Archive for the ‘Sonoran Desert’ Category

An Ocotillo Morning In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Ocotillo IMG_3786 blog

Ocotillo-1595 blogOcotillo Blooming In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

Fouquieria splendens (commonly known as ocotillo American Spanish: [okoˈtiʝo], but also referred to as coachwhip, candlewood, slimwood, desert coral, Jacob’s staff, Jacob cactus, and vine cactus) is a plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States (southern Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas), and northern Mexico (as far south as Hidalgo and Guerrero).

Ocotillo Sun   Leave a comment

Ocotillo (1 of 1) Art blogOcotillo Sun — Digital Art by kenne

The ocotillos
are in bloom
all over the desert,
their red flame
lost only when
inline with the sun.

— kenne

Fairy Duster   2 comments

Fariy Duster-1620 blog

Fairy Duster DSC_1520 blog

Fairy Duster-1617 blogFairy Duster (Calliandra eriophylla) — Images by kenne

This perennial is one of the first blooming plants in the Sonoran Desert. These scrubs love hot and dry climates, so the Sonoran Desert is perfect for them.

— kenne

 

Cold Blooded and Warm Blooded Animals Are On The Move   2 comments

Desert Spinny Lizard-1661 blogDesert Spiny Lizard in the Saguaro National Park (April 2, 2018) — Image by kenne

Most days here in the Sonoran Desert are averaging in the 80’s causing reptiles to be on the move and our “snowbird” friends to start packing for their journey north. 

With morning lows around 50 degrees, this Desert Spiny (Sceloporus magister) was more interested in sunning than our nearby presence. This native of the Sonoran Desert is a large (up to about 142 mm or 5.6″ from snout to vent), stocky lizard with large, pointed, keeled, overlapping scales. The Desert Spiny can live up to six years, which explains the one that has been a patio friend for several years now, which I visit with each day. 

— kenne

 

Bee On Indigo Blossom — Signs of Spring   1 comment

Bee on an Indigo Blossom-3428 blog.jpg

Bee on an Indigo Blossom-3431 blogBee On Indigo Blossom — Signs of Spring (Tohono Chul, Tucson, AZ, February 24, 2018) by kenne

“If the bee disappeared off the face of the Earth,
man would only have four years left to live.” 

— Albert Einstein

Anna’s Hummingbird   2 comments

Hummingbird - Youth blogFemale Anna’s Hummingbird — Image by kenne

Lack of rain in the Sonoran Desert has reduced the amount of food available for hummingbirds — very few wildflowers this year. But my lemon tree, which is in bloom has been attacking several of these small birds. Plus, I’m not sure how the warmer than normal has affected migration. 

Here in Tucson, you can see hummingbirds year-round in riparian areas and backyards. We are fortunate to have The Paton Center for Hummingbirds, a place to explore and experience the special birds of southeast Arizona. It is dedicated to the celebration and conservation of hummingbirds—and all of southeast Arizona’s astounding biodiversity—through recreation, education, and sustainable living.

— kenne

Gates Pass Area In The Tucson Mountains   1 comment

Tucson Mountains Panorama 3-blogGates Pass Area In The Tucson Mountains — Panorama by kenne (This panorama was created by merging three photos in Adobe Lightroom)

The road through the pass
is narrow with lots of curves
and no shoulders for the
many bikers going along the
crest of the Tucson Mountains.

Sunsets in the Sonoran Desert
at beautiful, especially when
viewed from Gates Pass after
spending the day at Old Tucson
or Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

— kenne

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