Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists’ Tag

Aspen Loop One Year Out After The Big Horn Fire   5 comments

SCVN Friday hikes on Mt. Lemmon have

Begun with more excitement than usual,

Last year’s hikes being a casualty of the

Big Horn Fire and the pandemic.

Marshall Gulch #3

Marshall Gulch Parking Area

Leaving behind morning temperatures

In the mid-eights, we gathered at Marshall Gulch

To hike the Aspen Loop, combining the Aspen

And Marshall Gulch trails for a 4.3-mile hike.

 

Marshall Gulch survived the fire, as did

Most of the trail. But the Aspen Trail

Wasn’t so lucky with parts that burned

From the 1993 Aspen Fire burning again.

Aspen Trail (June 15, 2015)

Over the years, I watch aspens and pines

And many other native plants return

Among the charred remains of the Aspen Fire

Only now to experience that same fate.

Last year’s fires were followed by the driest year

On record, delaying the reclamation process

And trail clearing to provide for safe hiking

On the grayest powder covering the trails.

The mountain ferns were among the plants

To return only weeks after containing the fire,

Providing hope to those grieving over the lose

Of so much beauty found on these mountain trails.

Now so exposed, the trail seems longer

Each step requiring a watchful eye

For this out of shape hiker, navigating

The loose gravel and ankle turning rocks.

Just beyond the ridge, a line of trees

Was missed by the very erratic wildfire

As if it turned on a dime, redirecting

The firefighting crew from Montana.

Soon the trail turns away from the freshly

Scared land rambling among tall ponderosas

Shadows formed by the whole clear

Cloudless sky moving across the trail.

Images by kenne

I’ve hiked the trails on Mt. Lemmon

Now ten summers, where troubles cease,

untangled silent knowledge contemplating

A void in a world that exceeds stillness.

— kenne

Naturalists To Resume Mountain Hikes   Leave a comment

SCVN Friday Hikes In The Santa Catalina Mountains To Resume This Summer — Image from 2017

The last Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) hike was March 2020. The National Forest Service has authorized the SCVN to begin Friday Hikes this June on Mt. Lemmon. The Forest Service will require all volunteers to wear masks at all times while volunteering. The groups will be smaller and maintain social distancing.

— kenne

Missing The Kids In The Canyon   1 comment

Elementary School Class In Sabino Canyon (February, 2012) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Since March of 2020 Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have not bee working with students on field trips
in the Tucson area. We are hoping to start offering nature classes again this fall. Meanwhile, SCVN has developed
a series of videos called The Canyon Classroom covering some of the “Fun Facts” covering the history, geology,
ecology, and wildlife of Sabino Canyon.

(Original image provided by the teacher.)

— kenne

Two Visitors Waddle By   Leave a comment

Two Visitors Waddle By (04-15-15) — Image by kenne

A Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist is teaching kids as two mallard ducks waddle by.
Nothing like being outdoors in nature’s classroom.

Behold the duck.
It does not cluck.
A cluck it lacks.
It quacks.
It is specially fond
Of a puddle or pond.
When it dines or sups,
It bottoms ups.

 
— Ogden Nash

Sabino Canyon — Thank You   1 comment

‘Thank You’ Art from Children Who Went On Field Trips To Sabino Canyon Before The Pandemic

It has now been over a year since teachers have brought students to Sabino Canyon — they are dearly missed! We are hoping that by October, our normal five days a week schedule will return. 

Meanwhile, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists have been busy creating videos for the Sabino Canyon – The Canyon Classroom. Check it out and Subscribe.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Goes Virtual   Leave a comment

Teaching Elementary School Students Geology in Sabino Canyon (January 2019) 

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) stopped offering their Elementary School Nature program in March of 2020 because of the pandemic. Since teachers are no longer able to bring their students to the canyon, SCVN has begun creating a series of videos, Sabino Canyon, The Canyon Classroom, and placed them on YouTube.

Several videos have been created to date. The most recent one is Harvester Ants.

Naturalist Jeff Hahn with Elementary School Students — Images by kenne

Missing The Kids In The Sabino Canyon   2 comments

Kenne with Elementary School Kids In Sabino Canyon — Image by Teacher

Starting in October of each year Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
teach elementary school kids about nature five days a week, However, because
of the pandemic classes will not be coming to Sabino Canyon till at least next October. 

— kenne

Sabino Canyon To Reopen With Partial Services   3 comments

CJ Woodard, Santa Catalina District Ranger

On Friday, September 18, 2020, District Ranger conducted a guided tour for Partner members ahead of the Scheduled Reopening of Sabino Canyon Recreational Area on September 21, 2020. Fifteen Partner members, five each from:

Friends of Sabino Canyon
Sabino Canyon Volunteer Nationalists
Santa Catalina Volunteer Patrol

In addition to the following video, images of the Drive-thru are in this Flickr Album.

David Lindo, The Urban Birder   Leave a comment

David LindoDavid Lindo (London, England), The Urban Birder at the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center — Image by kenne

As a blogger, I follow a lot of bloggers, mostly those into music, poetry,
and nature photography. One of my favorite blogs is Michael Stevenson’s “The Hobbledehoy.”  

Yesterday (08/09/20), Michael reblogged “A month in the life of The Urban Birder, David Lindo.
” Right away, I thought, “I know who David Lindo is.” Why do I know him?
In February of 2013, David presented to the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
in Tucson, Arizona.

I videoed the presentation, which was about 45 minutes. The idea was to make
it available in the SCVN library or on our website.
Well, without going into the details, it didn’t happen.

So, after Michael posted the article from Country Living,
I decided to reduce the length of his presentation and put it on YouTube.

This happening here in Tucson took place long before the Karens of the world were making news in Central Park.

— kenne

A Beautiful Morning In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

Bear Canyon Trail-72.jpgBear Canyon Trail In Sabino Canyon Recreational Area — Image by kenne

We spent this morning teaching 2nd-grade students how the Hohokam peoples of southern Arizona lived hundreds of years ago. The Hohokam left much evidence of their presence in Sabino Canyon, which was not only their home but also the source of food, clothing, and shelter materials. Over the years, the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have developed activities, Back to the Past (BTTP), geared toward explaining the Hohokam and how they existed in the Sonoran Desert.

Today was such a beautiful fall day in Sabino Canyon, I had to share at least one image taken on our walk back to the Visitor Center.

— kenne

Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing of pastel colored cliffs
      Where, under sapphire skies,
      The raincloud gently drifts.
      Of wondrous sunlit valleys wide,
      Timeless home of your clan — your tribe.
Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing a prayer that in future days
      You would ever honor your ancient ways,
      And that the Gods of health and peace
      In their boundless blessings, never cease,
      To be generous to these children here below,
      These children of the Desert.

— C. J. Colby, “Song to the Indian,” Arizona Highways, August 1973

 

 

Jim Martin, In Loving Memory Of A Great Naturalist   1 comment

Jim and B.J. Martin-Edit-1-72.jpgJim and B.J. Martin, May 7, 2018 , were honored by achieving Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) Emeritus Status.
— Image by kenne

I went to another funeral today, something I began doing at an early age while living with my grandparents. Old people’s friends die. Back then I didn’t always know the people and spent my time running around the graveyard across the road from the church with other children, in a small northeast Alabama rural town.

It’s different today being one of the old people whose friends are dying. When I became an SCVN member in 2011, Jim Martin had been an active member for 23 years, teaching elementary school children about nature and conservation, leading and participating in SCVN  hikes, and serving a treasurer, VP, and President of SCVN. I first met Jim on one of the SCVN Friday Hikes. He was an 82-year-old active hiker, a quiet, pleasant guy to be around — always smiling! 

Jim pasted away at the age of 90, July 16, 2019.

— kenne

 

 

National Public Lands Day — Before and After   2 comments

invasive-plants-1-of-1-pappas-grass-before-blogBefore Image by kenne

This is a before snapshot of soft feather pappus grass in and area where Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)would be removing invasive plants. Our focus would be to clear this area where we teach elementary children about nature, October through April.

pappus-grass-after-blogAfter Image by kenne

This after image illustrates how effective invasive plants are at crowding out native plants.

diamondback-blogRattlesnake Image by kenne

Removing invasive plants requires a lot of caution, keeping an eye out for rattlesnakes. There is a western diamondback rattlesnake in this image, which is a good example of how well the blend into grass. The snake is coiled center-right in this image.

Sabino Canyon Panorama — Bluff Trail   Leave a comment

Blacketts 11-04-11Bluff Trail, Sabino Canyon Panorama (November 3, 2011) — Image by kenne

The Bluff trail is a short (.2 mile) easy hike from the Sabino Canyon creekside above the dam to the Canyon tram road. The trail winds down along the ridge west of lower canyon riparian area, a result of the stream running through the canyon.

“The stream is the mountain’s gift to the desert, but the mountain is a fickle gift-giver,” David Wentworth Lazaroff writes in his book, Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis. Calling the Sabino Creek a fickle gift-giver is a perfect metaphor for describing the flow variations from a daily surface flow to dry, created by an unpredictable desert climate. Still, the diversity of plant and animal live along the canyon stream is perfect for Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to provide educational experiences for children and adults.

More often than not, when I’m in the canyon area, I have a camera. Over the last five years, I have produced many canyon panoramas. The above image was one of my early ones, created in Photoshop by merging three images, which is sometimes tricky since I’m usually not carrying a tripod to make alinement much easier.

— kenne

“For many Tucsonans the canyon is an old friend. Weare on a first-name basis. On a sunny weekend morning we say, simply, ‘Let’s go to Sabino.'”

— David Wentworth Lazaroff

 

View from Sunset Rock On Mt. Lemmon   1 comment

View from Sunset Rock (1 of 1) blogSouth View from Sunset Rock off of Sunset Trail on Mt. Lemmon in the Santa Catalina Mountains (August 12, 2016)
— Images by kenne

Hikers (1 of 1) blogStanding on Sunset Rock, Paul Kriegshauser, who has a cabin in the Mt. Lemmon community of Summerhaven,
shares some of his knowledge of Mt. Lemmon with Tom Skinner, Ricki Mensching (partially blocked by Tom),
Alice Bird and Phil Bentley.

Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.

— Frank Lloyd Wright

 

Hiking The Aspen and Marshall Gulch Loop On Mt. Lemmon Photo Essay   1 comment

(Click on any of the images to see larger view in a slideshow format.)

Hiking The Aspen and Marshall Gulch Loop (SCVN Friday Hike, July 15, 2016) — Images of hikers and guests by kenne

 

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