Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Recreation Area’ Tag

Rancho Fundoshi Above Bear Canyon Creek   Leave a comment

Rancho Fundoshi Above Bear Canyon Creek — Images by kenne

“Where I was born and where and
how I have lived is unimportant.
It is what I have done with where I
have been that should be of interest.”

— Georgia O’Keeffe

In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area, if you hike to Seven Falls, you walk the Bear Canyon road to Bear Canyon trail,
which crosses the Bear Canyon creek seven times. South of the trailhead sets a house on a cliff above the creek
outside the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area. Since 2010, I have hiked to Seven Falls several times and may
have noticed the house but was more focused on the hike. 

Yesterday, a group of us older, now slow hikers hiked the newly paved Bear Canyon road to the Bear Canyon trailhead,
taking a trail south to get a better view of the house on the cliff, where I took a few images of the house.
After discussing the possible owners, I decided to do a Google search once I got home. I first did a drag & drop
in Google Images with no match. So, started a Google search using a few descriptors. I learned that
about 65 years ago, Jack Segurson, a local high school wrestling, and swimming coach and teacher from the 1950s
into the late 1980s, bought the 151-acre property that he lived on, cherished, and mold into a
naturalist’s paradise — it became become his legacy. 

Segurson died at age 90 in 2011, and soon afterward, an appraiser valued his land at $3.9 million.
He left the property to The Nature Conservancy with restrictions that it never be sold or developed.
The Nature Conservancy donated the property, which Segurson named “Rancho Fundoshi,” a fundoshi
is a Sumo wrestler’s loincloth to Pima County. The Pima County Regional Flood Control District
manages the property as open space and owns and manages other lands along Bear Canyon
and Sabino Canyon as part of its riparian habitat and upper watershed preservation program.

— kenne

Trailing Windmills Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Trailing Windmills — Image by kenne

The orchid-colored trailing windmills is a vine that grows along the ground; the plant may be 10 feet across.
The stems, leaves, and buds are covered with soft white hair. The stems and flowers are sticky, and one rarely finds
a flower without grains of sand stuck on the upper surface. Technically, what appears to be 1 flower is a cluster
of 3 resembling a single radially symmetrical flower but no one but a trained botanist would ever guess it.
— Source: wildflower.org

Spring Break At Seven Falls   Leave a comment

Spring Break At Seven Falls in the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area — HDR Image by kenne

May my feet always touch the earth

Stretching from the desert to the mountains

While I’m still able to hike on the rocks

Made by fire and time.

— kenne

 

Desert Cottontail In The Brush   Leave a comment

Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus auduboni (Sabino Canyon Recreational Area) — Image by kenne

The desert portion of their common name arises from their distribution across the arid lands of the
American Southwest and Plains states. “Auduboni” honors John James Audubon,
the famous bird painter and naturalist. 

Back-Tailed Gnatcatcher   Leave a comment

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Black-tailed gnatcatchers are found throughout Mexico and the southwest United States in North America.
These birds inhabit the Sonoran desert, which covers California and Arizona in the United States. Their range also
extends to the northwestern part of Mexico. Their range is found in the Chihuahuan desert which covers the western part
of Texas, the southeastern part of Arizona, and extends to the northern and central part of the Mexican plateau,
in the range of the Sonoran desert in the west. Migration is not seen in these birds during the winter season. Source: kidadl.com

 

Death In The Canyon   Leave a comment

Dead Saguaro In Sabino Canyon (January 15, 2014) — Image by kenne

The skin is the first to go
in the beginning protected 
from the sun by a nurse tree.

This symbol of the Sonoran Desert
so slow to grow in the beginning
going unnosed for years
in the shadows of the nurse tree.

We teach children about this icon
by having the guess the age
of a saguago based on its heigh.

— kenne

Winter Wren In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

Winter Wren In Sabino Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“‘Hear! hear!’ screamed the jay from a neighboring tree,
where I had heard a tittering for some time,
‘winter has a concentrated and nutty kernel,
if you know where to look for it.'”

– Henry David Thoreau

Cedar Waxwings Sharing Food   Leave a comment

Cedar Waxwings Sharing Food In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Plenty of berries

Here in Sabino Canyon

For migrating birds.

— kenne

Desert Spiny Lizard — Getting A Little Sun   Leave a comment

Desert Spiny Lizard — Getting A Little Sun (Sabino Canyon Recreation Area) — Image by kenne

Cooper’s Hawk   Leave a comment

Cooper’s Hawk In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

A beautiful bird

And a super partiture

Love dive booming doves

— kenne

Thurber’s Wild Cotton Blossoms Art   Leave a comment

Thurber’s Wild Cotton Blossoms (Sabino Canyon Recreation Area) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Let us not look back in anger, nor forward in fear, but around in awareness.

— James Thurber

Looking Back To Spring of 2011   Leave a comment

Originally posted April 2011 on Becoming is Superior to Being. — kenne

“The only thing we can perceive are our perceptions. In other words, consciousness is the matrix upon which
the cosmos is apprehended. Color, sound, temperature, and the like exist only as perceptions in our head,
not as absolute essences. In the broadest sense, we cannot be sure of an outside universe at all.” — George Berkeley

Artist Along Sabino Creek In Sabino Canyon, April, 2011 — Image by kenne

Water

Pressure of sun on the rockslide
Whirled me in dizzy hop-and-step descent,
Pool of pebbles buzzed in a Juniper shadow,
Tiny tongue of a this-year rattlesnake flicked,
I leaped, laughing for little boulder-color coil–
Pounded by heat raced down the slabs to the creek
Deep tumbling under arching walls and stuck
Whole head and shoulders in the water:
Stretched full on cobble–ears roaring
Eyes open aching from the cold and faced a trout.

 — Gary Snyder in Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems

The poem originally appeared Riprap, which was Snyder’s first book of poetry. For Snyder, nature as divine, which goes hand-in-hand with the biocentric nature of his Buddhist beliefs.

— kenne

Pandemic Kids In The Canyon   4 comments

Pandemic Kids (1st Graders) In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area — Image by kenne

In the last week of October, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) began offering nature classes to elementary school children
four days a week, the first time since March 2020. The number of children per day is a maximum of 30 students that are
divided into six groups. Masks are required except where social distancing is possible. The children have been perfect about
wearing masks, even though it may not be a school requirement. Some field trips have been canceled due to COVID outbreaks at the schools.
All the SCVN members have been vaccinated. Still, some naturalists have tested positive and have been self-quarantining.

— kenne

Thurber’s Cotton   Leave a comment

Thurber’s Cotton with Bee (Sabino Canyon) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The cup-shaped flowers are 1 1/2 inches (3.8 cm) wide and have 5 broad, white petals that fade to pink as they age.
The petals are either solid white or streaked with pink at the base. The flowers are followed by round, green seed capsules that dry
to a brown color and split open to reveal the seeds and only a few, sparse cotton fibers. This plant is related to cultivated cotton,
but its cotton is too paltry for commercial use. The leaves are green and palmately lobed with 3 or 5 point-tipped lobes.
The leaves turn a bright red color in the fall (around late October). Source: fireflyforest.com

Greater Roadrunner   Leave a comment

Greater Roadrunner (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

The desert is human
endeavour’s most fitting graveyard;
 
the slow bleaching,
the gradual eroding into sand,
the heat stifling sound as it leaps into the air.
IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE. But it always does.
 
— from Roadrunners by André Naffis-Sahely

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