Archive for the ‘Quote’ Tag

Palm Berries   Leave a comment

Palm Berries-Art-72Palm Berries — Photo-Artistry by kenne

We are not alone.

The world is changing,

and we are part of the transformation.

— Paulo Coelho

Sonoran Skyway –Edward Abbey   Leave a comment

Winter In The Desert 2010 10816-Edit-1-72Sonoran Sky Island — Images by kenne

“I feel again the poignant urge to grasp it, embrace it, know all
at once and all in all; but the harder I strive for such a consummation,
the more elusive that it becomes, slipping like a dream through my
arms. Can this desire be satisfied only in death? Something in our
human consciousness seems to make us forever spectators of
the world we live in.

Maybe some of my crackpot, occultist friends are right; maybe we
really are aliens here on earth, our spirits born on some other,
simpler, more human planet. But why were we sent here?
What is our mission, comrades, and when do we get paid?

A writer’s epitaph: He fell in love with the planted earth,
but the affair was never consummated.”

— Edward Abbey

“To the consternation of the “committed” reviewer, he is not a
conservationist or an environmentalist or a boxable list of any other
kind; he keeps on showing up as Edward Abbey, a horse of another
color, and one that requires some care to appreciate.”

— from “A Few Words in Favor of Ed Abbey” by Wendell Berry

Desert Eye Sunset II blog framed IIISonoran Desert Eye

“He had the zeal of a true believer and the sting of a scorpion.”

— Wallace Stegner referring to Edward Abbey

Cactus Blossom — Photo-Artistry   1 comment

Cactus Blossom Photo-ArtistryCactus Blossom — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Life is like a cactus, prickly but very beautiful.

John Lewis, Dead at Age 80   1 comment

I want to see young people in America feel the spirit of the 1960s
and find a way to get in the way. To find a way to get in trouble.
Good trouble, necessary trouble.

–John Lewis

John Lewis-art-72John Lewis, Dead At Age 80 — Photo-Artistry by kenne

I came of age in the 1960s, a time of national unrest centering around civil rights and the Vietnam War. I served three years in the Army during the Vietnam War era, marched and demonstrated for peace and justice. Now nearing my 80th birthday, I remember will the assassinations John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy while embracing the “Beat” generation, its writers, and beliefs.

Having lived in Alabama in the 40s, I couldn’t help but notice state troopers and county posse men attacking the unarmed marchers with billy clubs and tear gas after they passed over the county line. The event became known as Bloody Sunday (March 7, 1965). After Bloody Sunday, President Johnson and Congress began working on a voting rights law on March 15.

A third march started on March 2, averaging 10 miles a day, the marchers marched “Jefferson Davis Highway” from Salma to Montgomery.  The marchers arrived in Montgomery on March 24 and at the Alabama State Capitol on March 25. With thousands having joined the campaign, 25,000 people entered the capital city that day in support of voting rights.

The route is memorialized as the “Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail”, and is designated as a U.S. National Historic Trail. The Voting Rights Act became law on August 6, 1965.

“On the front lines of the bloody campaign to end Jim Crow laws, with blows to his body and a fractured skull to prove it, John Lewis was a valiant stalwart of the civil rights movement and the last surviving speaker from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963.”

He died on the same day as did another civil rights stalwart, the Rev. C.T. Vivian, a close associate of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

For Rep. Lewis, the Black Lives Movement was a very moving experience, “. . . very moving to see hundreds of thousands of people from all over America and around the world take to the streets — to speak up, to speak out, to get into what I call ‘good trouble.” John Lewis was a genuine “profile in courage.”

“When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair,
you have a moral obligation to say something,”
he said on the House floor, December 2019, to impeach President Trump.
“To do something. Our children and their children will ask us,
‘What did you do? What did you say?’
For some, this vote may be hard. But we have a mission
and a mandate to be on the right side of history.”

— kenne

Clouds   1 comment

Clouds (1 of 1)-Edit-1-72Clouds — Image by kenne

“Art is not difficult because it wishes to be difficult,

but because it wishes to be art.”

— Donald Barthelme

Giant Swallowtail   Leave a comment

Pipevine Butterfly & Pool Area LinksGiant Swallowtail (Tanuri Ridge)– Image by kenne

It is not explanations that carry us forward,

it is our will to proceed.

— Paulo Coelho

 

Mr. Gino’s Lounge   Leave a comment

Mr. VDancing to the Blues at Houston’s, Mr. Gino’s Lounge (03/09/08) — Image by kenne

 

The Blues

“The fundamental form in all of American music —
that’s what the blues is. It’s in every folk song,
The sound of the banjo and the sound of the guitar.
It’s in the sound of ragtime, it’s  in the sound of
John Philip Sousa’s marches. It’s hard to get the 
blues out of your sound. Blues is also call and
response, which is democratic form. It generally
has lyrics that described something tragic or sad.
But many times it reverses that and gives you
something that’s hopeful.”

— Wynton Marsalis (NY Times, June 28, 2020)

 

Joy   2 comments

Joy-11-30-05-art-72Joy — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Came but for friendship, and took away love.

— Thomas Moore

Ensenada Bay Sunset   1 comment

Ensenada Bay Sunset-art-72Ensenada Bay Sunset (01/07/07) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The sea,

once it casts its spell,

holds one in its net forever.

— Jacques Cousteau

Old Shed and John   Leave a comment

Willow Springs Ranch-8226-B&W-72“Old Shed and John” — Image by kenne

There are moments in life
When the only possible option is to lose control.

–Paulo Coelho

Down In Houston Blues   Leave a comment

DownInHouston-art-72Down In Houston Blues — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“For the latter half of the twentieth century, Houston has been home to what the
sociologist Robert D. Bullard has identified as perhaps, ‘the largest block community
in the South.’ More to the point, as David Nelson says in an editorial in Living Blues magazine,
the city is also the birthplace for ‘some of the most significant developments in modern blues.'” 

— from Down In Houston-Bayou City Blues by Roger Woods

Ventana Canyon Panorama   Leave a comment

Ventana Canyon-Pano-72Ventana Canyon — Panorama by kenne
(In this image, you see the Tucson basin with the Santa Rita Mountains in the distance.)

“Life is like riding a Bicycle.

To keep your balance,

you must keep moving.”

— Albert Einstein

Doubtful Pass Signposts   Leave a comment

Doubtful Canyon Weekend Dec 2012Doubtful Pass Signposts –  Image by kenne

The trouble with our age is all signposts and no destination.

Louis Kronenberger

Hiking Boots Off The Trail For Now   1 comment

HickingBoots-72Hiking Boots Off The Trail For Now — Image by kenne

At every moment if our lives

we have one foot in a fairy tale

and the other in the abyss.

— Paulo Coelho

 

 

Bird In The Tree   3 comments

Luke --2 framed painting“Bird In The Tree” (Phainopepla, Sabino Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Insight is not a light bulb that goes off inside our heads.

It is a flickering candle that can easily be snuffed out.

— Malcolm Gladwell

%d bloggers like this: