Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon’ Tag

Rainy Morning In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Rainy Morning in Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

          Rain
          Sybilline heiress

     Droplight
     Lightning water

          air prison
          heart sugarcane

     Song crystal
     word song

          a promise
          a lie

     in drops of sand
     hidden.

— Lucha Corpi

A Recent Drive Up The Catalina Highway To Ski Valley   3 comments

Yesterday (08/05/20), I drove up the Catalina Highway to Mt. Lemmon. The highway was opened to the general public last Saturday morning for the first time since the Bighorn Fire began in early June. The mountain town of Summerheaven, successfully protected from the fire, is now open for business, although still having to follow HOVID-19 business regulations in Arizona.

Oricle Ridge-72Oracle Ridge and Mt. Lemmon Fire Station

Before entering Summerheaven, there are two ridges going north; Red Ridge and Oracle Ridge. Both ridges were severely burned during the 2003 Aspen Fire that destroyed almost all the homes in Summerheaven. Over the years since the Aspen Fire, the forest canopy has still not returned on these ridges. However, a lot of ground cover containing some bushes and small trees had returned. On June 17th, the two ridges were again burned. On June 19th, I posted two time-delay videos of the fire coming through the area pictured in the above photo. The fire station and most of the pines behind it were spared — not true of the storage building and new growth since the 2003 fire. It has now been 50 days since the fire occurred. Note how green the scared area has become with the return of ferns on the mountain slopes.

Except for the highway and Summerheaven, the public is not allowed to go anywhere in the National Forest. From what I was able to observe from the highway, most of the hiking trails with trailheads near the highway are ok, at least partially. Parts of Lower Butterfly Trail and Green Mountain Trail don’t look good from a distance.

My guess is that the trails in the forest around Summerheaven were burned like the two ridges north of Summerheaven. From a review of burn scar maps, the Marshall Gulch area to the north and west, which would include Carter Canyon, has been badly burned. For those of you who hike this area, It’s possible a lot of the Marshall and Mint Springs trails were destroyed. We may not know until November.

Since Sabino Creek originates along the Marshall Gulch Trail, the monsoon rains can result in a lot of potential flash flooding coming down through Sabino Canyon. So far, the rain amounts are very below average, but we are still in the monsoon season.

— kenne

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Images Taken From Catalina Highway by kenne

 

Sonoran Skyway –Edward Abbey   Leave a comment

Winter In The Desert 2010 10816-Edit-1-72Sonoran Sky Island — Images by kenne

“I feel again the poignant urge to grasp it, embrace it, know all
at once and all in all; but the harder I strive for such a consummation,
the more elusive that it becomes, slipping like a dream through my
arms. Can this desire be satisfied only in death? Something in our
human consciousness seems to make us forever spectators of
the world we live in.

Maybe some of my crackpot, occultist friends are right; maybe we
really are aliens here on earth, our spirits born on some other,
simpler, more human planet. But why were we sent here?
What is our mission, comrades, and when do we get paid?

A writer’s epitaph: He fell in love with the planted earth,
but the affair was never consummated.”

— Edward Abbey

“To the consternation of the “committed” reviewer, he is not a
conservationist or an environmentalist or a boxable list of any other
kind; he keeps on showing up as Edward Abbey, a horse of another
color, and one that requires some care to appreciate.”

— from “A Few Words in Favor of Ed Abbey” by Wendell Berry

Desert Eye Sunset II blog framed IIISonoran Desert Eye

“He had the zeal of a true believer and the sting of a scorpion.”

— Wallace Stegner referring to Edward Abbey

Art Student In The Canyon   1 comment

Art In The Canyon-art-72Art Student In Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

You may care not to admit it, but we all spend time thinking about our relationship to the universe, and all things that are connected. However, because of divergent forces inside each of us, we may spend time running from ourselves.

Some of the ways you are becoming focused on vicarious experiences, such as reading a mystery novel or playing computer games. We might also join a religion or political movement.

These acts involve little to no risk since there is little chance our connections with others becoming an objectification of who we really are. There is much evidence to show that running from self behavior is the result of an attitude managed by the dominant side of your brain.

You’re probably beginning to think, “. . . now we are going to get some of this right brain/left brain bull-shit!” Don’t worry, no brain theory this time.

However, call it what you may (left brain/right brain, head/heart, male/female sides, yin/yang, intellect/intuition), we all have exhibited behavior based on attitudes of self associated with the “head” — analytical, systematic, logical, objective, or intellectual. In our culture, organized groups (institutions) reinforce this behavior. We are told how “smart” we are; how “orderly” we are; how “logical” we are. We are considered well-grounded — what better for group identity!

On the other hand, if our behavior is considered coming from the “heart” — impulsive, artistic, romantic, creative, daring or intuitive — our behavior is looked upon as being unrealistic, unreliable, unstable, and unfocused. “She’s not a responsible child, but she’s happy and a lot of fun,” people would say.

The point is that an enormous number of forces exist inside of us between the head and the heart, which are struggling for control self. These forces can cause you to take the path of least resistance — allowing one side to win over the other. For instance, the dominant side will choose between opposites in a two-dimensional relationship. One can represent harmony, the other conflict, two basic forms of human interaction. Selecting between these two opposites results in zero communication and the desolation of self.

On the other hand, we can take the path least traveled — pushing the head and heart together, not allowing one side to win. The result of pushing harmony and conflict together is the creation of a third dimension, which represents autonomous and creative communication, among others, and the actual development of self. By allowing one side to win over the other, we draw a line between “what you think” and the “power to think.” The power to think only exists in this third dimension.

— kenne
______

Left Brain, Right Brain Magic:

While sitting at your desk, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles. Now, while doing this, draw the number “6” in the air with your right hand. Your foot will change direction, and there’s nothing you can do about it. Why? It’s a mystery!

Bighorn Fire Images — Marty Horowitz   2 comments

DSCN5396 edit big horn fire sabino smoke-72Bighorn Fire (Sabino Canyon Smoke) — Images by Marty Horowitz

 

Girl Scouts Learn About Nature   Leave a comment

Girl Scouts-72Girl Scouts In Sabino Canyon (11/12/14) 

One girl looks

at my guide

another

at her own —

so much to learn.

Together

we share

nature’s beauty.

Never too early

or late to start —

some by

asking questions,

others speaking

without a voice.

— kenne

Queen Of The Night   6 comments

Night Blooming Cereus 020-1-72Night Blooming Cereus — Images by Phil Bentley

One of the strangest plants of the desert, the night-blooming cereus, is a member Night Blooming Cereus 030-2-72

of the cactus family that resembles nothing more than a dead bush most of the year.Night Blooming Cereus 031-3-72

 It is rarely seen in the wild because of its inconspicuousness. But for one midsummer’s night each year,Night Blooming Cereus 019-4-72

 its exquisitely scented flower opens as night falls, then closes forever with the first rays of the morning sun.
— Content Source: Desert USA

 

 

View West From Blackett’s Ridge   Leave a comment

Blackett's Ridge-9897-72View West From Blackett’s Ridge Across Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The path to Han-shan’s place is laughable,

A path, but no sign of cart or horse.

Converging gorges — hard to trace their twists

Jumbled cliffs — unbelievably rugged.

A thousand grasses bend with dew,

A hill of pines hums in the wind.

And now I’ve lost the shortcut home,

Body asking shadow, how do you keep up?

— from Cold Mountain Poems by Gary Snyder

Bird In The Tree   3 comments

Luke --2 framed painting“Bird In The Tree” (Phainopepla, Sabino Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads.

It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.

— Malcolm Gladwell

Art In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Art In The Canyon-B&W-72Art In The Canyon (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

She rides the shuttle to Stop 8

Stepping off with her equipment

Setting up near the creekside

People relax in the spring sun

A perfect setting for the artists

One with a brush, one with a camera.

— kenne

 

 

Sabino Canyon: View From Blackett’s Ridge   3 comments

Blacketts Ridge March 2011Sabino Canyon: View From Blackett’s Ridge — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

Sabino Canyon Panorama   2 comments

Sabino Canyon-Pano-72Sabino Canyon Panorama by kenne

One of the things I find myself doing during this pandemic is going through many thousands of photos. My hiking lately has not been in the Canyon, instead at much higher elevations. This image is one of my favorite views looking down through the Canyon.

— kenne

A Majestic Saguaro In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Phoneline 12-21-12A Majestic Saguaro On Photoline Trail, Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

A stately cactus

An august desert symbol

Loved by everyone.

— kenne

 

Ed Rawl — A Celebration of Life   7 comments

Aspen Loop To Wilderness RocksEd Rawl On Wilderness Rocks Trail (June 29, 2012) — Image by kenne

On the morning of May 9, 2020 (6:00 am), we gathered with Ed’s brother, Rick, in the overflow parking lot for entrance into Sabino Canyon to celebrate Ed’s life. Ed died from a stroke on April 18, 2020. The is the third of three postings on Ed’s death:

https://kenneturner.com/2020/04/26/for-his-love-of-nature-ed-rawl-r-i-p/
https://kenneturner.com/2020/05/05/naturalist-ed-rawl-kind-words-for-a-very-special-man/

He had requested that his ashes be spread at a location where one could see both the sunrise and sunset. Because of the pandemic, the main entrance and services in Sabino Canyon were closed, which is why the event was scheduled to begin in the Sabino Canyon overflow parking lot.

After a few words from Rick, a group of about 20 hiked a short distance to a perfect location on the Esperero Trail. Several in the group shared their experiences with and love for Ed.

This video is meant to capture the essence of the celebration without making the video too long. Like his friends, Ed loved nature. It is therefore fitting that the point his ashes were being spread, a rabbit came into the picture, sitting there watching the ceremony.

— kenne

Video by kenne (May 10, 2020)

Adult Cooper’s Hawk   1 comment

Cooper's Hawk-72Adult Cooper’s Hawk In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

A medium-sized hawk with the classic accipiter shape: broad, rounded wings and a very long tail.
In Cooper’s Hawks, the head often appears large, the shoulders broad, and the tail rounded.

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