Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Category

May The Bluebird of Happiness Visit You Today   Leave a comment

‘Bluebird of Happiness’ — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Be like I, hold your head up high,
Till you find a bluebird of happiness.
You will find greater peace of mind
Knowing there’s a bluebird of happiness.
And when he sings to you,
Though you’re deep in blue,
You will see a ray of light creep through,
And so remember this, life is no abyss,
Somewhere there’s a bluebird of happiness.

— from The Bluebird of Happiness by Edward Heyman

Benedicto   1 comment

Snow On The Peaks Above Sabino Canyon — Image by

We are blessed to live on this beautiful planet.
Yet, most people don’t show any gratitude.

 

Benedicto

May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous,
leading to the most amazing view.
May your rivers flow without end,
meandering through pastoral valleys tinkling with bells,
past temples and castles and poets’ towers
into a dark primeval forest
where tigers belch and monkeys howl,
through miasmal and mysterious swamps
and down into a desert of red rock,
and down again into a deep vast ancient unknown chasm
where bars of sunlight blaze on profiled cliffs,
where deer walk across the white sand beaches,
where storms come and go
as lightning clangs upon the high crags,
where something strange and more beautiful
and more full of wonder than
your deepest dreams waits for you–
beyond that next turning of the canyon walls.

– Edward Abbey

Phainopepla Art   Leave a comment

Phainopepla (Luke) — Art by kenne

One reason that birds matter – ought to matter – is that they are our last, best connection to a natural world that is otherwise
receding. They’re the most vivid and widespread representatives of the Earth as it was before people arrived on it.

— Jonathan Franzen

 

 

Phoneline Trail   1 comment

Phoneline Trail — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Is it the path not taken 

are the one less traveled?

— kenne

Waiting For Luke   Leave a comment

Luke, A White Crested Phainopepla — Image by kenne

This is the time of year some SCVN members state watching for the return of “Luke” to Sabino Canyon. Phainopeplas generally spend
their summers at the higher elevations of the Santa Cantilina Mountains, returning to the canyon to feed off the desert mistletoe berries
in the canyon. 

What makes Luke unique is his white crest. For over eleven years, Luke can be spotted in the same general area in the canyon. Unfortunately, because of the pandemic, we don’t know if Luke returned last year since many of us were not doing our usual nature walks in Sabino Canyon. 

Phainopeplas usually perch high on canyon mesquite trees. They have digestive tracts specialized for eating mistletoe fruit. 
These berries are low in nutrients, so the birds have to consume lots of them. The berries spend only about 12 minutes in a
Phainopepla’s intestine, 
and the birds may eat 1,100 berries in a day.

A singular bird of the Southwest, they are a brilliant sight in flight. Males are silky black and slender, with an elegant crest and bold white
wing patches that appear when the bird takes wing. Phainopeplas nearest common ancestors are the waxwings, which also have a glossy, 
silky look to their plumage.

Greater Roadrunner   Leave a comment

Greater Roadrunner Gathering Sticks for Building A Nest — HDR Image by kenne

Rule 1.

The Road Runner cannot harm the Coyote except by going “beep-beep!”

— from 9 Rules for Road Runner and Wild E. Coyote Cartoon

Nursing Four Saguaros   Leave a comment

Nurse Tree for Four Saguaros In  Sabino Canyon — HDR Image by kenne

“I have come to the conclusion,
after many years of sometimes sad experience,
that you cannot come to any conclusion at all.”

― from In Your Garden Again by Vita Sackville-West, 

Life and Death in Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

Life and Death in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

First/Last Meditation

Time
is in night’s colors.
Quiet night.
Over enormous moons,
eternity
is set at twelve.
Time’s gone to sleep
forever
in his tower.
All clocks
deceive us.
Time at last has
horizons.

— Federico Garcia Lorca

Cut Saguaro Ten Years Out   3 comments

I took this image in September 2011 while on my first Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) nature walk. 
I was so appalled that someone cut off the top of this young (probably 35-40 years old) saguaro cactus.

Sadly, over the years, I have frequently seen this type of vandalism.

This Image, taken July 27, 2021, illustrates the resiliency of nature. — Image by kenne

Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns,
so that each small piece of her fabric reveals
the organization of the entire tapestry.

— Richard Feynman

 

View Of Lower Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

View from Phoneline Trail In Lower Sabino Canyon (Photomerge of Three Images) — Panorama by kenne

Butterflies And Desert Flowers After Monsoon Rains   2 comments

Surphur Butterflies on Creosole Bush Blossoms In Sabino Canyon (July 27, 2021) — Images by kenne 

The recent monsoon rains have greened up the canyon, bringing out a lot of butterflies.
Unfortunately, I only had my 18-70 mm lens, so trying to photograph
the mostly surphur butterflies became challenging.

— kenne

Giant Saguaro Cactus In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Giant Saguaro Cactus In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Along the mountain ridges,
      Across the desert floor;
      Arms like verdant armor,
      Stalwarts guard our door.
Shading for the lizard,
      Haven for the wren,
      Source of inspiration,
      For past and present men.

–Earl Bloss, “Saguaros,” in Arizona Highways, 1973

Cactus Wren   1 comment

Cactus Wren — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Photography comes from the moment

existing at the time it was created.”

— kenne

Cedar Waxwing Art   Leave a comment

Cedar Waxwing — Photo-Artistry by kenne

they come every spring

flights of these impressive birds

attracting birders

— kenne

Ready For Takeoff   1 comment

Ready for Takeoff (Cooper’s Hawk)– Image by kenne

ready for takeoff

flying comes naturally

not a leap of faith

— kenne

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