Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists’ Category

Sunrise At Sabino Dam   Leave a comment

Sabino Dam-1737-Pano-72Sunrise at Sabino Canyon Recreation Area Dam — Image by kenne

Typically this time of year, there is no water coming over the dam
till the monsoon rains later this month through August. — kenne

*****

The river- was, but died away,
leaving behind sand and stone,
a dry river bed.

The river that once led the way,
To Rameses throne,
Has no more life- dead.

The river from which reeds grew and swayed,
now dead and gone,
all that’s left-a dry river bed.

The river that was marvelous by day,
and treacherous once the sun was gone,
is now but a dri river bed.

The river- beautiful, no words could say,
left behind – just a dry river bed.

— Esnala Banda

Naturalist, Ed Rawl — Kind Words For A Very Special Man   2 comments

Butterfly TrailEd Rawl Over Looking the San Pedro Valley — Image by kenne

IN REMEMBERANCE

Edgar (Ed) Rawl passed away on April 18, 2020, after suffering a stroke. A celebration of life memorial service for Ed is planned for Saturday, May 9, 2020 (a simple ceremony in the desert was his expressed desire). We will meet in the overflow parking lot of Sabino Canyon at 6:00 am to beat the heat and walk a short distance from there. Ed’s friends are invited, and you may share your memories of him if you wish to do so. We will try to maintain social distancing and encourage everyone to wear a mask or other face covering.

“He was a soft-spoken, kind man who was always positive despite chronic health problems. He was good with the kids and a great colleague. He will be missed very much.” — Jan Labiner

. . . a beautiful remembrance and tribute to our good friend.” —  Phil Bentley

“Ed was a special person. I always think of him when I discuss with children why they should not get closer to the edge of a cliff (such as the dam overlook) than they are tall. Ed taught me that. His vast experience as a Park Ranger gave him the knowledge that never ceased to amaze me. RIP, my friend.” — Bill Kaufman

“Oh, I am so very sad…what a loss…he was such a special..pleasant person.” — Becky Duncan 

“Ed deserves this kind of tribute. Thank you!” — Dan Granger

“I remember so vividly our good friend Ed, our wonderful naturalist and hiker. It made me so sad to see our beautiful hike together….. and also glad ….. when I look at these mountains, I think Ed will be there somewhere!” — Alexa Von Bieberstein

“. . . a kind and gentle soul. Miss him greatly.” — Debbie and Jerry Bird

“. . . this special man who has been a treasure both for SCVN and all the people for whom he shared his love.  I remember with special fondness the day Ed led us on our hike to Thimble Peak.  I think of him and the rest of our small band every time I glimpse the peak.” — Tim Ralph

Ed was an incredible, kind, calm, and positive person. I knew the kids were lucky when they had him for their trip. I will miss him and remember him. Coming into the canyon will always invoke his memory to me, and his spirit will exist there for me.”Roberto Veranes

“He was a wonderful man.” — Linda Procter

“He was such a gentleman with a wonderful sense of humor.  He rarely spoke of his medical challenges, which were progressive.  Such an honorable man.  He will be missed.” — Nancy Murphy

“Ed has a style with children that was gentle, but firm. His ability to balance these two paradoxical qualities is what made him an exceptional man to be around. He had health issues for some time, but for the longest time, he fought them off, so to keep hiking. He was a fighter. ‘Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.'” — Kenne Turner

“It is still difficult for me to process this, and I suspect friends and many Nats must be dealing with a terrible sense of loss and sadness. Ed was a second mentor to me when I began in Elementary Program on Thursdays. I still use his “Lizzie” device with the NYSI kit…haven’t found anything better. He was knowledgeable, patient, possessed a wonderful dry wit, and thought deeply about many things, such as international affairs, and the role of the US in them.  His depth and breadth was astounding. He could be counted on to be there every week, and seldom made any mention of his health issues because, I think, he didn’t feel comfortable putting himself first.

It will be difficult to face a world without Ed in it.” — Jeff Hahn
An Album of Photos by kenne
Ed Rawl-Butterfly Trail 15 - 2012-06-01

For His Love Of Nature — Ed Rawl, R.I.P.   7 comments

Ed Rawl-Oct 2013-8278-Whitman-72

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN), Ed Rawl, died April 18, 2020. Ed loved everything about being out in nature and teaching his love of nature to children. He completed the SCVN training program in 2010, one year before I did. During my, training Ed was one of the naturalists I spent time observing. He was a factor in my choosing to teach on Thursdays in the elementary program.

SCVN Thursdays-Ed Rawl-03-03-16.-72Ed Rawl; Thursday Elementary School Program (3/3/16)

Ed taught on Thursdays from January 2010 to January 2019. He loved being with the kids and remained active in the program until a series of health issues began to take a toll on him.

Ed Rawl-72Ed Rawl (January 10, 2019)

Ed was the Thursday Day Coordinator in December 2014 when Alexa Von Bieberstein, who had been an SCVN member since 2007, was returning to Germany.

 

When I was Vice President of Public Interpretation, I called on Ed several times to help guide groups of hikers.

ASHA Group (1 of 1)-72Dan Granger and Ed Rawl with Members of the American Senior Housing Association (11/07/14)

Ed-Appalachian Mountain Club-72Ed Rawl Guiding Some of the Appalachian Mountains Club Members to Hutch’s Pool (04/08/14)

Marshall Gulch #3SCVN Friday Hikes with Ann Nierenberg, Ed Rawl, Dan Granger and Tim Ralph (6/22/12)

Ed loved hiking in the Santa Catalina Mountains and was an active guide in the SCVN Friday Hikes.

Ed & JanOct 2013-8237-72Ed Rawl and Naturalist Jan Labiner Hiking to Seven Falls (10/17/2013) 

When not doing the regular SCVN Friday hikes, he would hike with friends, or often alone.

Thimble Peak-8672-2-Tim, Ed, Phil, ALexa-72Hiking to Thimble Peak — Naturalists Tim Ralph, Ed Rawl, Phil Bentley, and Alexa Von Bieberstein at the Gorden Hirabayashi Campground (11/07/13)

One of the most memorable experiences came in November of 2013 when Tim Ralph, Ed Rawl, Alexa Von Bieberstein, Phil Bentley, and myself hiked to Thimble Peak. On a windy and chilly morning, we began our hike out of the Gorden Hirabayashi Campground

Thimble Peak-8684-2-Tim, Ed, Alaxa & Phil-72 Tim Ralph, Ed Rawl, Alexa Von Bieberstein, and Phil Bentley (11/07/13)

 

 

 

 

Nature Is Always Open!   3 comments

Kinder 4-19-16-0972 Naturalist Phil Bentley-2-72SCVN President, Phil Bentley Teaching a Kindergarten Class In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

As Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN), we are not currently offering nature education programs to school children and the public because of the coronavirus. However, individually we are in the canyon, encouraging everyone to spend time outdoors.

This morning naturalist Nancy Wilkenson, who teaches in our kindergarten program, did this short virtual nature walk encouraging people to come out to the canyon. Nature is always open!

— kenne

No Classes In Sabino Canyon   5 comments

Kids at Sabino Dam-72Overlooking the Sabino Dam — Image by kenne

Sabino Canyon Recreation Area is a great place for children to be, but in this age of
coronavirus schools are closed meaning no field trips. Children and adult programs
offered by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists are now canceled untiled next October.
Like all communities around the globe, we are dealing with a new normal.

— kenne 

The Naturalist   Leave a comment

Elementary Program-15-Maureen-72-Edit-1“The Naturalist” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

Learning About Nature   Leave a comment

Elementary Program-5-Art-3-72“Learning About Nature” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists teaching children about nature in Sabino Canyon.

 

Panning For Garnets   Leave a comment

Thursday Elementary January 24, 2019-11-Infrared-72Students Panning For Garnets In Sabino Creek — Infrared Image by kenne

One of the programs taught by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to elementary
school children is geology called “Strike It Rich.” They learn how the Santa Catalina
Mountains were formed and the minerals contained in the “gneiss” rock.
The primary
activity is panning for garnets (sand rubies) in Sabino Creek.
The students uncovered the link between the towering granite cliffs
above the Tucson Basin and all that lies below.

— kenne

Mallard Duck At Hutch’s Pool   Leave a comment

Mallard Duck Hutch's Pool-Edit-2-72Mallard Duck At Hutch’s Pool In The Santa Catalina Mountains — Image by kenne

Hutch’s Pool is a small body of water that contains water year-round, located 8 miles for the Sabino Canyon  Visitor Center. Most people hiking to Hutch’s Pool will take the tram up to stop 9, thereby reducing the 16-mile roundtrip by 7.5 miles. The Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) usually schedule a group hike twice a year, once in the Fall and once in the Spring. The hike provides very nice views
of upper Sabino Canyon,
images of which I have shared many times on this blog. This time I decided to share a photo of this male mallard duck few years back.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Nature Program For Elementary School Students   Leave a comment

One of the subjects we teach is geology, how the Santa Catalina Mountains were
formed, and the importance of water in the formation of Sabino Canyon. Twelve
million years ago, the Santa Catalina Mountains were just a range of hills, but the
earth’s crust in western North America was being stretched. What resulted were
huge blocks with steep vaults forming an up-and-down landscape called the
Basin and Range Province. 

Kenne & 3rd Grade Students-72Naturalist, Kenne Turner with 3rd Grade Students (Sabino Canyon Dam Area)
— Images by Teacher

Sabino Canyon is composed of a hard metamorphic rock called “Catalina gneiss.”
Gneiss contains rock and five minerals; quartz, mica, feldspar, magnetite, and garnets.
Over time water and earthquakes have eroded the gneiss rock carrying smaller rocks
and minerals down streams like Sabino Creek. The minerals are deposited along the
creek edges, which created a natural laboratory to learn about the minerals by panning
for garnets. Need I say, kids love panning for garnets.    

Kenne&3rd Grade Students-72Students panning for garnets in Sabino Creek.

“For many Tucsonans, the canyon is an old friend. We are on a first-name basis.
On a sunny weekend morning, we say, simply, “Let’s go to Sabino.

— from Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis by David Wentworth Lazaroff

2020, The Year Of The Nurse And Midwife   1 comment

Bluff Trail (1 of 1)-5-Nurse Tree-72A “Nurse Tree” In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

2020 is the Year of the Nurse and Midwife by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Health Assembly (WHA) as the year to honor nurses and midwives to mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale who is considered the founder of modern nursing. Nurses and midwives are vital to providing health services to our communities. These people are devoting their lives to caring for mothers and children, giving lifesaving immunizations and health advice, looking after older people, and generally meeting everyday essential health needs. And they are often the first and only point of care, yet the world needs 9 million more nurses and midwives if it is to achieve universal health coverage by 2030.

The vital role of the nurse becomes a metaphor for those of us (Sabino Canyon Volunteer Nationalists) involved in teaching elementary school children about the importance and survival of saguaros in Sabino Canyon and the Sonoran Desert.

Debbie Leading Nature Walk-72-2SCVN member, Debbie Bird, telling third graders about the “Nurse Tree.”
(She also got the attention of an elderly couple visiting Sabino Canyon.)

Often, for young saguaros to survive, they are located near another faster-growing tree that shelters the slower-growing plant by providing shade, shelter from the wind and sun, or protection from animals that may feed on the young plant. Such a plant is called a nurse tree. A metaphor easily understood by the children in conveying the important relationship between the tree and the saguaro. They get it!

— kenne

See You On The Trail-72

“Even though they’re dead, they are not gone — trees find a way to help each other out postmortem.”

Allie WisniewskiAmerican Forests

 

Hiking Ventana Canyon — December 13, 2019   3 comments

Ventana Canyon-8-72Hiking Ventana Canyon — December 13, 2019 — Photo-Essay by Kenne

Ventana Canyon is one of several narrow canyons in the southern front range of the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, Arizona. This hike is usually scheduled each fall and spring by the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists, which involves crossing water over a dozen times.

— kenne

 

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