Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

Saguaros In The Morning Haze   1 comment

Saguaros In the Morning Haze (02-04-13) — Image by kenne

The haze is lifting

Sun rising over the ridge

A new day has dawned.

— kenne

Eastern Bluebird Painting   Leave a comment

Eastern Bluebird — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The bluebird carries the sky on his back.

— Henry David Thoreau

You Look One Way, I’ll Look The Other   3 comments

You Look One Way, I’ll Look The Other (Northern Mockingbird & Phainopepla) — Image by kenne

“All of us–bright atheists and committed religionists–need to wake now and hear the earth call . . . .
We need to give and receive as love shows us how, join with each pilgrim who quests for the true,
give heed to the voices of the suffering, awaken our consciences with justice as our guide,
and work toward a planet transformed by our care.”

Scotty McLennan

Saguaros In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Saguaros In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Sometimes happiness is a blessing,
but, generally, it is a conquest.
Each day’s magic moment
helps us to change and sends us off
in search of our dreams.

— Paulo Coelho

Intense Drought   2 comments

Intense Drought in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Prickly pear cactus are among the first cactus to die during a drought.

Draught In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Intense Drought In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The Sonoran Desert
known for its biodiversity
having two rainy seasons

the summer monsoon
and winter rainy season
now experiencing drought.

Normal drought conditions
made worse by La Niña
event reducing rainfall.

Many native plants are dying
vegetation green-up is poor
during this intense drought.

— kenne

 

Ocotillos Show Signs Of Spring   Leave a comment

Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens) Blossom in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Very little rain in Sabino Canyon hasn’t stopped the cycles of life from taking place.
Most of the year, Ocotillos look like a bunch of gray sticks. But in the spring, are during the
summer monsoon season, the sticks leaf out. However, the red flame blossoms
only happen in the spring.

Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens) Leaves — Image by kenne

Fouquieria splendens is a plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert in the Southwestern United States
and northern Mexico. While semi-succulent and a desert plant, Ocotillo is more closely related to tea
and blueberries than cactuses. Source: Wikipedia

Dead Cholla Cactus   2 comments

Dead Cholla (Sabino Canyon Recreation Area) — Image by kenne

The continued drought in the desert southwest is taking its toll.

Cholla Cactus   1 comment

Cholla Cactus in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

When walking by a cholla,
you may walk away
with a piece of the cactus,
wondering how to remove it.

— kenne

Water In The Canyon   3 comments

Water Above Sabino Dam 

Snowmelt on Mt. Lemmon has water in Sabino Creek for the first time in months.

Water running in Sabino Creek — Images by kenne

Sabino Canyon Panorama   4 comments

Sabino Canyon Panorama (February 9,2021) by kenne

Vista Ramada

the ones who live in the desert,
if you knew them
you would understand everything.

— Lucille Clifton

Fountain Grass   Leave a comment

Fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum) In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area — Image by kenne

Fountain Grass is a perennial bunchgrass with attractive purple or green flowers. It is an ornamental plant that is still sold in nurseries. Although some nursery varieties are considered “sterile,” no varieties are recommended for planting and landscaping. Fountain grass is a close relative of buffelgrass, the most problematic invasive species in the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area. Fountain grass is present in much of the western United States and is a big problem invasive species in Arizona, Nevada, Hawaii, and California. 

Fountain grass is a native of Africa. Fountain grass seed was first available in the US around 1880and has been cultivated as an ornamental plant in Tucson since 1940. Records document that fountain grass began establishing itself in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson as early as 1946. 

Fountain grass can form dense stands with several undesirable effects. It provides a large amount of fuel for hot fires that can destroy native plants and animals. It displaces native grasses, blocks the natural flow of water in washes, and alters animals’ habitat, particularly frogs and toads that are sensitive to such changes. Source: National Park Service

Adult Male Eastern Bluebird   1 comment

Adult Male Eastern Bluebird — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The Eastern Bluebird is a small thrush with a big, rounded head, large eye, plump body, and alert posture.
The wings are long, but the tail and legs are fairly short. The bill is short and straight.

Male Eastern Bluebirds are vivid, deep blue above and rusty or brick-red on the throat and breast.
Blue in birds always depends on the light, and males often look plain gray-brown from a distance.
Source: All About Birds

‘Hope is a slave; Despair is a freeman.’   1 comment

Male Cardinal  in Sabino Canyon, An Early Sign of Spring — Images by kenne

The Freeman

Hope is a slave; Despair is a freeman.’

A VAGABOND between the East and West,
Careless I greet the scourging and the rod;
I fear no terror any man may bring,
Nor any god.

The clankless chains that bound me I have rent,
No more a slave to Hope I cringe or cry;
Captives to Fate men rear their prison walls,
But free am I.

I tread where arrows press upon my path,
I smile to see the danger and the dart;
My breast is bared to meet the slings of Hate,
But not my heart.

I face the thunder and I face the rain,
I lift my head, defiance far I fling, —
My feet are set, I face the autumn as
I face the spring.

Around me on the battlefields of life,
I see men fight and fail and crouch in prayer;
Aloft I stand unfettered, for I know
The freedom of despair.

 
— Ellen Glasgow

Female Cardinal   2 comments

Female Cardinal — Image by kenne

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