Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Let’s Dance!   2 comments

Credit…Louisa Gouliamaki/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Listening to NPR this morning, I learn that Greek composer and politician Mikis Theodorakis died Thursday at age 96.
Theodorakis’ music for the film Zorba the Greek became a worldwide shorthand for a seize-the-moment kind of joyfulness.

The music and the film scene still provide one of the most memorable scenes in my lifetime.

— kenne

Just Like The White-winged Dove   Leave a comment

White-winged Dove On Ocotillo — Image by kenne

Just like the white-winged dove
Sings a song, sounds like she’s singing
Ooh, ooh, ooh
Just like the white-winged dove
Sings a song, sounds like she’s singing
Ooh, baby, ooh, said ooh
And the days go by, like a strand in the wind
In the web that is my own, I begin again
Said to my friend, baby (everything stopped)
Nothin’ else mattered
He was no more than a baby then
Well, he seemed broken-hearted
Something within him
But the moment that I first laid
Eyes on him, all alone
On the edge of seventeen
Just like the white-winged dove
Sings a song, sounds like she’s singing
I said ooh, baby, ooh, said ooh
Just like the white-winged dove
Sings a song, sounds like she’s singing
I said ooh, baby, ooh, said ooh
 
— from Edge of Seventeen by Stevie Nicks
 
 

Everybody’s Talkin’ — Metal Art Structure On The Road To Santa Fe   3 comments

Metal Art On the Road to Santa Fe — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Everybody’s talkin’ at me
I don’t hear a word they’re saying
Only the echoes of my mind

People stopping, staring
I can’t see their faces
Only the shadows of their eyes

— from Everybody’s Talkin’ by Fred Neil

The Month Of May Fifty Years Out   1 comment

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

 

I can’t let this month get by without recognizing the 50th anniversary (May 21, 1971) of the release of Marvin Gaye’s
masterpiece album, What’s Going On.

“OK, let’s just get this out of the way. Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On LP is a masterpiece. If it’s not in your top five
or at least within the realm of your top 10 albums of all-time, then I seriously think you need to reevaluate your list.
Not many albums give you a snapshot of the world at the time of its release and still remain very relevant decades later.
What’s Going On most certainly does.” — Terry Nelson (albumism.com)

Gaye released the single, What’s Going On, after co-writer Renaldo “Obie” Benson saw police in Berkeley, Calif.,
brutality beat anti-Vietnam War protesters. Gaye would later say, “What mattered was the message. For the first time,
I felt like I had something to say.”

The album went platinum, and Rolling Stone would place it among the greatest albums of all time.
Now fifty years out, its influences are evident today as the nation wrestles with inequality and a racial reckoning.

— kenne

Follow Me Home   2 comments

Michael Stevenson has the blog The HOBBLEHOY.
Recently he posted a The Irish Times review of Rhiannon Gidden’s 
new album with Francesco Turrisi, “They’re Calling Me Home.

We first became aware of Giddens about 15 years ago as one of the founding members of the country,
blues, and old-time music band Carolina Chocolate Drops, where she is the lead singer, fiddle, and
banjo player. In 2008, we attended the annual Houston iFest where local and international musicians and the
“iFest New Artist of the Year,” the Carolina Chocolate Drops, were scheduled to appear.

Since then, this very talented musician and her unique artistry continue to blossom.

Carolina Chocolate Drops (April 2008) — Images by kenne

“For nearly a decade, Giddens has been heralded as a luminary in the world of Americana,
and for some time, she was one of the few African-American faces represented.”
— American Songwriter

There are no words for a voice that evokes so much complexity of emotion.
This music and video will transform you into a different place. — kenne

Down In Houston Blues   Leave a comment

Houston’s Little Joe Washington (April, 2008) — Image by kenne

“Personal inconvenience, experience, and environmental impact notwithstanding, a willingness to drive all over
and beyond Harris County has its rewards for the Houston blues aficionado wanting to make the rounds.
Not only is that travel necessary to access the various widely separated business establishments featuring live
performances on a weekly basis, but for those in the know, it’s also the key to experiencing some unique
presentations of the music — both of which evoke an earlier era.”

— Roger Wood (Down in Houston: Bayou City Blues, 2003)

The Blues On Campus   1 comment

The Blues On Campus (Lone Star College, Montgomery – 02/19/03) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“The blues are the roots and the other musics are the fruits.
It’s better keeping the roots alive,
because it means better fruits from now on.
The blues are the roots of all American music.
As long as American music survives, so will the blues.”

— Willie Dixon (1915–1992)

Anna B Savage — ‘An artist brave enough to show vulnerability . . .’   Leave a comment

Anna B Savage — Source: Music&Riots

London-based singer-songwriter has completed a new project,”A Common Turn.”
In Clash Magazine, Jamie Wilde begins her review:
“Michelle Obama once said that to “dare to be vulnerable”
is to break down barriers and show others who you really are.
With Anna B Savage, this quote can be applied explicitly throughout her
tenderly captivating and embracingly
vulnerable debut album ‘A Common Turn’.”
An artist brave enough to show vulnerability . . .

Here’s a link to the full album — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpymbnIc1YY

Ground Zero Blues Club   Leave a comment

Ground Zero Blues Club Memphis (01/21/10) — Abstract Art by kenne

“There are only two kinds of songs; 
there’s the blues,
and there’s zip-a-dee-doo-dah.”

— Townes Van Zandt

Another Glass Of Wine My Dear   Leave a comment

Another Glass Of Wine My Dear (April 5, 2007) — Image by kenne

Have Some Medeira, M’dear

She was young, she was pure, she was new, she was nice
She was fair, she was sweet seventeen.
He was old, he was vile, and no stranger to vice
He was base, he was bad, he was mean.
He had slyly inveigled her up to his flat
To view his collection of stamps,
And he said as he hastened to put out the cat,
The wine, his cigar and the lamps:
Have some madeira, m’dear.
You really have nothing to fear.
I’m not trying to tempt you, that wouldn’t be right,
You shouldn’t drink spirits at this time of night.
Have some madeira, m’dear.
It’s really much nicer than beer.
I don’t care for sherry, one cannot drink stout,
And port is a wine I can well do without…
It’s simply a case of chacun a son gout
Have some madeira, m’dear.
Unaware of the wiles of the snake-in-the-grass
And the fate of the maiden who topes,
She lowered her standards by raising her glass,
Her courage, her eyes and his hopes.
She sipped it, she drank it, she drained it, she did!
He promptly refilled it again,
And he said as he secretly carved one more notch
On the butt of his gold-headed cane:
Have some madeira, m’dear,
I’ve got a small cask of it here.
And once it’s been opened, you know it won’t keep.
Do finish it up.
It will help you to sleep.
Have some madeira, m’dear.
It’s really an excellent year.
Now if it were gin, you’d be wrong to say yes
The evil gin does would be hard to assess..
Besides it’s inclined to affect me prowess,
Have some madeira, m’dear.
Then there flashed through her mind what her mother had said
With her antepenultimate breath,
“Oh my child, should you look on the wine that is red
Be prepared for a fate worse than death!”
She let go her glass with a shrill little cry,
Crash!
Tinkle! it fell to the floor;
When he asked,
“What in Heaven?”
She made no reply,
Up her mind, and a dash for the door.
Have some madeira, m’dear.
Rang out down the hall loud and clear
With a tremulous cry that was filled with despair,
As she fought to take breath in the cool midnight air,
Have some madeira, m’dear.
The words seemed to ring in her ear.
Until the next morning, she woke in her bed
With a smile on her lips and an ache in her head…
And a beard in her lug ‘ole that tickled and said:
Have some madeira, m’dear!

Flanders and Swann




Houston’s Shakespeare Pub   Leave a comment

Texas Johnny Brown at Houston’s Shakespeare Pub — Photo-Artistry by kenne 
(Click on Texas Johnny Brown to see archived blog posting on TJB)

Texas Johnny Brown is a major talent who simmered on the blues scene longer than all the beef stew cooked in the ’40s, the decade when he first began playing and recording. Like pianist Johnny Johnson of St. Louis, Brown is an artist who did not get a chance to record a full album as a leader until he had been in the music business more than half-a-century. Also like Johnson, the results of coming in so late in the game have been a pair of highly acclaimed, prize-winning albums including the righteous Blues Defender. Brown can take plenty of the credit, since he has taken over almost complete control of his ow arranging, production, and mixing, as well as the string bending and blues moaning. He began his career as a sideman for the Duke and Peacock outfits in the ’50s about which discographers make comments such as “… the record keeping at that time was less than desirable.” As a result, some of Brown’s playing on releases by artists such as Lightnin’ Hopkins and Joe Hinton remains uncredited. The guitarist, singer, and songwriter began his professional career as an original member of the great Amos Milburn band known as the Aladdin Chickenshackers. Brown’s picking is killer on early Aladdin recordings by both Milburn, and on Ruth Brown’s first Atlantic sides. Atlantic allowed Brown to make a few recordings of his own in 1949, buoyed by the enthusiasm the label had for Milburn, who played behind his sideman on these sessions along with the rest of the Aladdin Chickenshackers. T-Bone Walker is the dominating force in Brown’s stylistic palette, an influence that was considered something of a driving permit for any guitarist venturing out of Houston during this period. Before finally getting the biggie recording opportunities in the late ’90s, Brown did an ARC session in Houston in the early ’50s that was never released. He also performed regularly with Junior Parker during that decade, remaining based out of Houston. As a songwriter, Brown’s most famous work is “Two Steps from the Blues,” a big hit for Bobby “Blue” Bland, with whom he also toured as a lead guitarist in the ’50s and ’60s. By the ’80s, he was considered only sporadically active on the blues scene, but this turned out to be only a temporary brown-out, so to speak.

— Eugene Chadbourne Source: allmusic.com

I’m A Rover   Leave a comment

Ye Vagabonds LP 

I love British folk music — enjoy.

Posted February 3, 2021 by kenneturner in British, Information, Music, video

Tagged with , , ,

Shrimp boats is a-coming’   Leave a comment

Galveston Bay — Image by kenne

Oh…
(CHORUS):
Shrimp boats is a-comin’
Their sails are in sight
Shrimp boats is a-comin’
There’s dancin’ tonight
Why don’t ‘cha hurry hurry hurry home
Why don’t ‘cha hurry hurry hurry home
Look here! The shrimp boats is a-comin’
There’s dancin’ tonight
(Shrimp boats is a-comin’, there’s dancin’ tonight)
:
They go to sea with the evenin’ tide
And the women folk wave their good-bye
(There they go… There they go)
While the Louisiana moon floats on high
And they wait for the day when they can cry…
:
Happy the days while they’re mending the nets
‘Til once more they ride out to sea
(There they go… There they go)
Then how lonely the nights will be
‘Til that wonderful day when they sing…
:
Happy the days while they’re mending the nets
‘Til once more they ride out to sea
(There they go… There they go)
Then how lonely the nights will be
‘Til that wonderful day when they sing…
(Shrimp boats is a-comin’ – there’s dancin’
There’s dancin’ There’s dancin’ There’s dancin’ …)
Shrimp boats is a-comin’ – there’s dancin’ tonight!
 
— Source: LyricFind
 
 

“Who’s Yellen Now?”   1 comment

Janet Yellen — Source: Getty Images

This is way too much!
This is way too good!

Biden: Yellen needs a “Hamilton” musical. Dessa: Here you go.

Sherman — Come Away In   Leave a comment

Houston Blues Legend, Sherman Roberson — Image by kenne

Don’t tell me The Blues is not a feeling!

%d bloggers like this: