Archive for the ‘Sonoran Desert’ Category

Cordon Cactus   Leave a comment

Cordon Cactus blogCordon Cactus in Guaymas, Sonora On the Sea of Cortés (January 24, 2016) — Image by kenne

There are places
created for all deities,
poorly translated
to the non-deities.

— kenne

Desert Blossom Digital Art   5 comments

Prickly Pear Blossom-1785 Art blogDesert Blossom — Digital Art by kenne

The possession of a camera can inspire something akin to lust.

— Susan Sontag

Sonoran Elves   2 comments

Bug Springs 2012Sonoran Desert Elf Hole — Image by kenne

SONORAN ELVES

The Sonoran Desert
is an exceptional place,
at once a mythical
and magical land.

One little-known story,
occasionally heard echoing
through the mountain canyons,
is that of the ageless Sonoran elves.

Not your common elves,
but rather
well-to-do old elves
of good physical endurance,

known for their
clear and quick wit,
traversing between worlds –
real and imaginary.

I was born between
the real and the imaginary,
possessing the elf name
Angaráto Sáralondë —

I first noticed signs
of these desert elves
in the holes
of burnt desert trees.

Although preferring to
stay in the comfort
of their tree holes
the Sonoran Elves,

able to take on
average human height,
can be seen hiking
the canyon trails.

Warning:
they will attack
when threaten with
great fury and brawn!

— kenne

(Dedicated to my fellow hikers.)

An Ocotillo Morning In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Ocotillo IMG_3786 blog

Ocotillo-1595 blogOcotillo Blooming In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

Fouquieria splendens (commonly known as ocotillo American Spanish: [okoˈtiʝo], but also referred to as coachwhip, candlewood, slimwood, desert coral, Jacob’s staff, Jacob cactus, and vine cactus) is a plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States (southern Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas), and northern Mexico (as far south as Hidalgo and Guerrero).

Ocotillo Sun   Leave a comment

Ocotillo (1 of 1) Art blogOcotillo Sun — Digital Art by kenne

The ocotillos
are in bloom
all over the desert,
their red flame
lost only when
inline with the sun.

— kenne

Fairy Duster   2 comments

Fariy Duster-1620 blog

Fairy Duster DSC_1520 blog

Fairy Duster-1617 blogFairy Duster (Calliandra eriophylla) — Images by kenne

This perennial is one of the first blooming plants in the Sonoran Desert. These scrubs love hot and dry climates, so the Sonoran Desert is perfect for them.

— kenne

 

Cold Blooded and Warm Blooded Animals Are On The Move   2 comments

Desert Spinny Lizard-1661 blogDesert Spiny Lizard in the Saguaro National Park (April 2, 2018) — Image by kenne

Most days here in the Sonoran Desert are averaging in the 80’s causing reptiles to be on the move and our “snowbird” friends to start packing for their journey north. 

With morning lows around 50 degrees, this Desert Spiny (Sceloporus magister) was more interested in sunning than our nearby presence. This native of the Sonoran Desert is a large (up to about 142 mm or 5.6″ from snout to vent), stocky lizard with large, pointed, keeled, overlapping scales. The Desert Spiny can live up to six years, which explains the one that has been a patio friend for several years now, which I visit with each day. 

— kenne

 

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