Archive for the ‘Birds’ Category

Expectations   Leave a comment

Desert 9799 Hummingbird art blogPainting by kenne (March 20, 2018)


Who are you
you who share
my very existence
with your expectations
sometimes calling them traditions
placing more value
on the worth of your expectations.
unwilling to understand
neither the what
nor the why
of my very being.

Who am I
I who share
your very existence
with my expectations
sometimes calling them logical
placing more value
on the worth of my expectations
unwilling to understand
neither the what
nor the why
of your very being.

Who are we
we who share
their very existence
with our expectations
sometimes calling them unconditional
placing more value
on the worth of our expectations
unwilling to understand
neither the what
nor the why
of their very being.

Who are they
they who share
our very existence
with their expectations
sometimes calling them laws
placing more value
on the worth of their expectations
unwilling to understand
neither the what
nor the why
of our very being.

Who are we
we who share
a universal existence
with our expectations
sometimes calling them just
placing more value
on the worth of all expectations
unwilling to understand
neither the what
nor the why
of a universal being.

— Kenne (November 2007)

Tubac Hawk Watch   Leave a comment

This is the time of year to witness migrating birds passing through the southeastern Arizona area. Among them is the common black hawk.

Tubac Hawk Watch-1355 blog

Tubac Hawk Watch-1342Even without the “big gun” lens some of my raptor photographer friends have, I have wanted to go to the Tubac Hawk Watch, which I was able to do this past Tuesday with Bill Kaufman.

I expected to be outgunned, by not having anything over 300+ mm lens, I still gave it my best shot.

Bill and I arrived about 8:15 am at the Ron Morriss Park in Tubac. Most of the birds of prey usually start taking flight between 9:00 am and noon, so we were surprised when some started coming out of the tree-line to the east minutes after we had arrived.

“Black Hawk Up”! “Black Hawk Up”! Became the cry as birders pointed cameras and binoculars to the sky.

Knowing that such a flight pattern near the tree-line would be good for me and my lesser lens (28-300 mm), I had already moved to a position near the tree-line. Even so, my images don’t begin to match up to the more powerful lenses.

Here’s one of my images, followed by one Bill Kaufman took.

Common Black Hawk-1287 blogImage by kenne

Common Black Hawk_Tubac Hawk Watch-20180313_0018_bImage by Bill Kaufman



Tubac Hawk Watch-1351 blogNed Harris, seated in the middle,
is my Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist mentor
and excellent raptor photographer.
Several of his photos are in Pete Dunne’s book, Birds of Prey.”

Tubac Hawk Watch-1353 blogBill Kaufman is second from the left.

untitled-1350.jpgImages by kenne

To force the pace and never to be still
Is not the way of those who study birds
Or women. The best poets wait for words.
The hunt is not an exercise of will
But patient love relaxing on a hill
To note the movement of a timid wing;
Until the one who knows that she is loved
No longer waits but risks surrendering –
In this the poet finds his moral proved
Who never spoke before his spirit moved.

— from “Poet, Lover, Birdwatcher” by Nissim Ezekiel



Luke, The Partial Albino Phainopepla   1 comment

Phainopepla (Luke)-1259 Framed blog“Luke” (Sabino Canyon, March 8, 2018) — Image by kenne

Naturalists in Sabino Canyon have been photographing a partial albino phainopepla for at least eight years.  He is known by the name “Luke” for leucistic, a condition in which there is partial loss of pigmentation in an animal. Over the years there has been a debate as to whether Luke’s condition is leucistic or a partial albino. I will leave it up to the experts.  

— kenne

An Active Osprey Nest   3 comments

Near where we were staying in Puerto Peñasco, I spotted what looked like an active Osprey nest.

Osprey-1144 blog II

After a closer investigation, I was able to see an osprey sitting this carefully created work of art. There are no trees on the desert coast of the Sea of Cortez, so the Osprey makes good use of any structure high off the ground.

Once confirming that the nest was active, I started looking around for the mate. That’s when a spotted the other osprey on a nearby power pole, already expressing some displeasure with my being too close to the nest.

Osprey-1146 blog

The two Ospreys began calling to one another. As I moved closer to the sentry Osprey, he turned and flow to a distant pole.

Osprey-1151 blog

The feathers of this hawk always seem ruffled due to when diving after fish, Ospreys completely submerge themselves underwater and still are able to fly away with their prey. Most other fish-eating birds of prey can only pluck fish from the surface of the water as they fly by. Like all birds of prey, Ospreys are amazing animals. 

— kenne

Anna’s Hummingbird   2 comments

Hummingbird - Youth blogFemale Anna’s Hummingbird — Image by kenne

Lack of rain in the Sonoran Desert has reduced the amount of food available for hummingbirds — very few wildflowers this year. But my lemon tree, which is in bloom has been attacking several of these small birds. Plus, I’m not sure how the warmer than normal has affected migration. 

Here in Tucson, you can see hummingbirds year-round in riparian areas and backyards. We are fortunate to have The Paton Center for Hummingbirds, a place to explore and experience the special birds of southeast Arizona. It is dedicated to the celebration and conservation of hummingbirds—and all of southeast Arizona’s astounding biodiversity—through recreation, education, and sustainable living.

— kenne

Desert Mockingbird   Leave a comment

Desert Mockingbird blogDesert Mockingbird in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

We cannot all see life in the same way.

— kenne

Wintering In The Canyon   9 comments

Ruby Crown Kinglet blogFemale Ruby Crowned Kinglet in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Right now, for reasons I have not been able to decern, pain is causing me to spend less time in Sabino Canyon. Months ago, before I got injured, I used to hike from one place to another, moving and accomplishing much. But now, no matter how much I try there is a voice slowing me down, bringing me home to this deeper wisdom that I am. A deeper wisdom is great, but I’m still trying to understand if the deeper wisdom is worth the trade-off.

— kenne

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