Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

Cedar Waxwings Sharing Food   Leave a comment

Cedar Waxwings Sharing Food In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Plenty of berries

Here in Sabino Canyon

For migrating birds.

— kenne

Desert Spiny Lizard — Getting A Little Sun   Leave a comment

Desert Spiny Lizard — Getting A Little Sun (Sabino Canyon Recreation Area) — Image by kenne

Cooper’s Hawk   Leave a comment

Cooper’s Hawk In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

A beautiful bird

And a super partiture

Love dive booming doves

— kenne

Thurber’s Wild Cotton Blossoms Art   Leave a comment

Thurber’s Wild Cotton Blossoms (Sabino Canyon Recreation Area) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Let us not look back in anger, nor forward in fear, but around in awareness.

— James Thurber

Looking Back To Spring of 2011   Leave a comment

Originally posted April 2011 on Becoming is Superior to Being. — kenne

“The only thing we can perceive are our perceptions. In other words, consciousness is the matrix upon which
the cosmos is apprehended. Color, sound, temperature, and the like exist only as perceptions in our head,
not as absolute essences. In the broadest sense, we cannot be sure of an outside universe at all.” — George Berkeley

Artist Along Sabino Creek In Sabino Canyon, April, 2011 — Image by kenne

Water

Pressure of sun on the rockslide
Whirled me in dizzy hop-and-step descent,
Pool of pebbles buzzed in a Juniper shadow,
Tiny tongue of a this-year rattlesnake flicked,
I leaped, laughing for little boulder-color coil–
Pounded by heat raced down the slabs to the creek
Deep tumbling under arching walls and stuck
Whole head and shoulders in the water:
Stretched full on cobble–ears roaring
Eyes open aching from the cold and faced a trout.

 — Gary Snyder in Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems

The poem originally appeared Riprap, which was Snyder’s first book of poetry. For Snyder, nature as divine, which goes hand-in-hand with the biocentric nature of his Buddhist beliefs.

— kenne

Pandemic Kids In The Canyon   4 comments

Pandemic Kids (1st Graders) In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area — Image by kenne

In the last week of October, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) began offering nature classes to elementary school children
four days a week, the first time since March 2020. The number of children per day is a maximum of 30 students that are
divided into six groups. Masks are required except where social distancing is possible. The children have been perfect about
wearing masks, even though it may not be a school requirement. Some field trips have been canceled due to COVID outbreaks at the schools.
All the SCVN members have been vaccinated. Still, some naturalists have tested positive and have been self-quarantining.

— kenne

Thurber’s Cotton   Leave a comment

Thurber’s Cotton with Bee (Sabino Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The cup-shaped flowers are 1 1/2 inches (3.8 cm) wide and have 5 broad, white petals that fade to pink as they age.
The petals are either solid white or streaked with pink at the base. The flowers are followed by round, green seed capsules that dry
to a brown color and split open to reveal the seeds and only a few, sparse cotton fibers. This plant is related to cultivated cotton,
but its cotton is too paltry for commercial use. The leaves are green and palmately lobed with 3 or 5 point-tipped lobes.
The leaves turn a bright red color in the fall (around late October). Source: fireflyforest.com

Red-Tailed Hawk   2 comments

Red-tailed Hawk in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Hawks gotta fly high

Staking out a hunting spot

Cross the desert plain

 

— kenne

Northern Mockingbird   1 comment

Northern Mockingbird in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

One of the most familiar birds in the Sonoran Desert is the Northern Mockingbird. They hunt insects and spiders eat a wide variety of fruits;
berries of lantana and pyracantha are mainstays. Males and females have similar plumage: nearly uniform gray except for long dark tail
and white patch in open wing. Males are the singers that often practice all night long on a concatenation of bird songs borrowed
from a variety of other bird species. Three plants in particular produce fruit attractive to mocking birds: Desert Mistletoe,
Fremont Thornbush, and Desert Hackberry.

Fall In The Sonoran Desert — No Words   Leave a comment

Fall In The Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

Fire Above The Canyon   Leave a comment

The Big Horn Fire Above Sabino Canyon, June 2020 — Photo-Artistry by kenne

. . . In remembrance of last year’s Big Horn Fire in the Santa Catalina Mountains.

Red Rock Skimmer   Leave a comment

Red Rock Skimmer (October 28, 2021) — Image by kenne

On a cool morning

Sunning on a concrete bridge

Near Sabino Creek.

— kenne

Funereal Duskywing Butterfly   2 comments

Funereal Duskywing Butterfly (Sabino Canyon, October 28, 2021) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Sometimes, the most profound of awakenings

come wrapped in the quietest of moments.”

— Stephen Crane

Sacred Datura Flower   1 comment

Sacred Datura Flower — Image by kenne

Witches and sorcerers cultivated plants with the power to “cast spells” — in our vocabulary, “psychoactive” plants.
Their potion recipes called for such things as datura, opium poppies, belladona, hashish, fly-agaric mushrooms (Amanita muscaria),
and the skin of toads (which can contain DMT, a powerful hallucinogen). These ingredients would be combined in a hempseed-oil-based
“flying ointment” that the witches would then administer vaginally using a special dildo. This was the “broomstick”
by which these women were said to travel.

— Michael Pollan

Be A Flower   Leave a comment

Flatspine Stickseed — Image by kenne

Be a flower. 
Be a seed. 
Let your growth
Arouse curiosity.
Let it fascinate
And amaze.
Let it inspire the artist
And the scientist. 
Let it shock the doubters.
Let it grant hope
To the hopeless.
Let it begin in silence, 
And end with a loud bang.
Don’t be an open book –
Be mysterious. 
Be extraordinary,
B
e undefinable, 
Be a ball of fiery fire, 
And above all, 
Grow in silence, 
And let your success
Do the talking.

― from Song of a Nature Lover by Michael Bassey Johnson, 

%d bloggers like this: