The Early Bird Gets The Nectar   Leave a comment

“The Early Bird Gets the Nectar” (White-winged Dove on Saguaro Cactus Buds) — Image by kenne

In April, the budding of saguaros is followed by the return of white-winged doves from Mexico who love the nectar in
the saguaro blossoms. This image captures a white-winged dove atop buds soon to blossom — another take on
“The early bird gets the worm.”

— kenne

Lake Robbins Bridge   Leave a comment

Lake Robbins Bridge, The Woodlands, Texas (2003) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

We should be blessed if we lived in the present always,

and took advantage of every accident that befell us,

like the grass which confesses the influence of the

slightest dew that falls on it; and did not spend our

time in atoning for the neglect of past opportunities . . .

We loiter in winter while it is already spring.

— Henry David Thoreau

Another Year of Few Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Another Year of Few Wildflowers In The Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

Spring wildflowers in the Sonoran desert depend on fall and winter rains. When there are little to no rains, as
has been the last few years, then there are few wildflowers in the spring. The above image is in the Molino
Basin, where in non-drought years, there are plenty of wildflowers to photograph. This year there are only a
few patches to be found.

— kenne

Sedona Area Panorama   2 comments

Sedona Area Panorama (Red Rock Country) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Our continual mistake is that we do not

concentrate upon the present day, the

actual hour, of our life: we live in the past

or in the future; we are continually expecting

the coming of some special moment when

our life will unfold itself in its full significance.

And we do not notice that life is flowing life

water through our fingers.

— Father Alexander Elchaninov 

Fencepost   1 comment

Fencepost — Image by kenne

Fencepost

I’ve been told
that I’m built like a fencepost
Kind of wiry
A few knobs here and there
A knot or two for character
I make a pretty good fence
Good at keeping things inside
Not letting things out
But now my shadow seems leaner
Not quite as tall in the morning sun
The soil around my feet eroding
Drying out isn’t all it’s cracked up to be
Staying straight ain’t easy
The herd is getting restless
And the barbed wire on my back
is tearing me up inside.

A Reflection Selfie   Leave a comment

A Reflection Selfie (Puerto Penasco, Mexico) — Image by kenne

I set my camera on top of the balcony wall during a stay at a resort in Puerto Penasco, April 12, 2013. — kenne

A Gila Monster Spring   Leave a comment

A Gila Monster Spring (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

Gila monsters are heavy-bodied lizards covered with beadlike scales, called osteoderms, that are black and
yellow or pink covering all but their belly. The Gila monster is venomous; its venom is made by a row of glands
in the lizard’s lower jaw. When the lizard bites, small grooves in the teeth help the venom flow into its prey. The
bite of a Gila monster is very strong, and the lizard may not loosen its grip for several seconds. It may even
chew so that the venom goes deeper into the wound. 

As the name might suggest, the Gila (pronounced HEE-la) monster has one of the worst reputations in the
reptile world. This lizard is often feared and has been described as frightful and repulsive, especially in local
folklore.
Source: San Diego Zoo

Modern Woman   2 comments

 Modern Woman — Photo-Artistry by kenne

When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
the palm of my hand,
The need for my care.
’Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

— Maya Angelou, Phenomenal Woman

Female Phainopepla In The Canyon   2 comments

Female Phainopepla In Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

Palo Verde Trees In The Spring   1 comment

Palo Verde Trees In the Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The palo verde tree is Arizona’s state tree, and rightfully so since once established, these trees truly need no
supplemental water to live. The tree’s bark is green and can photosynthesize something that in most plants,
only leaves do. This characteristic also allows the leaves to be very small and drop off during extreme drought conditions.

In the Sonoran desert, there are four types of palo verde trees. The above image illustrates two; the Blue Palo Verde
on the left and the Foothills Palo Verde on the right. The Blue Palo Verde will generally bloom first in the spring,
followed by the Foothills a few weeks later. During April, you can see these trees blooming everywhere in Tucson.

— kenne

A Grassy Meadow Known As Thimble Flat   Leave a comment

A Grassy Meadow Known as Thimble Flat  (Thimble Peak On the Left) — Image by kenne

Thimble Flat

We gathered early one November morning,

now we were going to turn words into action 

by hiking six miles to climb Thimble Peak.

Starting at the Gordon Hirabayashi Campground, 

we hiked the Sycamore Canyon trail to the

Bear Canyon trail, then leaving the trail at a flat

grassy meadow called Thimble Flat to traverse

around a deep gulley, making our way through rocks

and brush to the base of Thimble Peak, where we paused

to determine the best way to climb this pinnacle on a

mountain ridge, overlooking Tucson known as Thimble Peak.

— kenne

Canyon Hymn   1 comment

Canyons Near Moab, Utah — Image by kenne

A Canyon Hymn 

My place of worship has sandstone walls
Arches are altars and ledges become pews.
There are rafters of gnarled cottonwood limbs
Hidden alcove gardens are my inner sanctum.
Gods send messages down the aisles
In raging flash floods and down-canyon breezes.
After-storm rainbows are my stained glass
And potholes are the tadpole’s baptismal fonts.
Scriptures are revealed in images pecked and painted
On rock surface patina and sheltered cliff faces
While holy water seeps clear or flows blood red.
My collection plate is passed around by the BLM
And I stuff it with permit fees
At the end of each guiding season.

— Vaughn Hadenfeldt

 

Where Are We?   Leave a comment

Where Are We? (Doubtful Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

One hazel lost a leaf of gold
From a tuft at the tip, when the first voice told
The other he wished to know what ’twould be
To be sixty by this same post. “You shall see,”
He laughed—and I had to join his laughter—
“You shall see; but either before or after,
Whatever happens, it must befall,
A mouthful of earth to remedy all
Regrets and wishes shall freely be given;
And if there be a flaw in that heaven
’Twill be freedom to wish, and your wish may be
To be here or anywhere talking to me,
No matter what the weather, on earth,
At any age between death and birth,
To see what day or night can be,
The sun and the frost, the land and the sea,
Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring,—
With a poor man of any sort, down to a king,
Standing upright out in the air
Wondering where he shall journey, O where?”
 
— from The Sign-Post by Edward Thomas
 

Desert Beauty — Drafting In The Moment   2 comments

Desert Beauty — Image by kenne

The drifting sands

hug and cover the cactus

showing only its light

not letting me see

its shadows embracing

my passions intensely.

— kenne

Where The Water Runs Dry — Revisited   Leave a comment

Santa Cruz River South of Tucson — Image by kenne

We live in a land

where the water

runs dry,

the supply 

no longer sustainable

from the sky.

There was a time

when nature

met the need

until it met

the adversary,

greed.

— kenne

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