Archive for the ‘Coronado National Forest’ Tag

Bighorn Fire One Week Out   Leave a comment

Big Horn Fire-06-13-20-72Sunset (June 12th, 2020) 

The Bighorn Fire began June 5th in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness. After burning a lot the southwest area of the front ridge,
it has now moved northeast, having burned over 7,000 acres.

Bighorn Fire-06-13-20-morning-72Sunrise (June 13th, 2020) — Images by kenne

This morning with little or no wind, evidence of smoke appears to have gone from our viewpoint.
However, looks deceive, since containment remains a 10% and is projected to not be contained before June 25th.

— kenne

 

The Bighorn Fire Intensifies Over Night   6 comments

Bighorn Fire-Sunset-06-09-20-1-72Late Wednesday, June 10th. Most of the smoke is from upper Pima Canyon, Finger Rock and Mt. Kimball. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-9-72Around 6:00 am Thursday, June 11th. The smoke has settled in over
the Catalina Mountains and beginning to move down into the Tucson basin.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-10-72The smell from the fire is very noticeable as I leave for my
morning walk in the neighborhood.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-5-72I’m now at the back of Tanuri Ridge as more of the smoke appears
to be leaving the mountains spreading over the Catalina Foothills.
I’m beginning to think I should have warned a facemask.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-6-72Now at the entrance of Tanuri Ridge and you can bearly make out
the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-7-72I used a Photoshop Dehaze filter on some of these images so in reality,
there was much more smoke and haze.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-8-72Tanuri Drive

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-72As I continued my walk, the parts of the fire appeared to be
backtracking to the west.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-2-72There’s very little wind this morning, so a lot of the news smoke
coming from downdrafts through where rain would typically
flow off the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-3-72A big plum of smoke coming from the Finger Rock area.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-4-72It is now around 8:00 am. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-11-72It is now around 10:30 am. The fire is now about a mile west of
Pima Canyon trailhead. (Because of my distance from the
mountains, I’m making an educated guess.)

The following copy is from Haidi Chewel, with the National Forest Service.

Bighorn Fire – June 11th, 2020 Morning Update

Pima County Sheriff’s Department issues “SET” notice

Acres: 4,769 Percent Containment: 10%

Start Date: June 5th, 2020 Cause: Lightning

Origin Location: Santa Catalina Mountains

Jurisdiction: Coronado National Forest, including portions of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness

Personnel: 391

Resources: 6 hotshot crews, 3 Type 2 hand crews, 7 Type 3 engines, 1 Type 4 engine, 7 Type 6 engines, 4 Type 1 helicopters, 1 Type 2 helicopter, 2 Type 3 helicopter, 10 water tenders

The Bighorn Fire remained active overnight, with flames being pushed downhill by downslope winds. Temperatures up to 106 degrees today and continued low humidity will increase fire activity. The fire will again be highly visible on the front range of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Crews will work to hold the fire perimeter and continue building fire lines, tying into control features such as roads and rock outcroppings. Additional aerial resources will support the crews on the ground with water and retardant drops.

Over the next several days’ communities can expect to see crews and apparatus working in an around subdivisions in the Catalina Foothills. Members of the public are advised to drive with caution and leave roadways clear for emergency vehicles and equipment to pass.

 

 

 

Bighorn Fire In Pusch Ridge Wilderness   1 comment

big-horn-fire-1-for-web-72The Bighorn Wildfire burns in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness near Oro Valley on Saturday, June 6, 2020.
The fire was caused by lightning on the evening of June 5, 2020. —
Christopher Conover/AZPM

The Bighorn Wildfire grew to about 200 acres on Saturday. Officials with the Coronado National Forest said Saturday afternoon
that three hotshot crews were on scene working to contain the fire.

Tanker planes and helicopters have been dropping fire retardant and water on the fire burning less than a mile from La Reserve.

The wildfire has impacted several trails in the Catalinas: Romero Canyon; Pusch Peak; Pima Canyon; Finger Rock; Ventana Canyon.

Bighorn WIldfire from Patio-72Bighorn Wildfire smoke glows red and orange in the setting sun. — Image from his patio by kenne

Clouds Above, Mountains Below   2 comments

Mt Bigelow 07-15-13Clouds Above, Mountains Below — Photo-Artistry

A hoodoo sentry

Clouds above, mountains below

A lookout Tower.

— kenne

Closed   1 comment

Sabino Canyon (1 of 1)-20-Edit-1-B&W-72Sabino Canyon Recreation Area Main Entrance — Image by kenne

The Sabino Canyon Recreation Area has been closed since March 20th and will remain so till further notice.

Naturalist, Ed Rawl — Kind Words For A Very Special Man   2 comments

Butterfly TrailEd Rawl Over Looking the San Pedro Valley — Image by kenne

IN REMEMBERANCE

Edgar (Ed) Rawl passed away on April 18, 2020, after suffering a stroke. A celebration of life memorial service for Ed is planned for Saturday, May 9, 2020 (a simple ceremony in the desert was his expressed desire). We will meet in the overflow parking lot of Sabino Canyon at 6:00 am to beat the heat and walk a short distance from there. Ed’s friends are invited, and you may share your memories of him if you wish to do so. We will try to maintain social distancing and encourage everyone to wear a mask or other face covering.

“He was a soft-spoken, kind man who was always positive despite chronic health problems. He was good with the kids and a great colleague. He will be missed very much.” — Jan Labiner

. . . a beautiful remembrance and tribute to our good friend.” —  Phil Bentley

“Ed was a special person. I always think of him when I discuss with children why they should not get closer to the edge of a cliff (such as the dam overlook) than they are tall. Ed taught me that. His vast experience as a Park Ranger gave him the knowledge that never ceased to amaze me. RIP, my friend.” — Bill Kaufman

“Oh, I am so very sad…what a loss…he was such a special..pleasant person.” — Becky Duncan 

“Ed deserves this kind of tribute. Thank you!” — Dan Granger

“I remember so vividly our good friend Ed, our wonderful naturalist and hiker. It made me so sad to see our beautiful hike together….. and also glad ….. when I look at these mountains, I think Ed will be there somewhere!” — Alexa Von Bieberstein

“. . . a kind and gentle soul. Miss him greatly.” — Debbie and Jerry Bird

“. . . this special man who has been a treasure both for SCVN and all the people for whom he shared his love.  I remember with special fondness the day Ed led us on our hike to Thimble Peak.  I think of him and the rest of our small band every time I glimpse the peak.” — Tim Ralph

Ed was an incredible, kind, calm, and positive person. I knew the kids were lucky when they had him for their trip. I will miss him and remember him. Coming into the canyon will always invoke his memory to me, and his spirit will exist there for me.”Roberto Veranes

“He was a wonderful man.” — Linda Procter

“He was such a gentleman with a wonderful sense of humor.  He rarely spoke of his medical challenges, which were progressive.  Such an honorable man.  He will be missed.” — Nancy Murphy

“Ed has a style with children that was gentle, but firm. His ability to balance these two paradoxical qualities is what made him an exceptional man to be around. He had health issues for some time, but for the longest time, he fought them off, so to keep hiking. He was a fighter. ‘Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.'” — Kenne Turner

“It is still difficult for me to process this, and I suspect friends and many Nats must be dealing with a terrible sense of loss and sadness. Ed was a second mentor to me when I began in Elementary Program on Thursdays. I still use his “Lizzie” device with the NYSI kit…haven’t found anything better. He was knowledgeable, patient, possessed a wonderful dry wit, and thought deeply about many things, such as international affairs, and the role of the US in them.  His depth and breadth was astounding. He could be counted on to be there every week, and seldom made any mention of his health issues because, I think, he didn’t feel comfortable putting himself first.

It will be difficult to face a world without Ed in it.” — Jeff Hahn
An Album of Photos by kenne
Ed Rawl-Butterfly Trail 15 - 2012-06-01

Day By Day, Moment by Moment   2 comments

Blooming Sabino Canyon (1 of 1)-72Blooming Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

In this age of the Novel Coronavirus, things are changing day by day, moment by moment. I just got word that the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center and parking lot have been close to the public. However, since Sabino Canyon is in the Coronado National Forest, access is still available through the Overflow Parking Lot north of the Canyon’s main entrance. A fee tube is located there that accepts exact change for an $8.00 day-use pass. At least, for now, we can still experience springtime in the Canyon.

— kenne

Pima Canyon Trail Hike To The Dam   Leave a comment

Pima Canyon Hike-72.jpgNovember 8, 2019, SCVN hike in Pima Canyon — Images by kenne

Pima Canyon is one of several canyons in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness area
of the Santa Catalina Mountains in northwest Tucson.

Pima Canyon Hike-2-72.jpg

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) are devoted to helping people of all ages
appreciate the natural wonder of Sabino Canyon and the Coronado National Forest,
managed by the U.S. Forest Service.

Pima Canyon Hike-3-72

The SCVN led hike started at 8:30 am with 20 people at the trailhead (2900 feet
elevation) hiking to the lower dam a one-way distance of 3.2 miles (3750 feet elevation). 

Pima Canyon Hike-4-72

Once at the natural dam the hikers took a brief rest and had a snack before returning to the trailhead.

(The SCVN Guides were Kenne Turner, Jeff Orenstein, and Jane Gellman.)

Hiking the Aspen Draw Loop   1 comment

Aspen Drew Hike 07-05-19-1-72The July 5th SCVN Friday Hikes began at the Sky Valley parking lot
where led guide Phil Bentley greeted everyone and covered the SCVN Safety Rules.
This was a six-mile loop connecting three trails, (Aspen Draw, Mt. Lemmon Trail,
and the Meadow Trail) with an elevation gain of 1,200 feet. 

Meadow Triail Hike 07-23-12One of the interest points on this hike was the Lemmon Rock Lookout staffed by the Forest Service personnel.

Meadow Triail Hike 07-23-12The original tower was erected in 1928.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-2-72On this day we were able to get a tour of the Lookout
since Phil called ahead and talked to the Forest Ranger on duty at the Lookout this summer.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-72.jpgThe Osborne Fire Finder.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-7-72.jpgView down into the Tucson Basin and the Santa Rita Mountains.

Aspen Drew Hike 07-05-19-Panorama-72After the tour, we took a snack break before continuing the hike.

Aspen Drew Hike-4-Phil-72A little music from our leader.

Aspen Drew Hike-3-72.jpg

Aspen Drew Hike-2-72

Lemmon Rock-Mark-IMG-4474-72Always a fun time hiking in the Santa Catalina Mountains. — Images by kenne

 

Miller Creek Trail   5 comments

Miller Creek TrailMiller Creek Trail in the Rincon Mountains — Digital Art by kenne

“When you go out into the woods and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it. You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree. The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying ‘You’re too this, or I’m too this.’ That judging mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are.”

– Ram Dass

Cochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains   1 comment

Cochise StrongholdCochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains — Panorama by kenne

This rugged natural fortress was, for some 15 years, the home and base of operations for the famed Chiricahua Apache Chief, Cochise.  Cochise and about 1,000 of his followers, of whom some 250 were warriors, located here.

Born in present-day Arizona, Cochise led the Chiricahua band of the Apache tribe during a period of violent social upheaval. In 1850, the United States took control over the territory that today comprises Arizona and New Mexico.  Not hostile to the whites at first, he kept peace with the Anglo-Americans until 1861, when he became their implacable foe because of the blunder of a young U.S. Army officer, Lt. George Bascom.   In that year, Cochise and several of his relatives had gone to an encampment of soldiers in order to deny the accusation that they had abducted a child from a ranch. The boy was later proved to have been kidnapped by another band of Apaches.

During the parley, Cochise and his followers were ordered held as hostages by Bascom, but Cochise managed to escape almost immediately by cutting a hole in a tent. Bascom later ordered the other Apache hostages hanged, and the embittered Cochise joined forces with Mangas Coloradas, his father-in-law, in a guerrilla struggle against the American army and settlers. The capture and murder of Mangas Coloradas in 1863 left Cochise as the Apache war chief.   The U.S. Army captured him in 1871 and prepared to transfer the Chiricahua to a reservation hundreds of miles away, but he escaped again and renewed the resistance campaign. The following year after negotiating a new treaty with the help of Thomas Jeffords, the band was allowed to stay in their homeland.

— Source: Coronado National Forest

Hiking The Aspen Loop In The Santa Catalina Mountains — Photo Essay   6 comments

Hikers-2840 blog IIHikers in a New Aspen Grove Up from Marshall Gulch On Mt. Lemmon — Image by kenne

In 2003 the Aspen Fire destroyed many homes in Summerheaven and thousands of acres on Mt. Lemmon. Last Friday the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists led hike was on the Aspen Loop that goes through some of the areas destroyed, now recovered by new aspen and pine groves. 

A precursor to the Aspen Fire was the Bollock Fire, 2002 in the eastern part of the Catalinas. Parts of the area burned in 2002 is now experiencing the Burro Fire that started Friday and has now consumed 9,000 acres. The Burro Fire is one of a half-dozen wildfires in the Coronado National Forest. Did I say it is hot and very dry in southeastern Arizona?

— kenne

Slideshow images by kenne

 

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