Author Archive

Mesa Arch In Canyonlands   Leave a comment

Mesa Arch In Canyonlands — Image by kenne

“Canyonlands has more than 80 natural arches but arch hunters often bypass this park in favor of its neighbor, Arches National Park.
Canyonlands’ most famous arch is Mesa Arch in Willow Flat in the Island in the Sky District. It’s a favorite place
to watch the sunrise and photograph the night skies.”
Source — myutahparks.com

Cactus Blossoms   1 comment

Cactus Blossoms — Image by kenne

Even though the southwest is experiencing a mega drought, nature finds a way to continue life cycles.

“Drought conditions in the West, particularly the desert Southwest, have intensified over the past 45 years,
with less precipitation and longer and more frequent dry spells between storms. The Southwestern deserts
that include Tucson were slammed the hardest by far.” Arizona Daily Star

Doubtful Canyon, 360   Leave a comment

Doubtful Canyon, 360 (12-08-12) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Standing In The Eye

Look around
what do you see?

A bright sun
in a blue sky

above a desert
of rocks and sand

surrounded by
mountain ranges —

look again and
you will see life

you can only see
standing in the eye.

— kenne

Rock Hibiscus On Hope Camp Trail   2 comments

Rock Hibiscus on Hope Camp Trail — Image by kenne

A Rock Hibiscus

Almost abandoned by spring

Lonely on the trail.

— kenne

 

Arches National Park   Leave a comment

Arches National Park — Image by kenne

Arches National Park lies north of Moab in the state of Utah. Bordered by the Colorado River in the southeast, it’s
known as the site of more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches, such as the massive, red-hued Delicate Arch in the
east. Long, thin Landscape Arch stands in Devils Garden to the north. Other geological formations include Balanced
Rock, towering over the desert landscape in the middle of the park.― Google

 

Coyote Fence Corral   Leave a comment

Coyote Fence Corral In Doubtful Canyon — Images by kenne

Here is no water but only rock
Rock and no water and the sandy road
The road winding above among the mountains
Which are mountains of rock without water
If there were water we should stop and drink
Amongst the rock one cannot stop or think
Sweat is dry and feet are in the sand
If there were only water amongst the rock
Dead mountain mouth of carious teeth that cannot spit
Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit
There is not even silence in the mountains
But dry sterile thunder without rain
There is not even solitude in the mountains
But red sullen faces sneer and snarl
From doors of mudcracked houses
                                           If there were water
   And no rock
   If there were rock
   And also water
   And water
   A spring
   A pool among the rock
   If there were the sound of water only
   Not the cicada
   And dry grass singing
   But sound of water over a rock
   Where the hermit-thrush sings in the pine trees
   Drip drop drip drop drop drop drop
   But there is no water

— from The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot 

Desert Chicory And Seed Pod   1 comment

Desert Chicory & Seed Pod — Image by kenne

Frequent throughout the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and Mexico on desert flats,
along wash banks and on rocky slopes.

Mature seeds bear a plume of feathery bristles at the apex.

The Origin of Baseball   Leave a comment

It’s time to throw a baseball, so go for it. — kenne

Frank Hudson

Let’s hope I don’t overextend my love for American poet Kenneth Patchen with yet another example of his work today, which happens to be the opening day for baseball in my city. Patchen wasn’t quite the modern day spoken word poet, but even 80 years ago he was writing in a form that works in that presentation — though more here in a mode where the listener is immediately attracted by references to our common life and speaking idiom, and then finds the poem going off somewhere else between its lines before it ends.

Many poets are indifferent readers of their own work, but Patchen is usually quite good. I actually muffed one line in his text today, but Patchen has modified several lines, either from the variations of performance, or in the case of the lips of the “girls of heaven” he seems to choose a gentler metaphor here.

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Posted April 8, 2021 by kenneturner in Information

Shopping In Nogales   Leave a comment

Shopping in Nogales — Photo-Artistry by kenne

A walk through the shops

You can find most anything

Very organic.

— kenne

Spring — Bees On A Thistle   2 comments

Bees On A Thistle — Image by kenne

Spring

To what purpose, April, do you return again?

Beauty is not enough.

You can no longer quiet me with the redness

Of little leaves opening stickily.

I know what I know.

The sun is hot on my neck as I observe

The spikes of the crocus.

The smell of the earth is good.

It is apparent that there is no death.

But what does that signify?

Not only under ground are the brains of men

Eaten by maggots.

Life in itself

Is nothing,

An empty cup, a flight of uncarpeted stairs.

It is not enough that yearly, down this hill,

April

Comes like an idiot, babbling and strewing flowers.

— Edna St. Vincent Millay 

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument   1 comment

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument (03-21-12) — Image by kenne

This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre monument is a geologic treasure with some of the most spectacular
trails and views in the world. The monument contains many diverse landscapes, including the Paria Plateau,
Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. The monument borders Kaibab National Forest to the west
and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to the east. The monument includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
Cliffs Wilderness. Elevations range from 3,100 to 7,100 feet. The monument is also home to a growing number
of endangered California condors. Each year, condors hatched and raised in a captive breeding program are
released in the monument. To visit the monument, you’ll need extra planning and awareness of potential
hazards. Most roads need a high clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle due to deep sand.

— Source: The Bureau of Land Management

Spring Wildflowers In The Sonoran Desert   Leave a comment

Spring Wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

A very dry spring

Some wildflowers beat the odds

Flaunting the experts.

— kenne

Silhouette In The Mission Window   Leave a comment

San Xavier del Bac Mission Window — Image by kenne

Silhouette In The Window

 He sits in the dark
A silhouette in the light
Shinning through God’s window
My subject of admiration
A glowing image in the darkness
Only to become the stuff of dreams

— kenne

Borderland Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Borderland Wildflowers — Image by kenne

Ask the spring,
in its beauty
no stranger 
to this land.

Who is the man
pale and bloody
his wounds from
miles of walking?

— kenne

Capturing The Moment — Flowers and Bees   Leave a comment

Becoming is Superior to Being

Esperero Trail Wildflowers Spring 2013

Esperero Trail Wildflowers Spring 2013Desert Chicory and Bee — Images by kenne

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Posted April 5, 2021 by kenneturner in Information

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