He went on to share the following:

GOD, GRACE, AND GRATITUDE

Finding God in the wilderness …

  • The majesty of our mountains, the magnificence of views/ vistas they afford, and the splendor and munificence of the many gifts that nature has to offer
  • The awe and humility that comes from being witness to the grandeur of it all, juxtaposed with realizing the relative smallness and fleetingness of  our existence
  • Never feeling or being alone … lots of company by nature’s creatures, and taking in the beauty of nature’s show
  • Feeling vulnerable, yet trusting, being in the wilderness — potential prey to wildlife, and exposed to the elements
  • Experiencing awe, joy and inspiration by being here
  • Feeling connected … becoming one with myself, with nature, and the universe
  • Finding peace, serenity, and sense of holiness … my place of worship and meditation

 

Here for the grace of God am I …

Grateful to be, to be here, and be given the opportunity and capacity to enjoy the many gifts/ blessings around me.

– Walt Tornow

If you feel our passion for nature, we want to share it with you by inviting you to become a Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist.

We are currently recruiting people who share our passion for nature
to take part in our 2017 SCVN Training Class from the beginning of October to January.

After completing the training you will start next January teaching kindergarten and/or elementary students approximately 1 morning per week. All training curriculum materials provide for an excellent learning experience, along with many guest nature experts.

Additionally, you can take part in adult Public Interpretations nature programs about Sabino Canyon.

You can learn more about this wonderful volunteer nature program and get an application by visiting our website 

www.sabinonaturalists.org/

Please pass on this information on to persons you will be interested in becoming an SCVN member. Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have — kenneturner@gmail.com

kenne

Strike It RichNaturalist, Gwen Swanson, demonstrates “panning” to students in the “Strike It Rich” program.
This creekside activity allows children to learn about the difference between rocks and minerals
by panning for garnets in the sand along Sabino Creek, and the importance of water in forming the canyon.
Image by kenne

SCVN Nature Walk #1SCVN Training nature walk with naturalist, Bill Kaufman (Fall 2011) — Image by kenne

Warming Up On A Cool Desert Morning   Leave a comment

roadrunner-warming-in-the-sun-1413-1-blogA Greater Roadrunner Warming Up On A Cool Desert Morning — Image by kenne

When the bird and the book disagree, believe the bird.

— John James Audubon

Bird On A Limb   1 comment

female-phainopepla-0296-art-blogBird On A Limb (Female Phainopepla) — Computer Art by kenne

“Be like the bird who,
halting in her flight
on a limb too slight,
yet sings, knowing she has wings.”

— Victor Hugo

Praying Mantis Egg Casing   2 comments

Praying Mantis egg casing (1 of 1) blog II.jpgPraying Mantis Egg Casing on a Mesquite Limb in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

This Styrofoam-like mass was created by a female praying mantis to protect a mass of 200-400 eggs. This egg case is called an ootheca. Females typically lay their eggs in the fall. Tiny mantid nymphs will hatch from their eggs while still inside the egg case and make their way out of the ootheca approximately three months later.

— kenne

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