Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists’ Category

Nature Is Always Open!   3 comments

Kinder 4-19-16-0972 Naturalist Phil Bentley-2-72SCVN President, Phil Bentley Teaching a Kindergarten Class In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

As Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN), we are not currently offering nature education programs to school children and the public because of the coronavirus. However, individually we are in the canyon, encouraging everyone to spend time outdoors.

This morning naturalist Nancy Wilkenson, who teaches in our kindergarten program, did this short virtual nature walk encouraging people to come out to the canyon. Nature is always open!

— kenne

No Classes In Sabino Canyon   5 comments

Kids at Sabino Dam-72Overlooking the Sabino Dam — Image by kenne

Sabino Canyon Recreation Area is a great place for children to be, but in this age of
coronavirus schools are closed meaning no field trips. Children and adult programs
offered by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists are now canceled untiled next October.
Like all communities around the globe, we are dealing with a new normal.

— kenne 

The Naturalist   Leave a comment

Elementary Program-15-Maureen-72-Edit-1“The Naturalist” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

Learning About Nature   Leave a comment

Elementary Program-5-Art-3-72“Learning About Nature” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists teaching children about nature in Sabino Canyon.

 

Panning For Garnets   Leave a comment

Thursday Elementary January 24, 2019-11-Infrared-72Students Panning For Garnets In Sabino Creek — Infrared Image by kenne

One of the programs taught by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to elementary
school children is geology called “Strike It Rich.” They learn how the Santa Catalina
Mountains were formed and the minerals contained in the “gneiss” rock.
The primary
activity is panning for garnets (sand rubies) in Sabino Creek.
The students uncovered the link between the towering granite cliffs
above the Tucson Basin and all that lies below.

— kenne

Mallard Duck At Hutch’s Pool   Leave a comment

Mallard Duck Hutch's Pool-Edit-2-72Mallard Duck At Hutch’s Pool In The Santa Catalina Mountains — Image by kenne

Hutch’s Pool is a small body of water that contains water year-round, located 8 miles for the Sabino Canyon  Visitor Center. Most people hiking to Hutch’s Pool will take the tram up to stop 9, thereby reducing the 16-mile roundtrip by 7.5 miles. The Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) usually schedule a group hike twice a year, once in the Fall and once in the Spring. The hike provides very nice views
of upper Sabino Canyon,
images of which I have shared many times on this blog. This time I decided to share a photo of this male mallard duck few years back.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Nature Program For Elementary School Students   Leave a comment

One of the subjects we teach is geology, how the Santa Catalina Mountains were
formed, and the importance of water in the formation of Sabino Canyon. Twelve
million years ago, the Santa Catalina Mountains were just a range of hills, but the
earth’s crust in western North America was being stretched. What resulted were
huge blocks with steep vaults forming an up-and-down landscape called the
Basin and Range Province. 

Kenne & 3rd Grade Students-72Naturalist, Kenne Turner with 3rd Grade Students (Sabino Canyon Dam Area)
— Images by Teacher

Sabino Canyon is composed of a hard metamorphic rock called “Catalina gneiss.”
Gneiss contains rock and five minerals; quartz, mica, feldspar, magnetite, and garnets.
Over time water and earthquakes have eroded the gneiss rock carrying smaller rocks
and minerals down streams like Sabino Creek. The minerals are deposited along the
creek edges, which created a natural laboratory to learn about the minerals by panning
for garnets. Need I say, kids love panning for garnets.    

Kenne&3rd Grade Students-72Students panning for garnets in Sabino Creek.

“For many Tucsonans, the canyon is an old friend. We are on a first-name basis.
On a sunny weekend morning, we say, simply, “Let’s go to Sabino.

— from Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis by David Wentworth Lazaroff

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