Archive for the ‘Coronado National Forest’ Tag

Miller Creek Trail   5 comments

Miller Creek TrailMiller Creek Trail in the Rincon Mountains — Digital Art by kenne

“When you go out into the woods and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it. You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree. The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying ‘You’re too this, or I’m too this.’ That judging mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are.”

– Ram Dass

Cochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains   1 comment

Cochise StrongholdCochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains — Panorama by kenne

This rugged natural fortress was, for some 15 years, the home and base of operations for the famed Chiricahua Apache Chief, Cochise.  Cochise and about 1,000 of his followers, of whom some 250 were warriors, located here.

Born in present-day Arizona, Cochise led the Chiricahua band of the Apache tribe during a period of violent social upheaval. In 1850, the United States took control over the territory that today comprises Arizona and New Mexico.  Not hostile to the whites at first, he kept peace with the Anglo-Americans until 1861, when he became their implacable foe because of the blunder of a young U.S. Army officer, Lt. George Bascom.   In that year, Cochise and several of his relatives had gone to an encampment of soldiers in order to deny the accusation that they had abducted a child from a ranch. The boy was later proved to have been kidnapped by another band of Apaches.

During the parley, Cochise and his followers were ordered held as hostages by Bascom, but Cochise managed to escape almost immediately by cutting a hole in a tent. Bascom later ordered the other Apache hostages hanged, and the embittered Cochise joined forces with Mangas Coloradas, his father-in-law, in a guerrilla struggle against the American army and settlers. The capture and murder of Mangas Coloradas in 1863 left Cochise as the Apache war chief.   The U.S. Army captured him in 1871 and prepared to transfer the Chiricahua to a reservation hundreds of miles away, but he escaped again and renewed the resistance campaign. The following year after negotiating a new treaty with the help of Thomas Jeffords, the band was allowed to stay in their homeland.

— Source: Coronado National Forest

Hiking The Aspen Loop In The Santa Catalina Mountains — Photo Essay   6 comments

Hikers-2840 blog IIHikers in a New Aspen Grove Up from Marshall Gulch On Mt. Lemmon — Image by kenne

In 2003 the Aspen Fire destroyed many homes in Summerheaven and thousands of acres on Mt. Lemmon. Last Friday the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists led hike was on the Aspen Loop that goes through some of the areas destroyed, now recovered by new aspen and pine groves. 

A precursor to the Aspen Fire was the Bollock Fire, 2002 in the eastern part of the Catalinas. Parts of the area burned in 2002 is now experiencing the Burro Fire that started Friday and has now consumed 9,000 acres. The Burro Fire is one of a half-dozen wildfires in the Coronado National Forest. Did I say it is hot and very dry in southeastern Arizona?

— kenne

Slideshow images by kenne

 

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Sabino Canyon Picnic Site   Leave a comment

Romero PoolsSabino Canyon Picnic Site with View of Thimble Peak (February 2017) — Image by kenne

Thimble Peak (Elevation 5,323 ft.) is a landmark in the Santa Catalina Mountains on the ridge that divides Sabino Canyon and Bear Canyon.

— kenne

National Public Lands Day Is September 24th   Leave a comment

invasive-plants-1-of-1-pampas-grass-blogPampas Grass In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

For many, pampas grass is an ornamental landscape plant, for others it’s an environmentally dangerous plant that crowds out indigenous desert plants and can become kneeling for wildfires. Sabino Canyon has a lot of pampas grass, fountain grass, buffel grass and other invasive plants. The battle to remove these invasive plants continues on National Public Lands Day as Sabino Stewards (Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists) and community members will be digging, pulling, and bagging invasive plants near the Sabino Creek area. This activity is one of several activities that will be taking place in the Coronado National Forest September 24th on Public Lands Day. All fees are waived for the day.

— kenne

Once an invasive species arrives, it’s about impossible yo get rid of it.

— Sean Hanna

Mt. Lemmon Fall Colors And The Story Of The First Ski Slope   1 comment

Images by kenne (Click on any of the images for larger view and slideshow.)

For you non-locals, Mt. Lemmon (9,157 ft.) is in the Santa Catalina Mountains, part of the Coronado National Forest in southern Arizona.

At this time all National Forest Services continue to be closed because of the government shut-down. However, access to Mt. Lemmon via the Catalina Highway is available since the highway is a county highway.

The Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) are part of the Forest Service and regularly provide educational programs, nature walks and hikes — the schedule is published on the SCVN website. Some of the SCVN members continue the hiking schedule (unofficially), recently hiking the Bear Wallow trail to take in the fall colors.

Parts of the trail goes through the area where the original Mt. Lemmon ski slope was located back in the 40’s and 50’s. Since part of SCVN mission to the public is to educate, Ricki Mensching shares the story of early skiing on Mt. Lemmon during the Bear Wallow hike this past Friday. Current skiing takes place each at winter at Ski Valley, the southernmost ski destination in the continental United States, and receives approximately 180 inches (4.6 m) of snow annually (Wikipedia).

kenne

A Non-Official Friday Hike In The Coronado National Forest   7 comments

Closed Entrance To Sabino Canyon.

Closed Entrance To Sabino Canyon.

Today is day four in the Government Shutdown. Sabino Canyon Recreational Area, which is in the Coronado National Forest north of Tucson, Arizona is closed. The Coronado National Forest covers about 1.78 million acres in the mountain ranges of southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico.The US Forest Service provides a lot of services in the National Forest, which are now suspended until funding is again available.

Today's Non-Official Friday Hiking Group.

Today’s Non-Official Friday Hiking Group.

Sabino Canyon Recreational Area is a very busy place, year-round. Many of the services, events and programs, i.e., school programs, nature walks, hikes and demonstrations are provided by volunteers — Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (Click here to learn more.) All these activities are not happening until the Government Shutdown is over.

One of the regular programs is Friday hikes. For a few of us, today’s hike went on as scheduled, unofficially, from the old Prison Camp on the Sycamore Canyon/Reservoir trail (3.5 miles one-way with a 821 feet gain). By doing so, we made sure those following the published hiking schedule would still have an opportunity to hike after showing up.

It was an enjoyable day hiking in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains — check out the beautiful blue sky.

kenne

Sycamore Reservoir Area With Thimble Pike In The Background.

Sycamore Reservoir Area With Thimble Pike In The Background.

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