Archive for the ‘Coronado National Forest’ Category

Tree On The Ridge   2 comments

Tree On The Ridge — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Tree Tops

In the yellow sunset
a blue haze glows
on the ridgetop
shadows binding
through juniper trees.
Hikers turning back — 
Know what I mean?

— kenne 

A Recent Drive Up The Catalina Highway To Ski Valley   3 comments

Yesterday (08/05/20), I drove up the Catalina Highway to Mt. Lemmon. The highway was opened to the general public last Saturday morning for the first time since the Bighorn Fire began in early June. The mountain town of Summerheaven, successfully protected from the fire, is now open for business, although still having to follow HOVID-19 business regulations in Arizona.

Oricle Ridge-72Oracle Ridge and Mt. Lemmon Fire Station

Before entering Summerheaven, there are two ridges going north; Red Ridge and Oracle Ridge. Both ridges were severely burned during the 2003 Aspen Fire that destroyed almost all the homes in Summerheaven. Over the years since the Aspen Fire, the forest canopy has still not returned on these ridges. However, a lot of ground cover containing some bushes and small trees had returned. On June 17th, the two ridges were again burned. On June 19th, I posted two time-delay videos of the fire coming through the area pictured in the above photo. The fire station and most of the pines behind it were spared — not true of the storage building and new growth since the 2003 fire. It has now been 50 days since the fire occurred. Note how green the scared area has become with the return of ferns on the mountain slopes.

Except for the highway and Summerheaven, the public is not allowed to go anywhere in the National Forest. From what I was able to observe from the highway, most of the hiking trails with trailheads near the highway are ok, at least partially. Parts of Lower Butterfly Trail and Green Mountain Trail don’t look good from a distance.

My guess is that the trails in the forest around Summerheaven were burned like the two ridges north of Summerheaven. From a review of burn scar maps, the Marshall Gulch area to the north and west, which would include Carter Canyon, has been badly burned. For those of you who hike this area, It’s possible a lot of the Marshall and Mint Springs trails were destroyed. We may not know until November.

Since Sabino Creek originates along the Marshall Gulch Trail, the monsoon rains can result in a lot of potential flash flooding coming down through Sabino Canyon. So far, the rain amounts are very below average, but we are still in the monsoon season.

— kenne

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Images Taken From Catalina Highway by kenne

 

Wilderness of Rocks In Pusch Ridge Wilderness   Leave a comment

Wilderness Trail August 2011 - 2011-08-12 at 12-22-35-72Wilderness of Rocks In Pusch Ridge Wilderness — Images by kenne

Words by:  Edward Abbey, Aldo Leopold, Ralph Waldo Emerson,
John Muir, and Wallace Stegner

 

Wilderness FloorWilderness Floor

Giant Two-tailed Swallowtail — Photo-Artistry   1 comment

Two-tail SwallowtailGiant Two-tailed Swallowtail — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

 

Wildflowers In The Meadow   Leave a comment

SCVN Weds Walk 08-01-12Wildflowers In The Meadow (Mt. Lemmon) — Image by kenne

Wildflower Meadow, Medawisla

The many-
oared asters
are coracles;

the goldenrod
pods, triremes.
They do not

plan their
voyages
to please us.

The tangle
of brambles
and drupes shifts

only slightly
when the wind
attempts to

part the knee-
or waist-high stalks
and thorns. What will

you do or
be in that state
you fear and look

forward to,
when none of
them needs

us, after
the last
seeds leave?

— Stephanie Burt

Santa Catalina Prairie Clover   Leave a comment

Santa Catalina Prairie CloverBee On Santa Catalina Prairie Clover — Image by kenne

 

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly   3 comments

Black Swallowtail

Pipevine SwallowtailPipevine Swallowtail Butterfly On Thistle — Images by kenne

May the wings of the butterfly kiss the sun.
And find your shoulder to light on.
To bring you luck, happiness, and riches.
Today, tomorrow and beyond.

— An Irish Blessing 

 

Yellow-eyed Junco On The Forest Floor   1 comment

SCVN Weds Walk 08-01-12Yellow-eyed Junco (Coronado National Forest) — Image by kenne

Yellow-eyed Juncos shuffle through the leaf litter of pine and pine-oak forests with fire in their eyes—
a bright yellow-orange gleam that instantly sets them apart from the more widespread
Dark-eyed Junco. Otherwise, they share many of the markings of the “Red-backed”
form of Dark-eyed Junco, including a gray head, two-toned bill, reddish-brown back,
and white outer tail feathers that flash when they fly. This specialty of the southwestern U.S.
also occurs in mountain forests through Mexico to Guatemala. — Source: allaboutbirds.org

Santa Catalina Mountains   2 comments

Douglas Springs HikeView of the Santa Catalina Mountains from the Douglas Spring Trail in the Rincon Mountains — Panorama by kenne

Fly Amanita Mushroom   3 comments

SCVN Weds Walk 08-01-12Fly Amanita Mushroom — Image by kenne

Fly amanita is the most iconic toadstool species, with a white-gilled,
white-spotted, usually red mushroom, and is one of the most recognizable
and widely encountered in popular culture.
As the mushroom matures, the can becomes flatter
and recognizable in Victorian literature, including
Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland.”

Ladybug Convention   Leave a comment

Ladybug ConventionLadybug Convention — Image by kenne

 

Bighorn Fire One Week Out   1 comment

Big Horn Fire-06-13-20-72Sunset (June 12th, 2020) 

The Bighorn Fire began June 5th in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness. After burning a lot the southwest area of the front ridge,
it has now moved northeast, having burned over 7,000 acres.

Bighorn Fire-06-13-20-morning-72Sunrise (June 13th, 2020) — Images by kenne

This morning with little or no wind, evidence of smoke appears to have gone from our viewpoint.
However, looks deceive, since containment remains a 10% and is projected to not be contained before June 25th.

— kenne

 

The Bighorn Fire Intensifies Over Night   6 comments

Bighorn Fire-Sunset-06-09-20-1-72Late Wednesday, June 10th. Most of the smoke is from upper Pima Canyon, Finger Rock and Mt. Kimball. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-9-72Around 6:00 am Thursday, June 11th. The smoke has settled in over
the Catalina Mountains and beginning to move down into the Tucson basin.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-10-72The smell from the fire is very noticeable as I leave for my
morning walk in the neighborhood.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-5-72I’m now at the back of Tanuri Ridge as more of the smoke appears
to be leaving the mountains spreading over the Catalina Foothills.
I’m beginning to think I should have warned a facemask.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-6-72Now at the entrance of Tanuri Ridge and you can bearly make out
the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-7-72I used a Photoshop Dehaze filter on some of these images so in reality,
there was much more smoke and haze.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-8-72Tanuri Drive

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-72As I continued my walk, the parts of the fire appeared to be
backtracking to the west.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-2-72There’s very little wind this morning, so a lot of the news smoke
coming from downdrafts through where rain would typically
flow off the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-3-72A big plum of smoke coming from the Finger Rock area.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-4-72It is now around 8:00 am. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-11-72It is now around 10:30 am. The fire is now about a mile west of
Pima Canyon trailhead. (Because of my distance from the
mountains, I’m making an educated guess.)

The following copy is from Haidi Chewel, with the National Forest Service.

Bighorn Fire – June 11th, 2020 Morning Update

Pima County Sheriff’s Department issues “SET” notice

Acres: 4,769 Percent Containment: 10%

Start Date: June 5th, 2020 Cause: Lightning

Origin Location: Santa Catalina Mountains

Jurisdiction: Coronado National Forest, including portions of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness

Personnel: 391

Resources: 6 hotshot crews, 3 Type 2 hand crews, 7 Type 3 engines, 1 Type 4 engine, 7 Type 6 engines, 4 Type 1 helicopters, 1 Type 2 helicopter, 2 Type 3 helicopter, 10 water tenders

The Bighorn Fire remained active overnight, with flames being pushed downhill by downslope winds. Temperatures up to 106 degrees today and continued low humidity will increase fire activity. The fire will again be highly visible on the front range of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Crews will work to hold the fire perimeter and continue building fire lines, tying into control features such as roads and rock outcroppings. Additional aerial resources will support the crews on the ground with water and retardant drops.

Over the next several days’ communities can expect to see crews and apparatus working in an around subdivisions in the Catalina Foothills. Members of the public are advised to drive with caution and leave roadways clear for emergency vehicles and equipment to pass.

 

 

 

Closed   1 comment

Sabino Canyon (1 of 1)-20-Edit-1-B&W-72Sabino Canyon Recreation Area Main Entrance — Image by kenne

The Sabino Canyon Recreation Area has been closed since March 20th and will remain so till further notice.

Naturalist, Ed Rawl — Kind Words For A Very Special Man   2 comments

Butterfly TrailEd Rawl Over Looking the San Pedro Valley — Image by kenne

IN REMEMBERANCE

Edgar (Ed) Rawl passed away on April 18, 2020, after suffering a stroke. A celebration of life memorial service for Ed is planned for Saturday, May 9, 2020 (a simple ceremony in the desert was his expressed desire). We will meet in the overflow parking lot of Sabino Canyon at 6:00 am to beat the heat and walk a short distance from there. Ed’s friends are invited, and you may share your memories of him if you wish to do so. We will try to maintain social distancing and encourage everyone to wear a mask or other face covering.

“He was a soft-spoken, kind man who was always positive despite chronic health problems. He was good with the kids and a great colleague. He will be missed very much.” — Jan Labiner

. . . a beautiful remembrance and tribute to our good friend.” —  Phil Bentley

“Ed was a special person. I always think of him when I discuss with children why they should not get closer to the edge of a cliff (such as the dam overlook) than they are tall. Ed taught me that. His vast experience as a Park Ranger gave him the knowledge that never ceased to amaze me. RIP, my friend.” — Bill Kaufman

“Oh, I am so very sad…what a loss…he was such a special..pleasant person.” — Becky Duncan 

“Ed deserves this kind of tribute. Thank you!” — Dan Granger

“I remember so vividly our good friend Ed, our wonderful naturalist and hiker. It made me so sad to see our beautiful hike together….. and also glad ….. when I look at these mountains, I think Ed will be there somewhere!” — Alexa Von Bieberstein

“. . . a kind and gentle soul. Miss him greatly.” — Debbie and Jerry Bird

“. . . this special man who has been a treasure both for SCVN and all the people for whom he shared his love.  I remember with special fondness the day Ed led us on our hike to Thimble Peak.  I think of him and the rest of our small band every time I glimpse the peak.” — Tim Ralph

Ed was an incredible, kind, calm, and positive person. I knew the kids were lucky when they had him for their trip. I will miss him and remember him. Coming into the canyon will always invoke his memory to me, and his spirit will exist there for me.”Roberto Veranes

“He was a wonderful man.” — Linda Procter

“He was such a gentleman with a wonderful sense of humor.  He rarely spoke of his medical challenges, which were progressive.  Such an honorable man.  He will be missed.” — Nancy Murphy

“Ed has a style with children that was gentle, but firm. His ability to balance these two paradoxical qualities is what made him an exceptional man to be around. He had health issues for some time, but for the longest time, he fought them off, so to keep hiking. He was a fighter. ‘Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.'” — Kenne Turner

“It is still difficult for me to process this, and I suspect friends and many Nats must be dealing with a terrible sense of loss and sadness. Ed was a second mentor to me when I began in Elementary Program on Thursdays. I still use his “Lizzie” device with the NYSI kit…haven’t found anything better. He was knowledgeable, patient, possessed a wonderful dry wit, and thought deeply about many things, such as international affairs, and the role of the US in them.  His depth and breadth was astounding. He could be counted on to be there every week, and seldom made any mention of his health issues because, I think, he didn’t feel comfortable putting himself first.

It will be difficult to face a world without Ed in it.” — Jeff Hahn
An Album of Photos by kenne
Ed Rawl-Butterfly Trail 15 - 2012-06-01
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