Archive for the ‘Arizona’ Category

The Yellow Rose Of Arizona   1 comment

The Yellow Rose of Arizona (Prickly Pear Blossom) — Image by kenne

May brings on a bounty of cactus blossoms, and among them is the yellow prickly pear blossom,
our “yellow rose of Arizona.”

— Kenne

Greater Roadrunner Art   1 comment

Greater Roadrunner — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Roadrunner

A cuckoo bird that lives for speed,
With your shaggy crest, what a site indeed.
Streaked feathers break up your silhouette.
And your unusual track, not your typical set.

A blue and orange patch behind your eyes,
You prefer to chase prey, instead of fly.
Your expressive long tail flips here and there…
Quail chicks and k-rats best beware.

It’s true, I often see you running about,
With a limp lizard’s tail hanging from your mouth,
Some have witnessed your familiar antics,
taunting rattlesnakes, eagles, and hairy arachnids.

But my favorite three things have to be,
Your curiosity each time you encounter me,
And how you turn your back to the sun for its heat
(like a tiny matador, feathers erect and sleek).

Finally, I think I must surely admit
That trickster track—your zygodactyl footprint!
How do I know which way you are going?
With two toes facing forward and the back two, back-going.

It doesn’t matter much to me you will see
I just look for the “X” in the sand to guide me.
On the trail of a friend, a cuckoo I know
the Greater Roadrunner, always running, on the go.

— Michelle Hedgecock

Patio Cactus Blossoms   1 comment

Patio Cactus Blossoms — Image by kenne

It may have been a bad year for wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert,

however, the cactus plants are making up for the drought. 

— kenne

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel   1 comment

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel — Images by kenne

Round-tailed ground squirrels are comparatively small animals with grayish-brown coloring that matched the
sandy soils of their environment. Their unique characteristics are, most noticeably, their long, slender, rounded
tail, and secondly, their long, wide, hairy hind feet. Their claws and their small ears positioned low on the head,
enable them to live underground in a lifestyle that is semi-fossorial. They are often mistaken for prairie dogs or
gophers, but prairie dogs are much larger and gophers do not forage above ground.
— Source: Animalia 

 

Mexican Olive Blossoms   2 comments

Mexican Olive Blossoms (Cordia boissieri) — Images by kenne

This time of year, we get up earlier 

with daylight coming earlier to begin 
our morning walk while it’s still cool 
here in the desert. Now that I’m doing less hiking, 
it’s important to get the morning walks in. 
At my age, the key some mornings is not to 
walk faster and longer; it is to aim for continuation — 
got to keep on moving.

 
We were expecting rain overnight, 
expecting my walk might be delayed. 
When it does rain, I can hear it on the skylight; 
not hearing any, I knew there was no by daylight. 
The walk took place on schedule, 
commenting to other walkers, 
“the forecast was wrong.” 
We did get some rain after breakfast, 
not enough for the rain gauge to measure.
 
— kenne

Ravens Gathering On The Ridge   1 comment

Ravens Gathering On The Ridge — Image by kenne

Ravens on the ridge

Gather for the funeral

Death is without end.

— kenne

 

Agave Plant   Leave a comment

Agave Plant — Image by kenne

“Nearly all agaves, along with most bromeliads such as pineapple, are somewhat peculiar in their flowering habit.
They grow vegetatively for many years (though not the hundred years that gave rise to the common name of
century plant) without producing a single flower, and then when they get the urge to reproduce, they send
forth an enormous stalk with hundreds and hundreds of them. These plants that flower and set seed only once
in their lives are called monocarpic.”
— Source: Succulent Gardens

Anna’s Hummingbird   Leave a comment

Anna’s Hummingbird (Southern Arizona) — Image by kenne

The lack of bright color on the head indicates this is either a female or a young male. — kenne

Thistles In Molino Basin   Leave a comment

Thistles in Molino Basin — Image by kenne

The Early Bird Gets The Nectar   Leave a comment

“The Early Bird Gets the Nectar” (White-winged Dove on Saguaro Cactus Buds) — Image by kenne

In April, the budding of saguaros is followed by the return of white-winged doves from Mexico who love the nectar in
the saguaro blossoms. This image captures a white-winged dove atop buds soon to blossom — another take on
“The early bird gets the worm.”

— kenne

Sedona Area Panorama   2 comments

Sedona Area Panorama (Red Rock Country) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Our continual mistake is that we do not

concentrate upon the present day, the

actual hour, of our life: we live in the past

or in the future; we are continually expecting

the coming of some special moment when

our life will unfold itself in its full significance.

And we do not notice that life is flowing life

water through our fingers.

— Father Alexander Elchaninov 

Modern Woman   2 comments

 Modern Woman — Photo-Artistry by kenne

When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
the palm of my hand,
The need for my care.
’Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

— Maya Angelou, Phenomenal Woman

Coyote Fence Corral   Leave a comment

Coyote Fence Corral In Doubtful Canyon — Images by kenne

Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road
The road winding above among the mountains
Which are mountains of rock without water
If there were water we should stop and drink
Amongst the rock one cannot stop or think
Sweat is dry and feet are in the sand
If there were only water amongst the rock
Dead mountain mouth of carious teeth that cannot spit
Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit
There is not even silence in the mountains
But dry sterile thunder without rain
There is not even solitude in the mountains
But red sullen faces sneer and snarl
From doors of mudcracked houses
                                           If there were water
   And no rock
   If there were rock
   And also water
   And water
   A spring
   A pool among the rock
   If there were the sound of water only
   Not the cicada
   And dry grass singing
   But sound of water over a rock
   Where the hermit-thrush sings in the pine trees
   Drip drop drip drop drop drop drop
   But there is no water

— from The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot 

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument   1 comment

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument (03-21-12) — Image by kenne

This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre monument is a geologic treasure with some of the most spectacular
trails and views in the world. The monument contains many diverse landscapes, including the Paria Plateau,
Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. The monument borders Kaibab National Forest to the west
and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to the east. The monument includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
Cliffs Wilderness. Elevations range from 3,100 to 7,100 feet. The monument is also home to a growing number
of endangered California condors. Each year, condors hatched and raised in a captive breeding program are
released in the monument. To visit the monument, you’ll need extra planning and awareness of potential
hazards. Most roads need a high clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle due to deep sand.

— Source: The Bureau of Land Management

Old Desert Men   Leave a comment

“Old Desert Men” (San Simon, Arizona, 12-01-12) — Image by kenne

Sharing their knowledge
Looking in the direction
They expect to go.

Borrowing years of living
To guide them forward.

— kenne

 

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