Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

Sabino Creek — Ash From The Bighorn Fire   1 comment

Sabino Creek — Ash From The Bighorn Fire — Image by kenne

It happens that I get tired
of revolutionary cafes
and peacock poets
of narcissistic reflexives
and the songs of the deaf.

It happens that I am terrified
by this hardened generation
that rushes out in search of absolutes
fashions names and blasphemies,
doctrinizes on the pros and cons
of armed struggle,
and meditates, with a beer in its hand
and a sour cry on its lips
on the cadavers of others

Who are  we?
Those same parishioners perhaps
who come and go indifferent
along the streets
on the Day of the Dead
with our hands full
of death’s-head cakes
and our hearts in ashes.

— from Day of the Dead In June by Lucha Corpi

Rainy Morning In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Rainy Morning in Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

          Rain
          Sybilline heiress

     Droplight
     Lightning water

          air prison
          heart sugarcane

     Song crystal
     word song

          a promise
          a lie

     in drops of sand
     hidden.

— Lucha Corpi

Desert Cotton Blossom   1 comment

Desert Cotton Blossom In Sabino Canyon (09/25/14) — Image by kenne

Sabino Canyon To Reopen With Partial Services   3 comments

CJ Woodard, Santa Catalina District Ranger

On Friday, September 18, 2020, District Ranger conducted a guided tour for Partner members ahead of the Scheduled Reopening of Sabino Canyon Recreational Area on September 21, 2020. Fifteen Partner members, five each from:

Friends of Sabino Canyon
Sabino Canyon Volunteer Nationalists
Santa Catalina Volunteer Patrol

In addition to the following video, images of the Drive-thru are in this Flickr Album.

David Lindo, The Urban Birder   Leave a comment

David LindoDavid Lindo (London, England), The Urban Birder at the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center — Image by kenne

As a blogger, I follow a lot of bloggers, mostly those into music, poetry,
and nature photography. One of my favorite blogs is Michael Stevenson’s “The Hobbledehoy.”  

Yesterday (08/09/20), Michael reblogged “A month in the life of The Urban Birder, David Lindo.
” Right away, I thought, “I know who David Lindo is.” Why do I know him?
In February of 2013, David presented to the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
in Tucson, Arizona.

I videoed the presentation, which was about 45 minutes. The idea was to make
it available in the SCVN library or on our website.
Well, without going into the details, it didn’t happen.

So, after Michael posted the article from Country Living,
I decided to reduce the length of his presentation and put it on YouTube.

This happening here in Tucson took place long before the Karens of the world were making news in Central Park.

— kenne

A Recent Drive Up The Catalina Highway To Ski Valley   3 comments

Yesterday (08/05/20), I drove up the Catalina Highway to Mt. Lemmon. The highway was opened to the general public last Saturday morning for the first time since the Bighorn Fire began in early June. The mountain town of Summerheaven, successfully protected from the fire, is now open for business, although still having to follow HOVID-19 business regulations in Arizona.

Oricle Ridge-72Oracle Ridge and Mt. Lemmon Fire Station

Before entering Summerheaven, there are two ridges going north; Red Ridge and Oracle Ridge. Both ridges were severely burned during the 2003 Aspen Fire that destroyed almost all the homes in Summerheaven. Over the years since the Aspen Fire, the forest canopy has still not returned on these ridges. However, a lot of ground cover containing some bushes and small trees had returned. On June 17th, the two ridges were again burned. On June 19th, I posted two time-delay videos of the fire coming through the area pictured in the above photo. The fire station and most of the pines behind it were spared — not true of the storage building and new growth since the 2003 fire. It has now been 50 days since the fire occurred. Note how green the scared area has become with the return of ferns on the mountain slopes.

Except for the highway and Summerheaven, the public is not allowed to go anywhere in the National Forest. From what I was able to observe from the highway, most of the hiking trails with trailheads near the highway are ok, at least partially. Parts of Lower Butterfly Trail and Green Mountain Trail don’t look good from a distance.

My guess is that the trails in the forest around Summerheaven were burned like the two ridges north of Summerheaven. From a review of burn scar maps, the Marshall Gulch area to the north and west, which would include Carter Canyon, has been badly burned. For those of you who hike this area, It’s possible a lot of the Marshall and Mint Springs trails were destroyed. We may not know until November.

Since Sabino Creek originates along the Marshall Gulch Trail, the monsoon rains can result in a lot of potential flash flooding coming down through Sabino Canyon. So far, the rain amounts are very below average, but we are still in the monsoon season.

— kenne

Slideshow

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Images Taken From Catalina Highway by kenne

 

Sabino Canyon Still Closed   Leave a comment

sabino-canyon-clouds_coopers-hawk-blogFlag Over Sabino Canyon Visitor Center (11/07/11) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

I miss not being able to be out in Sabino Canyon, which will remain closed because of the Bighorn Fire till November 1st.
The Forest Service is keeping the Canyon closed to minimize dam and infrastructure damage due to flash flooding
during the monsoon season.

On Wednesday, August 5th, some Naturalists will be part of a Zoon meeting with Santa Catalina District Ranger, CJ Woodard.
He will give an update on the Sabino Canyon closure and be available for questions and answers.

— kenne

Art Student In The Canyon   1 comment

Art In The Canyon-art-72Art Student In Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

You may care not to admit it, but we all spend time thinking about our relationship to the universe, and all things that are connected. However, because of divergent forces inside each of us, we may spend time running from ourselves.

Some of the ways you are becoming focused on vicarious experiences, such as reading a mystery novel or playing computer games. We might also join a religion or political movement.

These acts involve little to no risk since there is little chance our connections with others becoming an objectification of who we really are. There is much evidence to show that running from self behavior is the result of an attitude managed by the dominant side of your brain.

You’re probably beginning to think, “. . . now we are going to get some of this right brain/left brain bull-shit!” Don’t worry, no brain theory this time.

However, call it what you may (left brain/right brain, head/heart, male/female sides, yin/yang, intellect/intuition), we all have exhibited behavior based on attitudes of self associated with the “head” — analytical, systematic, logical, objective, or intellectual. In our culture, organized groups (institutions) reinforce this behavior. We are told how “smart” we are; how “orderly” we are; how “logical” we are. We are considered well-grounded — what better for group identity!

On the other hand, if our behavior is considered coming from the “heart” — impulsive, artistic, romantic, creative, daring or intuitive — our behavior is looked upon as being unrealistic, unreliable, unstable, and unfocused. “She’s not a responsible child, but she’s happy and a lot of fun,” people would say.

The point is that an enormous number of forces exist inside of us between the head and the heart, which are struggling for control self. These forces can cause you to take the path of least resistance — allowing one side to win over the other. For instance, the dominant side will choose between opposites in a two-dimensional relationship. One can represent harmony, the other conflict, two basic forms of human interaction. Selecting between these two opposites results in zero communication and the desolation of self.

On the other hand, we can take the path least traveled — pushing the head and heart together, not allowing one side to win. The result of pushing harmony and conflict together is the creation of a third dimension, which represents autonomous and creative communication, among others, and the actual development of self. By allowing one side to win over the other, we draw a line between “what you think” and the “power to think.” The power to think only exists in this third dimension.

— kenne
______

Left Brain, Right Brain Magic:

While sitting at your desk, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles. Now, while doing this, draw the number “6” in the air with your right hand. Your foot will change direction, and there’s nothing you can do about it. Why? It’s a mystery!

Girl Scouts Learn About Nature   Leave a comment

Girl Scouts-72Girl Scouts In Sabino Canyon (11/12/14) 

One girl looks

at my guide

another

at her own —

so much to learn.

Together

we share

nature’s beauty.

Never too early

or late to start —

some by

asking questions,

others speaking

without a voice.

— kenne

Queen Of The Night   6 comments

Night Blooming Cereus 020-1-72Night Blooming Cereus — Images by Phil Bentley

One of the strangest plants of the desert, the night-blooming cereus, is a member Night Blooming Cereus 030-2-72

of the cactus family that resembles nothing more than a dead bush most of the year.Night Blooming Cereus 031-3-72

 It is rarely seen in the wild because of its inconspicuousness. But for one midsummer’s night each year,Night Blooming Cereus 019-4-72

 its exquisitely scented flower opens as night falls, then closes forever with the first rays of the morning sun.
— Content Source: Desert USA

 

 

Learning About Rocks   5 comments

Wild for the Wilderness (1 of 1)-68-Girl-B&W-72Learning About Rocks — Image by kenne

 

Bird In The Tree   3 comments

Luke --2 framed painting“Bird In The Tree” (Phainopepla, Sabino Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads.

It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.

— Malcolm Gladwell

Art In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Art In The Canyon-B&W-72Art In The Canyon (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

She rides the shuttle to Stop 8

Stepping off with her equipment

Setting up near the creekside

People relax in the spring sun

A perfect setting for the artists

One with a brush, one with a camera.

— kenne

 

 

Greater Roadrunner — Listen!   1 comment

Greater Roadrunner-Edit-1-art-Edit-1-72Greater Roadrunner Photo-Artistry by kenne

Listen!
The gravel verge bears a walker:
I hear chewing of shredded wheat.
Listen!
Birds call from dawn to sundown:
tedious mourning dove blues, 
cactus wren’s grinding starter,
darting quail high notes: Uh-huh-Uh huh,
Hey-you! alert – the thrasher arrives.
Listen!
Our homes hum tones tiny to tremendous; 
stretched and still in darkness,
I seek their source, finding some
in the pestling of brain, bones, molars.
Listen!
Attending too, to unfulfilled utterances:
hesitations, head dips, hand flutters,
the staccato of unsettled eyes and breath:
these voiceless notes of soul speak
of love or loss or the deep water strokes
of living without answers. 
Listen!
 
Listen! poem (c)2020 Deborah Chappa
(Used by Permission)

Sabino Canyon Panorama   2 comments

Sabino Canyon-Pano-72Sabino Canyon Panorama by kenne

One of the things I find myself doing during this pandemic is going through many thousands of photos. My hiking lately has not been in the Canyon, instead at much higher elevations. This image is one of my favorite views looking down through the Canyon.

— kenne

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