Archive for the ‘Arizona’ Category

Experiencing the Van Gogh Immersive Exhibit — Scottsdale   1 comment

Experiencing the Van Gogh Immersive Exhibit (Scottsdale, June 15, 2022) — Image by kenne

We have wanted to see the Immersive van Gogh exhibit for some time.
So, since we had planned on attending Jeri and Ron’s 50th Anniversary,
June 16-18 in Palm Springs, we drove up to Scottsdale on the 15.

The exhibition, conceived by Creative Director Mathieu St-Arnaud and his team at Montreal’s
world-renowned Normal Studio,
is an immersive experience that features more
than 300 of Vincent Van Gogh’s iconic artworks and takes the art lover

into a three-dimensional world that exhilarates the senses.

“I find comfort in contemplating the sunflowers.”

— Vincent van Gogh

Video by kenne

“I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?”

— Vincent van Gogh

Sunflowers — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.”

— Vincent van Gogh

This Blue-winged Bird   1 comment

Eastern Bluebird (August 8, 2012) Image by kenne

He had a blue wing tattooed on his shoulder
Well, it might have been a bluebird, I don’t know
But he’d get stone drunk and talk about Alaska
The salmon boats and 45 below
 
He got that blue wing up in Walla Walla
Where his cellmate there was a Little Willy John
And Willie, he was once a great blues singer
And Wing & Willie wrote him up a song
 
     (They sang,)
     “It’s dark in here, can’t see the light
     But I look at this blue wing when I close my eyes
     And I fly away, beyond these walls
     Up above the clouds, where the rain don’t fall
     On a poor man’s dream”
 
— from Blue Wing by Tom Russell
 
 

Taliesin West   Leave a comment

Taliesin West, Home of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona — Panorama by kenne

“No house should ever be on a hill or on anything.
It should be of the hill. Belonging to it.
Hill and house should live together with each the happier for the other.”

– Frank Lloyd Wright

Red (Flame) Skimmer   2 comments

Red (Flame) skimmer (Libellula saturata) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Philosophy is like trying to open a safe with a combination lock:
each little adjustment of the dials seems to achieve nothing,
only when everything is in place does the door open.

— Ludwig Wittgenstein

A Draught Doesn’t Stop Ocotillos From Blooming   1 comment

Ocotillos produce clusters of bright red flowers at their stem tips, which explain the plant’s name. 
Ocotillo means “little torch” in Spanish — Images by kenne

Waiting It Out

Desert display
as Saguaro’s spiny arms
raise to the darkening blue sky.
Days of heat waves
chase Ocotillo flower buds
drooping slowly in the mauve air
very still … and then,
with the distant rumble of thunder
and a flash of lightening,
comes a first drop.
Coming fast, the rain begins
a flood within the gulch
and there, from nowhere,
from the nothing dust,
from the ether
reconstituted
as out of a mirage
appears by the side of the road …
a toad.

— Sue Mason

Anne’s Hummingbird   Leave a comment

Anne’s Hummingbird (Tanuri Ridge) — Image by kenne

Nature’s little bird

Moves from blossom to blossom

In search of nectar.

— kenne

What Is A Lemon?   Leave a comment

Meyer Lemon Blossoms — Photo-Artistry by kenne

What is a lemon?
Is it a seed?
A blossom?
Pollen?
Fruit?
A tree?

All the above,
each is a stage
playing a part — 
connection of parts
forming a whole
in nature.

Always dependent
on water
on sunlight
on bees
on wind
on nature.

— kenne

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay   Leave a comment

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay In The Grand Canyon (October 2021) — Image by kenne

A Palo Verde Morning   Leave a comment

Blue Palo Verde Blooming in Tanuri Ridge — Images by kenne

Blue Palo Verde tree
A desert spring signature
Blossoms everywhere.

Morning walks add steps
Only to pause now and then
In a yellow world.

— kenne

 

Trailing Windmills Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Trailing Windmills — Image by kenne

The orchid-colored trailing windmills is a vine that grows along the ground; the plant may be 10 feet across.
The stems, leaves, and buds are covered with soft white hair. The stems and flowers are sticky, and one rarely finds
a flower without grains of sand stuck on the upper surface. Technically, what appears to be 1 flower is a cluster
of 3 resembling a single radially symmetrical flower but no one but a trained botanist would ever guess it.
— Source: wildflower.org

Somewhere South Of Town   Leave a comment

Somewhere South of Town — Image by kenne

In a field of green

Riding into the sunset

Somewhere south of town.


Coming to day’s end

Following her lead back home

Slow pace step by step.

— kenne

Desert Cottontail In The Brush   Leave a comment

Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus auduboni (Sabino Canyon Recreational Area) — Image by kenne

The desert portion of their common name arises from their distribution across the arid lands of the
American Southwest and Plains states. “Auduboni” honors John James Audubon,
the famous bird painter and naturalist. 

Richardson’s Geranium Blurred   Leave a comment

Richardson’s Geranium Blurred — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Can You See It?

Back-Tailed Gnatcatcher   Leave a comment

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Black-tailed gnatcatchers are found throughout Mexico and the southwest United States in North America.
These birds inhabit the Sonoran desert, which covers California and Arizona in the United States. Their range also
extends to the northwestern part of Mexico. Their range is found in the Chihuahuan desert which covers the western part
of Texas, the southeastern part of Arizona, and extends to the northern and central part of the Mexican plateau,
in the range of the Sonoran desert in the west. Migration is not seen in these birds during the winter season. Source: kidadl.com

 

Antelope Island   3 comments

Antelope Island On Lake Powell (June 26, 2014) — Image by kenne

The western United States is in a megadrought, and it’s getting worse. Currently, it is the driest it
has been in 1,200 years and is presently playing outlive. This image was taken in June of 2014 on Lake Powell
when the water level had already moved away, making it more a mountain than an island. Today the water levels
of both Lake Powell and Lake Mead are at record lows.
Studies of soil moisture levels in the West that includes
California, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, most of Oregon and Idaho, much of New Mexico, western Colorado,
northern Mexico, and southeast corners of Montana and Texas — using modern measurements and tree rings
for estimates that go back to the year 800. (Source: Arizona Daly Star)

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