Archive for the ‘SCVN’ Category

Learning About Nature   Leave a comment

Elementary Program-5-Art-3-72“Learning About Nature” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists teaching children about nature in Sabino Canyon.

 

Sabino Canyon Nature Program For Elementary School Students   Leave a comment

One of the subjects we teach is geology, how the Santa Catalina Mountains were
formed, and the importance of water in the formation of Sabino Canyon. Twelve
million years ago, the Santa Catalina Mountains were just a range of hills, but the
earth’s crust in western North America was being stretched. What resulted were
huge blocks with steep vaults forming an up-and-down landscape called the
Basin and Range Province. 

Kenne & 3rd Grade Students-72Naturalist, Kenne Turner with 3rd Grade Students (Sabino Canyon Dam Area)
— Images by Teacher

Sabino Canyon is composed of a hard metamorphic rock called “Catalina gneiss.”
Gneiss contains rock and five minerals; quartz, mica, feldspar, magnetite, and garnets.
Over time water and earthquakes have eroded the gneiss rock carrying smaller rocks
and minerals down streams like Sabino Creek. The minerals are deposited along the
creek edges, which created a natural laboratory to learn about the minerals by panning
for garnets. Need I say, kids love panning for garnets.    

Kenne&3rd Grade Students-72Students panning for garnets in Sabino Creek.

“For many Tucsonans, the canyon is an old friend. We are on a first-name basis.
On a sunny weekend morning, we say, simply, “Let’s go to Sabino.

— from Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis by David Wentworth Lazaroff

Catalina Highway Hoodoos   3 comments

Hoodoos-15-72

There’s a narrow trail that you have to scramble up a few feet before heading down under twisted alligator junipers. The best way to experience these ancient hoodoos along the Catalina Highway is to attack them from the rear, sorta speak.

This SCVN Friday Hike was to have two parts; explore the hoodoos followed by a hike from the Gordon Hirabayashi Campgrounds to Molino Basin. The hoodoos segment was led by naturalist Edi Moore, who is s long-time member of the Monday Morning Milers (MMM). The MMM was the first hiking group I begin hiking with after moving to Tucson. It was with the MMM that I first had an opportunity to explore the Catalina Highway Hoodoos. Of the 20 hikers on this Friday, Edi and I were the only ones to which this experience was not new. The views in and around the hoodoos are something else.

— kenne

 

Images by kenne
Click here to see more Catalina Highway Hoodoo photos.

A Beautiful Morning In Sabino Canyon   Leave a comment

Bear Canyon Trail-72.jpgBear Canyon Trail In Sabino Canyon Recreational Area — Image by kenne

We spent this morning teaching 2nd-grade students how the Hohokam peoples of southern Arizona lived hundreds of years ago. The Hohokam left much evidence of their presence in Sabino Canyon, which was not only their home but also the source of food, clothing, and shelter materials. Over the years, the Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have developed activities, Back to the Past (BTTP), geared toward explaining the Hohokam and how they existed in the Sonoran Desert.

Today was such a beautiful fall day in Sabino Canyon, I had to share at least one image taken on our walk back to the Visitor Center.

— kenne

Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing of pastel colored cliffs
      Where, under sapphire skies,
      The raincloud gently drifts.
      Of wondrous sunlit valleys wide,
      Timeless home of your clan — your tribe.
Could I but speak your tongue
      I would sing a prayer that in future days
      You would ever honor your ancient ways,
      And that the Gods of health and peace
      In their boundless blessings, never cease,
      To be generous to these children here below,
      These children of the Desert.

— C. J. Colby, “Song to the Indian,” Arizona Highways, August 1973

 

 

Jim Martin, In Loving Memory Of A Great Naturalist   1 comment

Jim and B.J. Martin-Edit-1-72.jpgJim and B.J. Martin, May 7, 2018 , were honored by achieving Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) Emeritus Status.
— Image by kenne

I went to another funeral today, something I began doing at an early age while living with my grandparents. Old people’s friends die. Back then I didn’t always know the people and spent my time running around the graveyard across the road from the church with other children, in a small northeast Alabama rural town.

It’s different today being one of the old people whose friends are dying. When I became an SCVN member in 2011, Jim Martin had been an active member for 23 years, teaching elementary school children about nature and conservation, leading and participating in SCVN  hikes, and serving a treasurer, VP, and President of SCVN. I first met Jim on one of the SCVN Friday Hikes. He was an 82-year-old active hiker, a quiet, pleasant guy to be around — always smiling! 

Jim pasted away at the age of 90, July 16, 2019.

— kenne

 

 

A Hummingbird’s Nest   Leave a comment

A Symbiotic Relationship   3 comments

Lichen (1 of 1) blogLichens on rocks along the Wasson Peak trail. — Image by kenne

“Lichen is a composite organism consisting of a fungus (the mycobiont) and a photosynthetic partner (the photobiont or phycobiont) growing together in a symbiotic relationship. The photobiont is usually either a green alga (commonly Trebouxia) or cyanobacterium (commonly Nostoc).” 

When teaching children about lichen, Sabino Canyon Volunteer Nationalists (SCVN) share this short poem:

“Alice Algae took
a lichen
to Freddie Fungus,

but now
their relationship
is on the rocks.”

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