Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists’ Tag

A Beautiful Morning In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

Bear Canyon Trail-72.jpgBear Canyon Trail In Sabino Canyon Recreational Area — Image by kenne

We spent this morning teaching 2nd-grade students how the Hohokam peoples of southern Arizona lived hundreds of years ago. The Hohokam left much evidence of their presence in Sabino Canyon, which was not only their home but also the source of food, clothing, and shelter materials. Over the years, the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have developed activities, Back to the Past (BTTP), geared toward explaining the Hohokam and how they existed in the Sonoran Desert.

Today was such a beautiful fall day in Sabino Canyon, I had to share at least one image taken on our walk back to the Visitor Center.

— kenne

Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing of pastel colored cliffs
      Where, under sapphire skies,
      The raincloud gently drifts.
      Of wondrous sunlit valleys wide,
      Timeless home of your clan — your tribe.
Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing a prayer that in future days
      You would ever honor your ancient ways,
      And that the Gods of health and peace
      In their boundless blessings, never cease,
      To be generous to these children here below,
      These children of the Desert.

— C. J. Colby, “Song to the Indian,” Arizona Highways, August 1973

 

 

Jim Martin, In Loving Memory Of A Great Naturalist   1 comment

Jim and B.J. Martin-Edit-1-72.jpgJim and B.J. Martin, May 7, 2018 , were honored by achieving Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) Emeritus Status.
— Image by kenne

I went to another funeral today, something I began doing at an early age while living with my grandparents. Old people’s friends die. Back then I didn’t always know the people and spent my time running around the graveyard across the road from the church with other children, in a small northeast Alabama rural town.

It’s different today being one of the old people whose friends are dying. When I became an SCVN member in 2011, Jim Martin had been an active member for 23 years, teaching elementary school children about nature and conservation, leading and participating in SCVN  hikes, and serving a treasurer, VP, and President of SCVN. I first met Jim on one of the SCVN Friday Hikes. He was an 82-year-old active hiker, a quiet, pleasant guy to be around — always smiling! 

Jim pasted away at the age of 90, July 16, 2019.

— kenne

 

 

National Public Lands Day — Before and After   2 comments

invasive-plants-1-of-1-pappas-grass-before-blogBefore Image by kenne

This is a before snapshot of soft feather pappus grass in and area where Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)would be removing invasive plants. Our focus would be to clear this area where we teach elementary children about nature, October through April.

pappus-grass-after-blogAfter Image by kenne

This after image illustrates how effective invasive plants are at crowding out native plants.

diamondback-blogRattlesnake Image by kenne

Removing invasive plants requires a lot of caution, keeping an eye out for rattlesnakes. There is a western diamondback rattlesnake in this image, which is a good example of how well the blend into grass. The snake is coiled center-right in this image.

Sabino Canyon Panorama — Bluff Trail   Leave a comment

Blacketts 11-04-11Bluff Trail, Sabino Canyon Panorama (November 3, 2011) — Image by kenne

The Bluff trail is a short (.2 mile) easy hike from the Sabino Canyon creekside above the dam to the Canyon tram road. The trail winds down along the ridge west of lower canyon riparian area, a result of the stream running through the canyon.

“The stream is the mountain’s gift to the desert, but the mountain is a fickle gift-giver,” David Wentworth Lazaroff writes in his book, Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis. Calling the Sabino Creek a fickle gift-giver is a perfect metaphor for describing the flow variations from a daily surface flow to dry, created by an unpredictable desert climate. Still, the diversity of plant and animal live along the canyon stream is perfect for Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to provide educational experiences for children and adults.

More often than not, when I’m in the canyon area, I have a camera. Over the last five years, I have produced many canyon panoramas. The above image was one of my early ones, created in Photoshop by merging three images, which is sometimes tricky since I’m usually not carrying a tripod to make alinement much easier.

— kenne

“For many Tucsonans the canyon is an old friend. Weare on a first-name basis. On a sunny weekend morning we say, simply, ‘Let’s go to Sabino.'”

— David Wentworth Lazaroff

 

View from Sunset Rock On Mt. Lemmon   1 comment

View from Sunset Rock (1 of 1) blogSouth View from Sunset Rock off of Sunset Trail on Mt. Lemmon in the Santa Catalina Mountains (August 12, 2016)
— Images by kenne

Hikers (1 of 1) blogStanding on Sunset Rock, Paul Kriegshauser, who has a cabin in the Mt. Lemmon community of Summerhaven,
shares some of his knowledge of Mt. Lemmon with Tom Skinner, Ricki Mensching (partially blocked by Tom),
Alice Bird and Phil Bentley.

Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.

— Frank Lloyd Wright

 

Hiking The Aspen and Marshall Gulch Loop On Mt. Lemmon Photo Essay   1 comment

(Click on any of the images to see larger view in a slideshow format.)

Hiking The Aspen and Marshall Gulch Loop (SCVN Friday Hike, July 15, 2016) — Images of hikers and guests by kenne

 

Friday Hike Rained Out, A Photo Essay   10 comments

Friday morning, July 1st, a little before 8:00am we stood in the McDonald’s parking lot
looking up at the dark clouds over the Santa Catalina mountains.
This is our regular meeting place before driving the 25 miles up to
Mt. Lemmon for the SCVN (Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists) summer guided hikes.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1) blog

Only, this Friday morning there were just the three guides, Maribeth, Maureen and myself.
Others who may have been planning to hike on Mt. Lemmon, probably
took one look out the window deciding it was not a good day for hiking.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-2 blog

This Friday’s scheduled hike was to be a six mile hike starting at the Ski Valley parking lot,
hiking a loop of Aspen Drew, Lemmon and Meadow trails starting at 9:00am.

After a brief discussion, we decided to cancel the hike. However,
since all the SCVN summer hikes are posted in the Arizona Daily Star,
as the lead guide, I would need to drive to Ski Valley letting those who may
still be planning on hiking know that the hike had been cancelled.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-3 blog

As somewhat expected, the weather conditions got worse as I drove up Catalina Highway.
The conditions kept changing rapidly from mist, thick fog, to rain.

When I arrived at the Ski Valley parking lot, there were five vehicles
with about twelve people preparing to hike. At closer look,
I didn’t recognize anyone,
so I ask if they were there to do the SCVN led hike —
no, they were members of the Southern Arizona Hiking Club.
The conversation ended quickly as we were beginning to experience a heavy downpour.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-4 blog

The rain lasted long enough for the hiking club members to call off their hike.
It didn’t help that the temperature was 55 wet degrees.

Ironically, the Southern Arizona Hiking Club had been planning on doing
the same combination of trails as SCVN had scheduled.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-5 blog

Now that my task was completed, I started my drive back, stopping at the Summerhaven public restrooms.

I was hoping to get a cup of coffee in Summerhaven, but that would have to wait till getting back down the mountain.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-7 blog

In the summertime, the monsoon weather can change quickly, bringing plenty of lightening, wind, hail and rain.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-9 blog

For the return drive, the fog had lifted and the thick clouds had begun to breakup.
Since I had plenty of time, what better used of it than to stop now and then takeing photos.

Rain In The Mountains (1 of 1)-10 blog

In the distance beyond the last ridge is the Tucson basin. Arriving home after 10:30am, I could see very dark clouds moving into the Tucson area. By mid-day we had received 1.8 inches of rain. What a great way to begin July and the monsoon season in the desert.

— kenne

 

Standing With Giants   4 comments

Standing with Gaints-2 blogKenne Turner, David W. Lazaroff, Steve Plevel, and Bob Barnacastle

Yesterday I was honored to be MC at the graduation event for sixteen new naturalists, which included recognizing the founders of the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN), David W. Lazaroff, Steve Plevel and Bob Barnacastle. In 1977 these guys began formulating what became SCVN. It was a pleasure to stand along side of such giants in our organization.Their continuing support is a reflection of the quality of SCVN.

Big THANKS to all who made yesterday’s event a great success.

kenne

 

Last Day Of Class   Leave a comment

SCVN Wrap-Up (1 of 1)-9 blogNew SCVN Naturalists and Their Mentors Wrap-up Training(January 11, 2016)  — Image by kenne

The temperature was near thirty-two degrees at the Cactus Picnic Area in Sabino Canyon where the final day of training was scheduled. After spending time demonstrating some of their new skills, the new naturalists were treated to a surprise party at Rattlesnake Canyon Picnic Area near Sabino creek.

Graduation will take place this coming Saturday (January 16, 2016).

kenne

 

Hiking Green Mountain Trail To Guthrie Peak   2 comments

A fun hike with beautiful views north and south of the Santa Catalina Mountains can be experienced by hiking the Green Mountain trail out of the General Hitchcock campgrounds to the Guthrie Peak trail. The hike was the last scheduled hike for the SCVN Friday hikes at the cooler temperatures in the mountains before beginning our winter hikes in Sabino Canyon next week.

The morning forecast was for rain in the mountains, spreading to the lower elevations by late afternoon. This might explain why Tim and I had only one hiker (Deborah) with us, the least number in our experience guiding the SCVN hikes. Reasons for such a low number are sheer speculation at this date, however we will continue to evaluate the service SCVN is providing through our scheduled Friday public hikes.

Regardless, the weather was great and as you can see from the photos in this posting, we had another excellent hiking experience. This was Deborah’s first Guthrie Peak hike and what better way than with Tim and I giving her all our guide attention.

kenne

Guthrie Peak Panorama (1 of 1) blogPanorama View from Guthrie Peak of Storm Clouds Moving Into The Tucson Area — Image by kenne
(Click on any of the images below for a larger view in a slideshow format.)

Images by kenneGuthrie Peak Panorama (1 of 1)-7 art blogGuthrie Peak Computer Art by kenne

Fall Classes Begin In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

October through April of each year for over thirty years, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have offered K-6 classes science and social history programs in the canyon. Each program involves an hour of interactive content at a picnic table and an hour nature walk, each fitting into the teacher’s curriculum at the time of the field trip.

— kenne

Thursday SCVN Elementary (1 of 1)-7 blogNaturalist Phil teaching second grade students using the “Web of Life” elementary school instruction kit.

Thursday SCVN Elementary (1 of 1)-6 blog Naturalists Jeff and Alexa guiding students across one of the low-water crossing bridges in Sabino Canyon.

Thursday SCVN Elementary (1 of 1)-4 blog Naturalist Fran teaching a group of boys on a nature walk.

Thursday SCVN Elementary (1 of 1)-3 blog Naturalist Becky showing where a twig girdler beetle has cut into a Mesquite limb.

Thursday SCVN Elementary (1 of 1)-2 blogBecky explains why the twig girdler has cut the Mesquite limb. — Images by kenne

SCVN Training — Day 1   3 comments

SCVN Day 1

Sabino Canyon Tour Led By David Wentworth Lazaroff (September, 2011) — Image by kenne

Yesterday was day one of training for the 20115/16 Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) class. It was just four years ago that I was part of the 2011 class. This year, as then the first day included a tram tour of the canyon by David Lazaroff, naturalist, author and founder of SCVN.

Like a kid, the first day of class was very exciting, getting to know fellow classmates, our naturalists leaders and meeting David Lazaroff. His book, Sabino Canyon — The Life of a Southwestern Oasis, is a must read for all naturalists in southern Arizona. 

Yesterday’s first day for the new class brought back many memories as I was there to greet the new class members. This morning, before writing this post, I viewed again a video I made in 2011 of Lazaroff’s tour of Sabino Canyon. As per his request, the video is available only for SCVN members.

I love going to Sabino Canyon!

I love going to Sabino Canyon,
a place to come together with nature.

I love the people there,
sharing feelings with nature.

I love being able to see
the beauty of nature.

I love going to Sabino Canyon!

I love being able to reflect
on the art of nature.

I love close-up encounters
with all things in nature.

I love capturing the moment,
drawing inspiration from nature.

I love going to Sabino Canyon!

I love learning new ways
to connect with nature.

I love getting to know me
by connecting with nature.

I love finding surprising things
by getting to know nature.

I love going to Sabino Canyon!

I love the feelings of being alive
by walking with nature.

I love knowing that
forever is the life of nature.

I love knowing that
all that is, is nature.

I love going to Sabino Canyon!

— kenne

This video was first posted on this blog March of 2010, a few months before we moved from The Woodlands, Texas
to Tucson, and a year and a half before beginning training to become a naturalist.
Viewing this video now reminds me how little I knew about the Sonoran Desert,
still it’s a reflection of my love for this southwestern oasis.

To the new SCVN class: If you like Sabino Canyon now, you will learn to love it!

 

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