Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

Lunch On A Limb   Leave a comment

“Lunch On A Limb” Cooper’s Hawk Eating a Catch In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

A life ended so another can survive.

— kenne

 

Pin Cushion Cactus and Funnel-Wed Spider   1 comment

Pin Cushion Cactus (the most common cactus in the Sonoran Desert)
and Funnel-Wed Spider In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

 

Missing The Kids In The Canyon   1 comment

Elementary School Class In Sabino Canyon (February, 2012) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Since March of 2020 Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have not bee working with students on field trips
in the Tucson area. We are hoping to start offering nature classes again this fall. Meanwhile, SCVN has developed
a series of videos called The Canyon Classroom covering some of the “Fun Facts” covering the history, geology,
ecology, and wildlife of Sabino Canyon.

(Original image provided by the teacher.)

— kenne

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel   1 comment

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel — Images by kenne

Round-tailed ground squirrels are comparatively small animals with grayish-brown coloring that matched the
sandy soils of their environment. Their unique characteristics are, most noticeably, their long, slender, rounded
tail, and secondly, their long, wide, hairy hind feet. Their claws and their small ears positioned low on the head,
enable them to live underground in a lifestyle that is semi-fossorial. They are often mistaken for prairie dogs or
gophers, but prairie dogs are much larger and gophers do not forage above ground.
— Source: Animalia 

 

Budding Season For Saguaro Cactus   Leave a comment

Budding Season For Saguaro Cactus (Sabino Canyon) — Images by kenne

Agave Plant   Leave a comment

Agave Plant — Image by kenne

“Nearly all agaves, along with most bromeliads such as pineapple, are somewhat peculiar in their flowering habit.
They grow vegetatively for many years (though not the hundred years that gave rise to the common name of
century plant) without producing a single flower, and then when they get the urge to reproduce, they send
forth an enormous stalk with hundreds and hundreds of them. These plants that flower and set seed only once
in their lives are called monocarpic.”
— Source: Succulent Gardens

The Early Bird Gets The Nectar   Leave a comment

“The Early Bird Gets the Nectar” (White-winged Dove on Saguaro Cactus Buds) — Image by kenne

In April, the budding of saguaros is followed by the return of white-winged doves from Mexico who love the nectar in
the saguaro blossoms. This image captures a white-winged dove atop buds soon to blossom — another take on
“The early bird gets the worm.”

— kenne

A Gila Monster Spring   Leave a comment

A Gila Monster Spring (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

Gila monsters are heavy-bodied lizards covered with beadlike scales, called osteoderms, that are black and
yellow or pink covering all but their belly. The Gila monster is venomous; its venom is made by a row of glands
in the lizard’s lower jaw. When the lizard bites, small grooves in the teeth help the venom flow into its prey. The
bite of a Gila monster is very strong, and the lizard may not loosen its grip for several seconds. It may even
chew so that the venom goes deeper into the wound. 

As the name might suggest, the Gila (pronounced HEE-la) monster has one of the worst reputations in the
reptile world. This lizard is often feared and has been described as frightful and repulsive, especially in local
folklore.
Source: San Diego Zoo

Female Phainopepla In The Canyon   2 comments

Female Phainopepla In Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

Palo Verde Trees In The Spring   1 comment

Palo Verde Trees In the Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The palo verde tree is Arizona’s state tree, and rightfully so since once established, these trees truly need no
supplemental water to live. The tree’s bark is green and can photosynthesize something that in most plants,
only leaves do. This characteristic also allows the leaves to be very small and drop off during extreme drought conditions.

In the Sonoran desert, there are four types of palo verde trees. The above image illustrates two; the Blue Palo Verde
on the left and the Foothills Palo Verde on the right. The Blue Palo Verde will generally bloom first in the spring,
followed by the Foothills a few weeks later. During April, you can see these trees blooming everywhere in Tucson.

— kenne

Wildflowers On Esperero Trail   Leave a comment

Esperero Trail Wildflowers In Sabino Canyon (Spring 2013) — Image by kenne

What lies in the heart

of a hiker is that a

spiritual landscape exists

within the visual landscape

something fleeting in the land,

a moment when shape, color,

and movement intensify

revealing something sacred

leading to another level of reality.

— kenne

7 Falls Trail   Leave a comment

7 Falls Trail In Bear Canyon (03-20-15) — Image by kenne

After a day’s walk, everything has twice its usual value.

 
— G.M. Trevelyan

Kids Love Rocks   1 comment

Kids Love Rocks — Image by kenne

Touching each rock

with a magnet, she

learns which is magnetite.

— kenne

Saguaros On My Mind   Leave a comment

Saguaros On My Mind — Images by kenne

A nurse tree

can help raise

generations

of saguaros

only to die

long before

the cactus’.

— kenne

Walking With Bird Experts   3 comments

White-crowned Sparrow — Image by kenne

I try to walk

with bird experts

when out in nature

so I can learn

the names 

of those

I photograph.

— kenne

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