Archive for the ‘Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists’ Category

Hiking Turkey Run On Mt. Lemmon   3 comments

Turkey Run Gallery by kenne

I was originally scheduled to lead the SCVN Turkey Run Trail hike tomorrow. However, because of some nagging leg problems,
I had to bow out. Instead, I did hike Turkey Run with two friends (Tom and John) last Friday. Usually, by this time of year,
there are plenty of wildflowers, but not this year. The gallery contains cow parsnip, New Mexico Locust, and silverpuff.

— kenne

Aspen Loop One Year Out After The Big Horn Fire   5 comments

SCVN Friday hikes on Mt. Lemmon have

Begun with more excitement than usual,

Last year’s hikes being a casualty of the

Big Horn Fire and the pandemic.

Marshall Gulch #3

Marshall Gulch Parking Area

Leaving behind morning temperatures

In the mid-eights, we gathered at Marshall Gulch

To hike the Aspen Loop, combining the Aspen

And Marshall Gulch trails for a 4.3-mile hike.

 

Marshall Gulch survived the fire, as did

Most of the trail. But the Aspen Trail

Wasn’t so lucky with parts that burned

From the 1993 Aspen Fire burning again.

Aspen Trail (June 15, 2015)

Over the years, I watch aspens and pines

And many other native plants return

Among the charred remains of the Aspen Fire

Only now to experience that same fate.

Last year’s fires were followed by the driest year

On record, delaying the reclamation process

And trail clearing to provide for safe hiking

On the grayest powder covering the trails.

The mountain ferns were among the plants

To return only weeks after containing the fire,

Providing hope to those grieving over the lose

Of so much beauty found on these mountain trails.

Now so exposed, the trail seems longer

Each step requiring a watchful eye

For this out of shape hiker, navigating

The loose gravel and ankle turning rocks.

Just beyond the ridge, a line of trees

Was missed by the very erratic wildfire

As if it turned on a dime, redirecting

The firefighting crew from Montana.

Soon the trail turns away from the freshly

Scared land rambling among tall ponderosas

Shadows formed by the whole clear

Cloudless sky moving across the trail.

Images by kenne

I’ve hiked the trails on Mt. Lemmon

Now ten summers, where troubles cease,

untangled silent knowledge contemplating

A void in a world that exceeds stillness.

— kenne

Naturalists To Resume Mountain Hikes   Leave a comment

SCVN Friday Hikes In The Santa Catalina Mountains To Resume This Summer — Image from 2017

The last Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) hike was March 2020. The National Forest Service has authorized the SCVN to begin Friday Hikes this June on Mt. Lemmon. The Forest Service will require all volunteers to wear masks at all times while volunteering. The groups will be smaller and maintain social distancing.

— kenne

Missing The Kids In The Canyon   1 comment

Elementary School Class In Sabino Canyon (February, 2012) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Since March of 2020 Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have not bee working with students on field trips
in the Tucson area. We are hoping to start offering nature classes again this fall. Meanwhile, SCVN has developed
a series of videos called The Canyon Classroom covering some of the “Fun Facts” covering the history, geology,
ecology, and wildlife of Sabino Canyon.

(Original image provided by the teacher.)

— kenne

Kids Love Rocks   1 comment

Kids Love Rocks — Image by kenne

Touching each rock

with a magnet, she

learns which is magnetite.

— kenne

Two Visitors Waddle By   Leave a comment

Two Visitors Waddle By (04-15-15) — Image by kenne

A Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist is teaching kids as two mallard ducks waddle by.
Nothing like being outdoors in nature’s classroom.

Behold the duck.
It does not cluck.
A cluck it lacks.
It quacks.
It is specially fond
Of a puddle or pond.
When it dines or sups,
It bottoms ups.

 
— Ogden Nash

Sabino Canyon — Thank You   1 comment

‘Thank You’ Art from Children Who Went On Field Trips To Sabino Canyon Before The Pandemic

It has now been over a year since teachers have brought students to Sabino Canyon — they are dearly missed! We are hoping that by October, our normal five days a week schedule will return. 

Meanwhile, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists have been busy creating videos for the Sabino Canyon – The Canyon Classroom. Check it out and Subscribe.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Goes Virtual   Leave a comment

Teaching Elementary School Students Geology in Sabino Canyon (January 2019) 

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) stopped offering their Elementary School Nature program in March of 2020 because of the pandemic. Since teachers are no longer able to bring their students to the canyon, SCVN has begun creating a series of videos, Sabino Canyon, The Canyon Classroom, and placed them on YouTube.

Several videos have been created to date. The most recent one is Harvester Ants.

Naturalist Jeff Hahn with Elementary School Students — Images by kenne

A November Hike To Hutch’s Pool   2 comments

Fall Colors Along Sabino Creek Hiking to Hutch’s Pool — Panorama by kenne

One of my favorite hikes is to Hutch’s Pool. In the past, the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
would guide a fall and spring hike, each hike having a many as 15 hikers.
However, like so many things, not this fall because of the pandemic.
The trail is open, but not for groups.

— kenne

* * * * *

I bear many scars,

but I also carry with me moments

that would not have happened

if I had not dared 

to go beyond my limits.

— Paulo Coelho

Crossing Sabino Creek Below Hutch’s Pool — Image by kenne

 

Frank S. Rose, 09/11/27 – 10/15/20   2 comments

Mountain Wildflowers of Southern Arizona —
A Field Guide to the Santa Catalina Mountains and Other Nearby Ranges by Frank S. Rose

When I began hiking the mountains of southern Arizona, I always had my
camera with me. If you follower of this blog, you know there are many
photos of beautiful mountain wildflowers, most of which I could not identify.
However, Frank S. Rose made it easy for me to put names with the photos
with the publication of his field guide in 2011. 

For years before the guide’s publication, Frank spent summers painting
watercolor images of the wildflowers. But, much like myself, he experienced
difficulty identifying the wildflowers. It wasn’t until Frank got to know Joan Tedford,
Bob Porter and other Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists spending time
with them on their weekly nature walks, that he began to work on his
photographic field guide.

Thank you, Frank, for your many hours and miles of walking, searching,
photographing and learning about flowers from which so many of us have benefited.

— kenne

 

Joan Tedford, Debbie Bird, Edi Moore, Heather Murphy, and Frank Rose (May 2, 2016) — Images by kenne

In this video, Frank Rose tells the story of how he met Joan Tedford.

 

Hope   1 comment

Cedar Waxwing — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Hope is the thing with feathers—
that perches in the soul—
and sings the tune without the words—
and never stops—at all—

— Emily Dickinson

Sabino Canyon To Reopen With Partial Services   3 comments

CJ Woodard, Santa Catalina District Ranger

On Friday, September 18, 2020, District Ranger conducted a guided tour for Partner members ahead of the Scheduled Reopening of Sabino Canyon Recreational Area on September 21, 2020. Fifteen Partner members, five each from:

Friends of Sabino Canyon
Sabino Canyon Volunteer Nationalists
Santa Catalina Volunteer Patrol

In addition to the following video, images of the Drive-thru are in this Flickr Album.

David Lindo, The Urban Birder   Leave a comment

David LindoDavid Lindo (London, England), The Urban Birder at the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center — Image by kenne

As a blogger, I follow a lot of bloggers, mostly those into music, poetry,
and nature photography. One of my favorite blogs is Michael Stevenson’s “The Hobbledehoy.”  

Yesterday (08/09/20), Michael reblogged “A month in the life of The Urban Birder, David Lindo.
” Right away, I thought, “I know who David Lindo is.” Why do I know him?
In February of 2013, David presented to the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN)
in Tucson, Arizona.

I videoed the presentation, which was about 45 minutes. The idea was to make
it available in the SCVN library or on our website.
Well, without going into the details, it didn’t happen.

So, after Michael posted the article from Country Living,
I decided to reduce the length of his presentation and put it on YouTube.

This happening here in Tucson took place long before the Karens of the world were making news in Central Park.

— kenne

Sunrise At Sabino Dam   Leave a comment

Sabino Dam-1737-Pano-72Sunrise at Sabino Canyon Recreation Area Dam — Image by kenne

Typically this time of year, there is no water coming over the dam
till the monsoon rains later this month through August. — kenne

*****

The river- was, but died away,
leaving behind sand and stone,
a dry river bed.

The river that once led the way,
To Rameses throne,
Has no more life- dead.

The river from which reeds grew and swayed,
now dead and gone,
all that’s left-a dry river bed.

The river that was marvelous by day,
and treacherous once the sun was gone,
is now but a dri river bed.

The river- beautiful, no words could say,
left behind – just a dry river bed.

— Esnala Banda

Naturalist, Ed Rawl — Kind Words For A Very Special Man   2 comments

Butterfly TrailEd Rawl Over Looking the San Pedro Valley — Image by kenne

IN REMEMBERANCE

Edgar (Ed) Rawl passed away on April 18, 2020, after suffering a stroke. A celebration of life memorial service for Ed is planned for Saturday, May 9, 2020 (a simple ceremony in the desert was his expressed desire). We will meet in the overflow parking lot of Sabino Canyon at 6:00 am to beat the heat and walk a short distance from there. Ed’s friends are invited, and you may share your memories of him if you wish to do so. We will try to maintain social distancing and encourage everyone to wear a mask or other face covering.

“He was a soft-spoken, kind man who was always positive despite chronic health problems. He was good with the kids and a great colleague. He will be missed very much.” — Jan Labiner

. . . a beautiful remembrance and tribute to our good friend.” —  Phil Bentley

“Ed was a special person. I always think of him when I discuss with children why they should not get closer to the edge of a cliff (such as the dam overlook) than they are tall. Ed taught me that. His vast experience as a Park Ranger gave him the knowledge that never ceased to amaze me. RIP, my friend.” — Bill Kaufman

“Oh, I am so very sad…what a loss…he was such a special..pleasant person.” — Becky Duncan 

“Ed deserves this kind of tribute. Thank you!” — Dan Granger

“I remember so vividly our good friend Ed, our wonderful naturalist and hiker. It made me so sad to see our beautiful hike together….. and also glad ….. when I look at these mountains, I think Ed will be there somewhere!” — Alexa Von Bieberstein

“. . . a kind and gentle soul. Miss him greatly.” — Debbie and Jerry Bird

“. . . this special man who has been a treasure both for SCVN and all the people for whom he shared his love.  I remember with special fondness the day Ed led us on our hike to Thimble Peak.  I think of him and the rest of our small band every time I glimpse the peak.” — Tim Ralph

Ed was an incredible, kind, calm, and positive person. I knew the kids were lucky when they had him for their trip. I will miss him and remember him. Coming into the canyon will always invoke his memory to me, and his spirit will exist there for me.”Roberto Veranes

“He was a wonderful man.” — Linda Procter

“He was such a gentleman with a wonderful sense of humor.  He rarely spoke of his medical challenges, which were progressive.  Such an honorable man.  He will be missed.” — Nancy Murphy

“Ed has a style with children that was gentle, but firm. His ability to balance these two paradoxical qualities is what made him an exceptional man to be around. He had health issues for some time, but for the longest time, he fought them off, so to keep hiking. He was a fighter. ‘Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.'” — Kenne Turner

“It is still difficult for me to process this, and I suspect friends and many Nats must be dealing with a terrible sense of loss and sadness. Ed was a second mentor to me when I began in Elementary Program on Thursdays. I still use his “Lizzie” device with the NYSI kit…haven’t found anything better. He was knowledgeable, patient, possessed a wonderful dry wit, and thought deeply about many things, such as international affairs, and the role of the US in them.  His depth and breadth was astounding. He could be counted on to be there every week, and seldom made any mention of his health issues because, I think, he didn’t feel comfortable putting himself first.

It will be difficult to face a world without Ed in it.” — Jeff Hahn
An Album of Photos by kenne
Ed Rawl-Butterfly Trail 15 - 2012-06-01
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