Archive for the ‘Houston’ Category

A Limpkin Near The Gulf Coast   1 comment

Limpkin — Image by Hugh Poland

“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only make them think.”

— Socrates

Four Houston Blues Legends   Leave a comment

Pete Mayes, Grady Gaines, Calvin Owens and Joe Guitar Hughes (1999)– Image by kenne

A Sunday Showcase of Some of Houston’s Blues Legends at Billy Blues BBQ Bar & Grill.

Remembering Mike Durbin   3 comments

Mike Durbin Talking To Blues Friends (Ken & Mary’s Blues Project, May 2017) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The Blues Project

They called it a project,
a Blues Project, but really,
it was a party — 
a party for
family and friends 
to share
happy times, 
talk about living life,
and a love for good old blues music.

Once this party began
there would be no stopping it,
even when forced undercover
of rain,
friends laugh and
talk 
about déjà vu the  
evening had become.

Just sitting on the front porch
doing that front porch thing
telling stories now embellished
by all the good times dancing
and singing the night away
in the woods off Old Houston Road.

The Blues Project may be over
so listen, the night will lead you
to the music, the stories told,
and smile one more time
for each house concert was just a
rehearsal
for what our tomorrow’s will bring.

— kenne

Kenneth Harris shares the story of how Ken & Mary’s Blues Project came about. (May 20, 2017)

Joy and Robin — A Memory Flashback   1 comment

Joy and Robin (Hannah, April 14, 2004) — Image by kenne
Been going through some old photos — it’s that time of year.

“Well it’s bad news from Houston, Half my friends are dying. ”    Leave a comment

Mr. V (James Vaughn) of Mr. & Mrs. V on Houston’s 90.1, KPFT — HDR Image by kenne

Mike Durbin of the Moe Hansum Band — Image by kenne

The Houston Blues community is feeling the pain. Two of the communities well known personallities past away this past week. To hornor the memory of these Houston friends, I’m sharing a Diunna Greenleaf video I posted several years ago — Growing Up and Growing Old in the Fellowship of Family and Friends.

— kenne

Great Blue Heron — Right Place, Right Time   1 comment

Great Blue Heron (East Park, Lake Houston –10-17-21) — Image by Hugh Poland

Great Blue Herons are the largest of the North American herons, standing tall over wetlands and shores of open water.
Great Blue Herons are blue-gray overall with a wide black stripe over their eye and a long yellow-orangish bill.
In flight their wings are two-toned with blueish forewings and black flight feathers, and their neck is usually coiled in,
unlike the similarly sized Sandhill Cranes.

 
Great Blue Herons are highly adaptable and can be found in marshes, swamps, shores, and tideflats. Some will even forage
in grasslands and agricultural fields. They have a general diet consisting of fish, frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes, insects, rodents,
and even other birds. Great Blue Herons will stand or walk slowly through shallow water before quickly striking with their long bill,
grabbing small prey or impaling large fish. Great Blue Herons nest in colonies, and usually build nests high in the trees,
but will occasionally nest on the ground or in low shrubs.

Bryce Loschen (Houston Audubon)

Houston Blues   Leave a comment

Houston Blues (The Rhythem Room, 2005) — B&W Collage by kenne

“Working in black and white makes me feel like a painter, not a photographer.
Shooting this way allows me to focus my attention on the light and shade, textures, shapes and expressions.
It’s really a matter of personal choice, but in my opinion black and white can lead to a more abstract reading of reality,
which is arguably more demanding and more challenging to produce. Here photographers cannot use flattering
colours or coloured light to distract the eye. You cannot cheat in black and white.”

— Guy Gagnon

Ben’s Den Tasting Room   Leave a comment

Gulf Coast Distillers — Image by kenne

While on the Houston leg of our road trip, we had dinner at Ben’s Den Tasting Room
with Katelyn, Janie, and David — a food truck provided the food menu.

In 1998, the De Aldecoa family bought the then memorable Uncle Ben’s Rice manufacturing facility
on Clinton Drive. Now the facility has been turned into a world-class coffee plant and distillery, expanding the
beverage imperium with the creation of the Gulf Coast Distillers.

Yes, the whisky I had was excellent.

— kenne

Houston Skyline Viewed From Buffalo Bayou Park   Leave a comment

Houston Skyline Viewed From Buffalo Bayou Park (August 26, 2021) — Image by kenne

We are now nearing the final leg of our road trip that began on August 7th. We have been in many states from
Arizona
to Maine and have taken hundreds of photos, many of which will later appear on this blog with my
observations.
We are now in Houston, our previous home, before moving to Tucson eleven years ago, visiting family and friends. 
On Thursday of this week, we had lunch at Birraporetti’s, an upscale and lavish Italian restaurant/Irish bar in
the
theater/business district for over 30 years. Because of the pandemic and especially the recent virus spike
in
the Houston area, there were only two other customers in this large eatery/bar. 
This was not surprising, however very sad.

— kenne

 

Pond Slider — No Words Friday   Leave a comment

Pond Slider (Lake Houston, October 25, 2013) — HDR Image by kenne

 

Follow Me Home   2 comments

Michael Stevenson has the blog The HOBBLEHOY.
Recently he posted a The Irish Times review of Rhiannon Gidden’s 
new album with Francesco Turrisi, “They’re Calling Me Home.

We first became aware of Giddens about 15 years ago as one of the founding members of the country,
blues, and old-time music band Carolina Chocolate Drops, where she is the lead singer, fiddle, and
banjo player. In 2008, we attended the annual Houston iFest where local and international musicians and the
“iFest New Artist of the Year,” the Carolina Chocolate Drops, were scheduled to appear.

Since then, this very talented musician and her unique artistry continue to blossom.

Carolina Chocolate Drops (April 2008) — Images by kenne

“For nearly a decade, Giddens has been heralded as a luminary in the world of Americana,
and for some time, she was one of the few African-American faces represented.”
— American Songwriter

There are no words for a voice that evokes so much complexity of emotion.
This music and video will transform you into a different place. — kenne

Down In Houston Blues   Leave a comment

Houston’s Little Joe Washington (April, 2008) — Image by kenne

“Personal inconvenience, experience, and environmental impact notwithstanding, a willingness to drive all over
and beyond Harris County has its rewards for the Houston blues aficionado wanting to make the rounds.
Not only is that travel necessary to access the various widely separated business establishments featuring live
performances on a weekly basis, but for those in the know, it’s also the key to experiencing some unique
presentations of the music — both of which evoke an earlier era.”

— Roger Wood (Down in Houston: Bayou City Blues, 2003)

Houston’s Shakespeare Pub   Leave a comment

Texas Johnny Brown at Houston’s Shakespeare Pub — Photo-Artistry by kenne 
(Click on Texas Johnny Brown to see archived blog posting on TJB)

Texas Johnny Brown is a major talent who simmered on the blues scene longer than all the beef stew cooked in the ’40s, the decade when he first began playing and recording. Like pianist Johnny Johnson of St. Louis, Brown is an artist who did not get a chance to record a full album as a leader until he had been in the music business more than half-a-century. Also like Johnson, the results of coming in so late in the game have been a pair of highly acclaimed, prize-winning albums including the righteous Blues Defender. Brown can take plenty of the credit, since he has taken over almost complete control of his ow arranging, production, and mixing, as well as the string bending and blues moaning. He began his career as a sideman for the Duke and Peacock outfits in the ’50s about which discographers make comments such as “… the record keeping at that time was less than desirable.” As a result, some of Brown’s playing on releases by artists such as Lightnin’ Hopkins and Joe Hinton remains uncredited. The guitarist, singer, and songwriter began his professional career as an original member of the great Amos Milburn band known as the Aladdin Chickenshackers. Brown’s picking is killer on early Aladdin recordings by both Milburn, and on Ruth Brown’s first Atlantic sides. Atlantic allowed Brown to make a few recordings of his own in 1949, buoyed by the enthusiasm the label had for Milburn, who played behind his sideman on these sessions along with the rest of the Aladdin Chickenshackers. T-Bone Walker is the dominating force in Brown’s stylistic palette, an influence that was considered something of a driving permit for any guitarist venturing out of Houston during this period. Before finally getting the biggie recording opportunities in the late ’90s, Brown did an ARC session in Houston in the early ’50s that was never released. He also performed regularly with Junior Parker during that decade, remaining based out of Houston. As a songwriter, Brown’s most famous work is “Two Steps from the Blues,” a big hit for Bobby “Blue” Bland, with whom he also toured as a lead guitarist in the ’50s and ’60s. By the ’80s, he was considered only sporadically active on the blues scene, but this turned out to be only a temporary brown-out, so to speak.

— Eugene Chadbourne Source: allmusic.com

Houston Skyline at Sam Houston Park   Leave a comment

Houston Skyline at Sam Houston Park — Image by kenne

“Houston is an example of what can happen when architecture catches a venereal disease.”

— Frank Lloyd Wright

Sherman — Come Away In   Leave a comment

Houston Blues Legend, Sherman Roberson — Image by kenne

Don’t tell me The Blues is not a feeling!

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