Archive for the ‘Birds’ Category

Cactus Wren   1 comment

Cactus Wren In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

What is a fish without a river?

What is a bird without a tree to nest in?

What is an Endangered Species Act without

any enforcement mechanism to ensure

their habitat is protected? It is nothing.

— Jay Inslee

 

Female Phainopepla Photo-Artistry   Leave a comment

Female Phainopepla — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“I look at the bird and only slowly over the years see it /

who has seen me from the first”

— from Hen Harrier Poems by Colin Simms

 

Hepatic Tanager   Leave a comment

Hepatic Tanager — Image by kenne

Some may try,
but it is not possible
to stop the river of life.

— kenne

A Standoff   2 comments

Birds On The Tuichi River, Bolivian Amazon (8/23/19) — Image by kenne

me ignoring you
    ignoring me.

— dmperez

 

David Lindo, The Urban Birder   Leave a comment

David LindoDavid Lindo (London, England), The Urban Birder at the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center — Image by kenne

As a blogger, I follow a lot of bloggers, mostly those into music, poetry,
and nature photography. One of my favorite blogs is Michael Stevenson’s “The Hobbledehoy.”  

Yesterday (08/09/20), Michael reblogged “A month in the life of The Urban Birder, David Lindo.
” Right away, I thought, “I know who David Lindo is.” Why do I know him?
In February of 2013, David presented to the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
in Tucson, Arizona.

I videoed the presentation, which was about 45 minutes. The idea was to make
it available in the SCVN library or on our website.
Well, without going into the details, it didn’t happen.

So, after Michael posted the article from Country Living,
I decided to reduce the length of his presentation and put it on YouTube.

This happening here in Tucson took place long before the Karens of the world were making news in Central Park.

— kenne

Yellow-eyed Junco On The Forest Floor   1 comment

SCVN Weds Walk 08-01-12Yellow-eyed Junco (Coronado National Forest) — Image by kenne

Yellow-eyed Juncos shuffle through the leaf litter of pine and pine-oak forests with fire in their eyes—
a bright yellow-orange gleam that instantly sets them apart from the more widespread
Dark-eyed Junco. Otherwise, they share many of the markings of the “Red-backed”
form of Dark-eyed Junco, including a gray head, two-toned bill, reddish-brown back,
and white outer tail feathers that flash when they fly. This specialty of the southwestern U.S.
also occurs in mountain forests through Mexico to Guatemala. — Source: allaboutbirds.org

Western Kingbird   1 comment

Western Kingbird-72Western Kingbird — Image by kenne

 

Anna’s Hummingbird   1 comment

Anna's Hummingbird-72Anna’s Hummingbird — Image by kenne

Named for the 19th-century Italian duchess Anna Massena, the
Anna’s hummingbird is one of only three hummingbird species
that are permanent residents of the United States and Canada.
(The others are the Allen’s and Costa’s.) This hardy hummingbird
has the northernmost year-round range of any North American
hummingbird species.

American Bird Conservancy

Birdfeeder   Leave a comment

Birdfeeder-art-72Birdfeeder — Photo-Artistry by kenne

If you don’t like something, change it.

If you can’t change it, change your attitude.

— Maya Angelou

Crested Caracara   1 comment

Crested Caracara-Art-72Crested Caracara — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Crested Caracaras are large birds with wingspans up to four feet. Males and females have the same plumage:
a black-topped head, a bare, reddish-orange face, and a white neck. The back and wings
are dark browns to black; the legs and talons are yellow. The underside of the wings has white tips.
The underside of the blacktail has white at the rump.  In-flight, caracaras could be mistaken for black vultures.
(Arizona Daily Independent)

Recently, my friend and fellow Sabino CanyonVolunteer Naturalist Ned Harris shared some of his recent
images of crested caracaras. He is an amazing photographer!
Check out Ted’s Flickr account. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ned_harris/

Ned Harris_W5A3105Crested Caracara On A Saguaro — Image by Ned Harris

A Young Visitor On Our Patio   9 comments

Cooper's Hawk-0-72A Visitor On The Patio (Immature Cooper’s Hawk) — Images by kenne

This immature Cooper’s Hawk perched on one of our patio chairs not far from the bird feeder frequented by doves for about one minute this morning. A mature hawk would have been up in the olive tree near the feeder. Even then, that doesn’t work as well as swooping from over the rooftop. They will learn. These images were taken through the patio door, which given the time of day the doors become a mirror.

— kenne

 

 

Serious Birders   Leave a comment

Serious Birders-72Serious Birders (Tubac, Arizona — March 2018) — Image by kenne

Scopes and cameras

Black hawks on the horizon

Serious birders.

— kenne

Posted February 25, 2020 by kenneturner in Birds, Information, Photography

Tagged with , ,

A Morning Birdwalk In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area (Slideshow)   2 comments

 

Bird Walk In Sabino CanyonA Morning Birdwalk In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Birdwatching Slideshow — Images by kenne

 

 

Being Content With Wakened Birds   Leave a comment

Eastern Blubird-0515-72Male Eastern Bluebird in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

She says, “I am content when wakened birds,

Before they fly, test the reality

Of misty fields, by their sweet questionings;

But when the birds are gone, and their warm fields

Return no more, where, then, is paradise?”

— from Sunday Morning by Wallace Stevens

 

A Summary and Analysis of Wallace Stevens’ ‘Sunday Morning’

Cedar Waxwings In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Cedar Waxwing (1 of 1)-12-72Cedar Waxwings — Images by kenne

Cedar Waxwing (1 of 1)-10-2-72

This time of year flocks of Cedar Waxwings descend on berry-laden trees and hedges in
Sabino Canyon. They are sociable at all seasons, and it is rare to see just one waxwing.
Occasionally a line of waxwings perched on a branch will pass a berry back and forth,
from bill to bill, until one of them swallows it.

— kenne

 

 

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