Archive for the ‘Sonoran Desert’ Category

Sonoran Desert Mushrooms   1 comment

Sonoran Desert Mushrooms — Images by kenne

Podaxis is a genus of secotioid fungi in the family Agaricaceae. Species, which have the appearance of a “stalked-puffball”,
have a worldwide distribution, and tend to be found growing solitary or scattered on sandy soils,
especially in arid regions. Although close to 50 species have been described, it has been argued that many
of them may represent extremes in the natural range of variations found in Podaxis pistillaris. —
Wikipedia

Cactus Wren   1 comment

Cactus Wren — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Photography comes from the moment

existing at the time it was created.”

— kenne

Pincushion Cactus Flowers   Leave a comment

Pincushion Cactus Flowers — Image by kenne

When most people think of cactus in the Sonoran Desert, the image that comes to mind is the giant saguaro cactus. 
The saguaro grows only in the Sonoran Desert is one of the largest cacti. The saguaro cactus is a symbol of the American Southwest. 
Its inner meaning expresses the idea of standing tall, adapting to the environment, and providing shelter and nourishment for others.
Given its stature and authority, it holds a grandfatherly type of wisdom. 

Because saguaros are so common in the Tucson area, it is home to one of this nation’s national parks, the Saguaro National Park. 
However, it is not the most common cactus in the Sonoran Desert. That honor goes to the little pincushion cactus. 
Being so small and often in the shadows of the giant saguaro, their chances of being noticed are slim unless they are blooming.

— kenne

 

Bee On Chicory Wildflower   Leave a comment

Bee On Chickory Wildflower — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The monsoon season has begun the second-hottest and second-driest on record in Arizona, where heat records
are frequently broken last year. The last two years have seen fewer desert downpours, an important source of
summer river flow.

“We’re dealing with a rapidly changing climate that is becoming, overall, more dry and varied and warmer,”
said Scott Wilbor, an ecologist in Tucson who studies desert river ecosystems, including the San Pedro.
“We are in uncharted territory.” Click here to learn about the importance of Sonoran Desert rivers.

The Desert New Normal   1 comment

The Desert New Normal — Photo-Artistry by kenne

desert’s new normal

higher hot and dry levers

get use to it now

— kenne

Western Diamondback   3 comments

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (June 16, 2021) — Images by kenne

This rattlesnake slowly crosses the trail with a full belly.

 

Happiness   4 comments

Happiness — Image by kenne

I remember sitting there looking out over the valley,
there was such a sense of circumstance.
You know, that feeling that this is happiness.
It was the moment, right then.

— kenne

 

 

Desert Landscape — Arrangement In Gray and Black   Leave a comment

Desert Landscape — Arrangement In Gray and Black by kenne

“When at last, in all my storms, my whole self speaks,
then there is a pause. The soul collects itself into pure
silence and isolation—perhaps after much pain. The
mind suspends its knowledge and waits. The psyche
becomes strangely still.”

— from Fantasia of the Unconscious by D. H. Lawrence

Mexican Bird Of Paradise   1 comment

Mexican Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) — Image by kenne

Caesalpinia pulcherrima is a species of flowering plant in the pea family Fabaceae, native to the tropics and subtropics of the Americas.
It could be native to the West Indies, but its exact origin is unknown due to widespread cultivation. Common names for this species include poinciana, peacock flower, red bird of paradise, Mexican bird of paradise, dwarf poinciana, pride of Barbados, flos pavonis,
and flamboyant-de-jardin
. — Source: Wikipedia

Flower Associations   Leave a comment

Cactus Flower — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Everyone has many associations with a flower — 

the idea of flowers. You put out your hand to touch

the flower — lean forward to smell it — maybe

touch it with your lips almost without thinking —

or give it to someone to please them. 

Still — in a way — nobody sees a flower —

really — it is so small . . .

 

So I said to myself — I’ll paint what I see —

what the flower is to me but I’ll paint it big and

they will be surprised into taking time to look at it —

I will make even busy New Yorkers take time

to see what I see of flowers.

— Georgia O’Keeffe

Ciénega Creek — Photo Essay   Leave a comment

Hiking the Ciénega Creek Trail with Friend,Tom Markey — Images by kenne
(Click on Any Image for Larger View with Descriptions In a Slideshow Formate.)

Ciénega Creek Trail (English: “Hundred Springs Creek” or “Marsh Creek”) is an intermittent stream located within the Cienega Creek Natural Preserve, and is one of the most intact riparian corridors left in the state, represents one of the last perennial streams in southeastern Arizona. It originates in the Canelo Hills and continues northwest about 50 miles (80 km) to an area just outside Tucson, where it becomes known as Pantano Wash. Pantano Wash continues through Tucson and eventually connects with the Rillito River.

Gila Topminnow, once the most widespread fish in the Gila River basin (including Santa Cruz River), the Gila topminnow now claims Cienega Creek as its last stronghold in the United States. This guppy-like fish is good at thriving in less than ideal water conditions and loves to feast on mosquito larva. — Source: Pima County

Tucson Mountains Panorama   2 comments

Tucson Mountains West of Tucson, Arizona — Panorama by kenne

“Afoot and lighthearted I take to the open road, healthy, free, the world before me.”

― Walt Whitman

Life Springs Eternal   Leave a comment

Life Springs Eternal – New Life in the Presence of Death — Image by kenne

There are signs of life and death all around

that have evolved throughout all existence

towards a collective mitigation of existential

and catastrophic risks yet only in the present does

the proliferation of life affirms and consciously evolves.

— kenne

 

Tarantula Hawk   4 comments

Tarantula Hawk Near Cienega Creek — Images by kenne

As you can see, a tarantula hawk is not a hawk, but is a spider wasp (Pompilidae) that preys on tarantulas.
Tarantula hawks belong to any of the many species in the genera Pepsis and Hemipepsis. They are one of the
largest parasitoid wasps, using their sting to paralyze their prey before dragging it to a brood nest as living
food; a single egg is laid on the prey, hatching to a larva which eats the still-living prey.
Source: Wikipedi
a

Corral Fence Line Art   1 comment

Corral Fence Line — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“One final paragraph of advice: do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am – a reluctant enthusiast….a part-time crusader,
a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight
for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still here
.” 

— Edward Abbey

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