Archive for the ‘Geology’ Tag

Panning For Garnets   Leave a comment

Thursday Elementary January 24, 2019-11-Infrared-72Students Panning For Garnets In Sabino Creek — Infrared Image by kenne

One of the programs taught by Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists to elementary
school children is geology called “Strike It Rich.” They learn how the Santa Catalina
Mountains were formed and the minerals contained in the “gneiss” rock.
The primary
activity is panning for garnets (sand rubies) in Sabino Creek.
The students uncovered the link between the towering granite cliffs
above the Tucson Basin and all that lies below.

— kenne

Sabino Canyon Nature Program For Elementary School Students   Leave a comment

One of the subjects we teach is geology, how the Santa Catalina Mountains were
formed, and the importance of water in the formation of Sabino Canyon. Twelve
million years ago, the Santa Catalina Mountains were just a range of hills, but the
earth’s crust in western North America was being stretched. What resulted were
huge blocks with steep vaults forming an up-and-down landscape called the
Basin and Range Province. 

Kenne & 3rd Grade Students-72Naturalist, Kenne Turner with 3rd Grade Students (Sabino Canyon Dam Area)
— Images by Teacher

Sabino Canyon is composed of a hard metamorphic rock called “Catalina gneiss.”
Gneiss contains rock and five minerals; quartz, mica, feldspar, magnetite, and garnets.
Over time water and earthquakes have eroded the gneiss rock carrying smaller rocks
and minerals down streams like Sabino Creek. The minerals are deposited along the
creek edges, which created a natural laboratory to learn about the minerals by panning
for garnets. Need I say, kids love panning for garnets.    

Kenne&3rd Grade Students-72Students panning for garnets in Sabino Creek.

“For many Tucsonans, the canyon is an old friend. We are on a first-name basis.
On a sunny weekend morning, we say, simply, “Let’s go to Sabino.

— from Sabino Canyon: The Life of a Southwestern Oasis by David Wentworth Lazaroff

Naturalist Bruce Garrett, May He Rest In Peace   8 comments

Gneiss WalkBruce Garrett with His Talking Stick, Standing On A Gneiss Rock — Image by kenne

Most of this decade SCVN member Bruce Garrett led a geology walk, called “Gneiss Walk” in the Sabino Canyon Recreational Area. It has been a very popular walk, not only because he was very knowledgeable but because he was very entertaining. He loved talking to people.

Bruce will be dearly missed by all who had an opportunity to walk with him in Sabino Canyon and learn about the geology of the Santa Catalina Mountains. 

— kenne

Gneiss WalkKenne, Bryna, and Bruce in Sabino Canyon

 

Gneiss Walk   1 comment

Gneiss Walk in Rattlesnake Canyon — Images by kenne

Last week, SCVN Bruce Garrett conducted his inaugural “Gneiss Walk” in Sabino Canyon. Bruce, a retired geologist, will be leading the walk each week on the geology of Sabino Canyon. This walk is one of the best “focus walks” in the canyon, and knowing Bruce, it will continue to get better each week. I look forward to learning a lot from Bruce. The “Gneiss Walk” is a real nice walk!

kenne

(Click here for a Flickr “Gneiss Walk” slideshow.)

(Gneiss is a common and widely distributed type of rock formed by high-grade regional metamorphic processes from pre-existing formations that were originally either igneous orsedimentary rocks.)

(Image on the left — Bruce Garrett. Image on the right — Kenne, Bryna & Bruce)

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Turpentine (Bush) On The Rocks   Leave a comment

The fall flowers of the Turpentine Bush growing on Gneiss rocks. The rocks of the Santa Catalina Mountains are primarily granite and hard, banded, metamorphic Catalina gneiss. — Image by kenne

Capturing the Moment — Santa Catalina Mountains Geology Lesson   Leave a comment

Hiking In Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

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