Archive for the ‘Pima Canyon’ Tag

The Bighorn Fire Intensifies Over Night   6 comments

Bighorn Fire-Sunset-06-09-20-1-72Late Wednesday, June 10th. Most of the smoke is from upper Pima Canyon, Finger Rock and Mt. Kimball. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-9-72Around 6:00 am Thursday, June 11th. The smoke has settled in over
the Catalina Mountains and beginning to move down into the Tucson basin.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-10-72The smell from the fire is very noticeable as I leave for my
morning walk in the neighborhood.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-5-72I’m now at the back of Tanuri Ridge as more of the smoke appears
to be leaving the mountains spreading over the Catalina Foothills.
I’m beginning to think I should have warned a facemask.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-6-72Now at the entrance of Tanuri Ridge and you can bearly make out
the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-7-72I used a Photoshop Dehaze filter on some of these images so in reality,
there was much more smoke and haze.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-8-72Tanuri Drive

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-72As I continued my walk, the parts of the fire appeared to be
backtracking to the west.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-2-72There’s very little wind this morning, so a lot of the news smoke
coming from downdrafts through where rain would typically
flow off the mountains.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-3-72A big plum of smoke coming from the Finger Rock area.

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-4-72It is now around 8:00 am. 

Bighorn Fire-Morning-06-10-20-11-72It is now around 10:30 am. The fire is now about a mile west of
Pima Canyon trailhead. (Because of my distance from the
mountains, I’m making an educated guess.)

The following copy is from Haidi Chewel, with the National Forest Service.

Bighorn Fire – June 11th, 2020 Morning Update

Pima County Sheriff’s Department issues “SET” notice

Acres: 4,769 Percent Containment: 10%

Start Date: June 5th, 2020 Cause: Lightning

Origin Location: Santa Catalina Mountains

Jurisdiction: Coronado National Forest, including portions of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness

Personnel: 391

Resources: 6 hotshot crews, 3 Type 2 hand crews, 7 Type 3 engines, 1 Type 4 engine, 7 Type 6 engines, 4 Type 1 helicopters, 1 Type 2 helicopter, 2 Type 3 helicopter, 10 water tenders

The Bighorn Fire remained active overnight, with flames being pushed downhill by downslope winds. Temperatures up to 106 degrees today and continued low humidity will increase fire activity. The fire will again be highly visible on the front range of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Crews will work to hold the fire perimeter and continue building fire lines, tying into control features such as roads and rock outcroppings. Additional aerial resources will support the crews on the ground with water and retardant drops.

Over the next several days’ communities can expect to see crews and apparatus working in an around subdivisions in the Catalina Foothills. Members of the public are advised to drive with caution and leave roadways clear for emergency vehicles and equipment to pass.

 

 

 

Bighorn Wildfire In Pima Canyon   4 comments

At first glance, this may look like a volcano erupting.

Bighorn Fire in Pima Canyon-1-72But, it’s the Bighorn Wildfire now having worked it’s way

Bighorn Fire Pima Canyon-2-72into Pima Canyon and the Finger Rock area of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness (June 10, 2020).

Pima Canyon October 2011The Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists lead hikes twice a year on the Pima Canyon Trail to a natural dam (6 miles round trip).
— — Images by kenne

Bighorn Fire Photos, June 9, 2020   1 comment

 

Bighorn Fire -06-09-20-72

Bighorn Fire-06-09-20-2-72

Bighorn Fire-7-06-09-20-72

Bighorn Fire-9-06-09-20-72

Bighorn Fire-10-06-09-20-72

Bighorn Fire-11-06-09-20-72Bighorn Wildfire In the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, Santa Catalina Mountains (June 9, 2020) — Images by kenne

The bighorn wildfire that was lightning-caused June 5, 2020, has now entered the upper elevation of Pima Cayon in the
Pusch Ridge Wilderness. The fire has now burned 3,277 acres. At various times, depending on wind conditions,
the mountains
and foothills are covered with a haze of smoke. — kenne

Pima Canyon Trail Hike To The Dam   Leave a comment

Pima Canyon Hike-72.jpgNovember 8, 2019, SCVN hike in Pima Canyon — Images by kenne

Pima Canyon is one of several canyons in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness area
of the Santa Catalina Mountains in northwest Tucson.

Pima Canyon Hike-2-72.jpg

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) are devoted to helping people of all ages
appreciate the natural wonder of Sabino Canyon and the Coronado National Forest,
managed by the U.S. Forest Service.

Pima Canyon Hike-3-72

The SCVN led hike started at 8:30 am with 20 people at the trailhead (2900 feet
elevation) hiking to the lower dam a one-way distance of 3.2 miles (3750 feet elevation). 

Pima Canyon Hike-4-72

Once at the natural dam the hikers took a brief rest and had a snack before returning to the trailhead.

(The SCVN Guides were Kenne Turner, Jeff Orenstein, and Jane Gellman.)

Painted Sunset   Leave a comment

Lower Pima Canyon-Edit-4-art-2-72Painted Sunset–  Photo-Artistry by kenne

Painted with a romantic brush
best experienced with a lover
kissing the sunset together.

— kenne

Lower Pima Canyon   Leave a comment

lower pima canyon-edit-4-art-72Lower Pima Canyon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

This canyon is an entrance
from the city to the wilderness
where I have emerged longing
for a life different yet familiar
and pleasing surrounded by
the shadows of darkness.

— kenne

Hiking Pima Canyon (January 27, 2017)   1 comment

pima-canyon-panorama-blog

Hiking Pima Canyon (January 27, 2017) — Photo Essay by kenne

Hiking Pima Canyon And Becoming Intrigued With A Flock Of Ravens   Leave a comment

The first gallery of photos was taken on the SCVN Friday hike in Pima Canyon (November 6, 2015). During the hike we notice a flock of ravens, not a common sight since raven tend to be solitary or in pairs. So, later in the day I did a little research on ravens. The best answer I could find for why ravens might flock together was that of young migrating ravens.

(Click on any of the images for a larger view in a slideshow format.)

Young Ravens may form juvenile flocks or “gangs”, which helps them when they are foraging for food.  They actually play together, flying and catching objects in the air.  They will make their own toys for entertainment, play with wolves or dogs in a game of chase, and even slide down snow hills — interesting!

Like many people, I’m fascinated by these very intelligent birds and take photos of them at every opportunity. Here are a few.

kenne

Images by kenne

Goldeneye   Leave a comment

Goldeneye (1 of 1) grunge art 1 blogGoldeneye Wildflower — Computer Art by kenne

“The primitive notion of the

efficacy of images presumes

that images possess

the qualities of real things,

but our inclination is to

attribute to real things

the qualities of images.”

— Susan Sontag

My Sky Island   1 comment

Wildflowers Goldeneye(1 of 1)Grunge Art blog 2Goldeneye In Pima Canyon — Grunge Art by kenne

My mountains,

Santa Catalina, one

of the Sonoran Desert’s

sky islands, presenting 

a life zone tour

of desert,

grasslands,

oat woodlands,

and pine forest

where climate diversity

is equal to a drive

from Mexico to Canada,

with panorama views

of surrounding Sky Islands —

where less becomes more.

— kenne

Cactus Wren On A Saguaro Blossom In November   5 comments

Cactus Wren (1 of 1) blogCactus Wren On A Saguaro Blossom In November — Image by kenne

Today’s Friday hike was in Pima Canyon. The canyon is a narrow canyon in the western Catalina Mountains. With sunrise coming later in early November and much cooler desert temperatures (39 degrees), the beginning part of the trail was in the warmth of the sun till the canyon walls cast a big shadow on the canyon. As we hiked into the canyon I notict a cactus wren on a saguaro blossom. This is not the time of the year for saguaros to be blooming, but don’t tell this one that. The combination of the cactus wren and the saguaro blossom really got my attention, so even though the sun light angle was not ideal, and the cactus was a good distance away, I had to get a picture or two. 

kenne

Ocotillos Are Beginning to Leaf In The Sonoran Desert   3 comments

Ocotillo, Desert’s “Gray Sticks” are Beginning to Turn Green — Images by kenne

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