Archive for the ‘Sabino Creek’ Tag

A November Hike To Hutch’s Pool   2 comments

Fall Colors Along Sabino Creek Hiking to Hutch’s Pool — Panorama by kenne

One of my favorite hikes is to Hutch’s Pool. In the past, the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
would guide a fall and spring hike, each hike having a many as 15 hikers.
However, like so many things, not this fall because of the pandemic.
The trail is open, but not for groups.

— kenne

* * * * *

I bear many scars,

but I also carry with me moments

that would not have happened

if I had not dared 

to go beyond my limits.

— Paulo Coelho

Crossing Sabino Creek Below Hutch’s Pool — Image by kenne

 

Sabino Creek — Ash From The Bighorn Fire   1 comment

Sabino Creek — Ash From The Bighorn Fire — Image by kenne

It happens that I get tired
of revolutionary cafes
and peacock poets
of narcissistic reflexives
and the songs of the deaf.

It happens that I am terrified
by this hardened generation
that rushes out in search of absolutes
fashions names and blasphemies,
doctrinizes on the pros and cons
of armed struggle,
and meditates, with a beer in its hand
and a sour cry on its lips
on the cadavers of others

Who are  we?
Those same parishioners perhaps
who come and go indifferent
along the streets
on the Day of the Dead
with our hands full
of death’s-head cakes
and our hearts in ashes.

— from Day of the Dead In June by Lucha Corpi

A Recent Drive Up The Catalina Highway To Ski Valley   3 comments

Yesterday (08/05/20), I drove up the Catalina Highway to Mt. Lemmon. The highway was opened to the general public last Saturday morning for the first time since the Bighorn Fire began in early June. The mountain town of Summerheaven, successfully protected from the fire, is now open for business, although still having to follow HOVID-19 business regulations in Arizona.

Oricle Ridge-72Oracle Ridge and Mt. Lemmon Fire Station

Before entering Summerheaven, there are two ridges going north; Red Ridge and Oracle Ridge. Both ridges were severely burned during the 2003 Aspen Fire that destroyed almost all the homes in Summerheaven. Over the years since the Aspen Fire, the forest canopy has still not returned on these ridges. However, a lot of ground cover containing some bushes and small trees had returned. On June 17th, the two ridges were again burned. On June 19th, I posted two time-delay videos of the fire coming through the area pictured in the above photo. The fire station and most of the pines behind it were spared — not true of the storage building and new growth since the 2003 fire. It has now been 50 days since the fire occurred. Note how green the scared area has become with the return of ferns on the mountain slopes.

Except for the highway and Summerheaven, the public is not allowed to go anywhere in the National Forest. From what I was able to observe from the highway, most of the hiking trails with trailheads near the highway are ok, at least partially. Parts of Lower Butterfly Trail and Green Mountain Trail don’t look good from a distance.

My guess is that the trails in the forest around Summerheaven were burned like the two ridges north of Summerheaven. From a review of burn scar maps, the Marshall Gulch area to the north and west, which would include Carter Canyon, has been badly burned. For those of you who hike this area, It’s possible a lot of the Marshall and Mint Springs trails were destroyed. We may not know until November.

Since Sabino Creek originates along the Marshall Gulch Trail, the monsoon rains can result in a lot of potential flash flooding coming down through Sabino Canyon. So far, the rain amounts are very below average, but we are still in the monsoon season.

— kenne

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Images Taken From Catalina Highway by kenne

 

Sabino Creek Has Two Ducks   Leave a comment

ducks-1253-72Sabino Creek Has Two Ducks — Image by kenne

Sabino creek has two ducks.

Winter rains and spring

Snowmelt on the mountains

Increasing the streamflow

Of a frequently dry creek

Attracting additional waterfowl.

— kenne

Sabino Creek, February 2020   1 comment

Sabino Creek-72Sabino Creek Below The Dam In Sabino Canyon — Image and video by kenne

Sabino Creek Art   Leave a comment

Sabino Creek-Edit-3-art-72Sabino Creek Art — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Sabino Creek

Spring brings the sound of

Water running in the creek

Deer walk to the edge.

— kenne

Moments Alone   Leave a comment

Romero Pools“Moments Alone” (Sabino Creek) — Image by kenne

Moments alone 

looking for answers

in deep caverns

of my soul,

only to see them

blurred by others

as water 

in the stream

of life

rushes by.

— kenne

Panning For Garnets   Leave a comment

Thursday Elementary January 24, 2019-11-Infrared-72Students Panning For Garnets In Sabino Creek — Infrared Image by kenne

One of the programs taught by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to elementary
school children is geology called “Strike It Rich.” They learn how the Santa Catalina
Mountains were formed and the minerals contained in the “gneiss” rock.
The primary
activity is panning for garnets (sand rubies) in Sabino Creek.
The students uncovered the link between the towering granite cliffs
above the Tucson Basin and all that lies below.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Nature Program For Elementary School Students   Leave a comment

One of the subjects we teach is geology, how the Santa Catalina Mountains were
formed, and the importance of water in the formation of Sabino Canyon. Twelve
million years ago, the Santa Catalina Mountains were just a range of hills, but the
earth’s crust in western North America was being stretched. What resulted were
huge blocks with steep vaults forming an up-and-down landscape called the
Basin and Range Province. 

Kenne & 3rd Grade Students-72Naturalist, Kenne Turner with 3rd Grade Students (Sabino Canyon Dam Area)
— Images by Teacher

Sabino Canyon is composed of a hard metamorphic rock called “Catalina gneiss.”
Gneiss contains rock and five minerals; quartz, mica, feldspar, magnetite, and garnets.
Over time water and earthquakes have eroded the gneiss rock carrying smaller rocks
and minerals down streams like Sabino Creek. The minerals are deposited along the
creek edges, which created a natural laboratory to learn about the minerals by panning
for garnets. Need I say, kids love panning for garnets.    

Kenne&3rd Grade Students-72Students panning for garnets in Sabino Creek.

“For many Tucsonans, the canyon is an old friend. We are on a first-name basis.
On a sunny weekend morning, we say, simply, “Let’s go to Sabino.

— from Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis by David Wentworth Lazaroff

View Of Sabino Canyon Dam Area   Leave a comment

Sabino Canyon Dam Area-72View of Sabino Canyon Dam Area — Image by kenne

The view from the top

A creek carrying snowmelt

Spring flowers emerge.

— kenne

 

Sabino Dam, January 2020   Leave a comment

Sabino Damin the Winter-72.jpgSabino Dam, January 2020 — Image by kenne

A crown of gold
over water flowing
from recent snow
melting on Mt. Lemmon.

Down by the creek banks
water a fading red residue
from the leaves of fall now
under the mountain snow.

Now and then
pieces of the crown
slowly begin to fall
leaving a nakedness.

Alone a trail above the dam
visitors walk near the water
drawn by nature’s presence
exchanging moment mysteries.

— kenne

 

New Year At Sabino Creek Dam   1 comment

Sabino Dam Panorama-72

Sabino Creek is flowing in the new year due to some winter rains
and new snow melting in the mountains. — Images by kenne

 

Fall Colors In The Desert Winter #2   Leave a comment

Sabino Canyon Cottonwoods - 72Fall Colors Along Sabino Creek in Winter (January 2020) — Image by kenne

Water in the creek
Frost at night in the canyon
Color cottonwoods.

— kenne

Fall Drifting Away   Leave a comment

Fall Drafting Away-Painting-72“Fall Drifting Away” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Fall drifting away

On the creek above the dam

Filtered through the sun.

— kenne

A Dry Sabino Creek   Leave a comment

Thursday Elementary-11 -Sabino CreekA Dry Sabino Creek In Sabino Canyon Recreation Area (October 17, 2019) — Image by kenne

Once upon a time
Water flowed over
Large and small
Boulders now left
Bathing in the sun
Thirsting for a kiss
From mountain water
Now gone underground.

— kenne

 

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