Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

Sonoran Desert Tortoise   Leave a comment

Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.

— James Bryant Conant

desert tortoise (1 of 1) blogSonoran Desert Tortoise (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

The Sonoran Desert Tortoise is a large terrestrial turtle with a rough, keelless carapace that is gray to orange-brown, the plastron is not hinged, the hind limbs are elephantine, the front feet are shovel-like, and a prominent median projection extends forward from the front of the plastron (gular shield). For more than three decades, the Sonoran Desert Tortoise has been the subject of considerable conservation planning and action, much of which was adapted from conservation of the Mojave Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), a species listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. 

In 2010, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined that the Sonoran Desert Tortoise warranted listing as a threatened or endangered species.  Since that time it has been a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (Source: Tucson Herpetological Society)

A Fallen Barrel Cactus   2 comments

Fallen Barrel Cactus-72.jpgBarrel Cactus In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Laying on its side
Overcome by its own weight
Blooms for the future.

— kenne

Pincushion Cactus Fruit   2 comments

Pin Cushion Fruit-72Pincushion (mammillaria) Cactus Fruit — Image by kenne

This small cactus is ubiquitous in Sabino Canyon and can be more easily spotted
this time of year because most ground cover around it has dried up. 

Pincushion cactus
Beautiful blossoms and fruit
To often overlooked.

— kenne

 

Night-blooming Cereus Fruit   Leave a comment

Night-blooming cereus-72.jpg

Night-blooming cereus-2-72Night-blooming Cereus Fruit (Sabino Canyon Recreational Area) — Images by kenne

“This unusual cactus has an aura of mystery about it, as it is rarely seen in the wild. Looking like dead creosote branches, it is not until it blooms that the Desert Night-blooming Cereus becomes obvious. Most of its mass is in a tuber below the ground. Twiggy finger-thick stems can grow up to 5’ long. Flowering happens at night, usually occur in June, and blooms are large, white, and fragrant. Golf ball size bright red fruit follow. This species occurs naturally in Arizona to Chihuahua, Zacatecas, and Sonora.”

— Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum 

    FLOWER of the moon!
Still white is her brow whom we worshiped on earth long ago;
Yea, purer than pearls in deep seas, and more virgin than snow.
The dull years veil their eyes from her shining, and vanish afraid,
Nor profane her with age—the immortal, nor dim her with shade.        

It is we are unworthy, we worldlings, to dwell in her ways;
We have broken her altars and silenced her voices of praise.
She hath hearkened to singing more silvern, seen raptures more bright;
To some planet more pure she hath fled on the wings of the night,—
    Flower of the moon!  

— from The Night-Blooming Cereus by Harriet Monroe

 

Distant Friends   1 comment

Our good friends from Porter, Texas, Ken and Mary Harris,
spent several days with us before continuing the western swing through Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico.

— kenne

Ken & Mary Visit-72Joy, Mary, and Ken, Mission San Xavier del Bac

Ken & Mary Visit -- Sabino Canyon-2-72Mary, Ken, and Kenne In Sabino Canyon Recreational Area

Mary On Mt. Lemmon-72Mary On Mt. Lemmon

“Sweet is the memory of distant friends!
Like the mellow rays of the departing sun,
it falls tenderly, yet sadly, on the heart.” 

– Washington Irving

 

Lizard Walk In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

The last Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) Lizard took place on October 12th.
It was a perfect fall morning for a lizard walk. However,
some lizards may have not agreed since the number of sightings were low.
Still, it was a beautiful morning for a nature walk.

Lizard Walk October 2019-72.jpgNaturalists Tom Skinner and Fred Heath welcome the walkers in front of the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center.

Lizard Walk October 2019-3-72.jpgEveryone gathers near lizard spotter off the trail,

Lizard Walk October 2019 Common Side-blocked-72.jpga common side-blotched lizard.

Lizard Walk October 2019-4-72Naturalists Bill and Lousie Kaufman share information on the common side-bloched lizard.
— Images by kenne

 

In the parched path 
I have seen the good lizard 
(one drop of crocodile) 
meditating. 
With his green frock-coat 
of an abbot of the devil, 
his correct bearing 
and his stiff collar, 
he has the sad air 
of an old professor. 
Those faded eyes 
of a broken artist, 
how they watch the afternoon 
in dismay!

-- from "The Old Lizard" by Federic Garcia Lorca

Saguaros On The Comeback Trail   1 comment

In September of 2011, I titled a post “Why Would Anyone Do This?” There were several Saguaro cactus that were vandalized on the Bear Canyon Trail in Sabino Canyon.

In August of 2015, I posted a follow-up photo-essay on the damaged cactus.

Recently I photograph the cactus that were damaged, again.

When I talk
about Sabino Canyon
I mean myself,
my home,
my state of mind.
Some don’t get what I say,
maybe it’s because
we don’t talk the same language.
All I can say to those I meet:
“Try and make it to Sabino Canyon.”

— kenne

Lizard Walk October 2019-7.jpg

Lizard Walk October 2019-8-72

Lizard Walk October 2019-9-72

Lizard Walk October 2019-10-72

Saguara Cactus-72Images by kenne

 

 

 

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