Archive for the ‘Tanuri Ridge’ Category

Katelyn At Sunset   Leave a comment

silhouette katelyn-72Katelyn at Sunset (March 2017) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Come away, O human child!

To the waters and the wild

With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world’s more full of weeping than you

can understand.

— from The Stolen Child by William Butler Yeats (Fairy and Folktales of the Irish Peasentry 1888) 

 

Pools Of Sorrow, Waves Of Joy — Revisited   Leave a comment

During this of the coronavirus as neighbors, we see one another more often,
all be it at a distance as we shelter at home, providing more time for things to drift
through my open mind. This posting first appeared in April 2014.

— kenne

Tanuri Ridge (1 of 1) blog framed“Waves of Joy” — Image by kenne
Palo Verde trees, common to the Sonoran Desert, brighten the Tucson area in the springtime with millions of five-petaled yellow blossoms.

OUR NEIGHBORHOOD — TRYING TO REASON

We traverse these streets,
sometimes early in the morning,
sometimes late in the day,
sometimes walking,
sometimes running —
always for a reason.

We wave at passersby,
sometimes we greet them,
sometimes it’s just a smile
sometimes we stop and talk,
sometimes walking together,
always for a reason.

We have neighborly expectations,
sometimes it’s watering plants,
sometimes it’s calling the ill,
sometimes it’s being complimentary,
sometimes it’s being watchful,
always for a reason.

We can be a convivial people,
sometimes we go out together,
occasionally we party together,
sometimes we join clubs together,
sometimes we share community work,
always for a reason.

We can be adversaries,
sometimes our expectations are not real,
sometimes we overreact,
sometimes we take reactions personally,
sometimes power is polarized, frustration generalized,
always for a reason.

We can be Pleasantville,
sometimes we are without color,
sometimes we are in pools of sorrow,
sometimes we are in waves of joy,
sometimes drifting through my open mind,
always for a reason.

— kenne

Tanuri Ridge (1 of 1) blog framed B-W“Pools of Sorrow” — Image by kenne

A Palo Verde Spring — Photo Essay   3 comments

Palo Verde-12-72

Tanuri Ridge Morning Walk — Images by kenne

A Young Visitor On Our Patio   9 comments

Cooper's Hawk-0-72A Visitor On The Patio (Immature Cooper’s Hawk) — Images by kenne

This immature Cooper’s Hawk perched on one of our patio chairs not far from the bird feeder frequented by doves for about one minute this morning. A mature hawk would have been up in the olive tree near the feeder. Even then, that doesn’t work as well as swooping from over the rooftop. They will learn. These images were taken through the patio door, which given the time of day the doors become a mirror.

— kenne

 

 

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Butterfly   Leave a comment

Two-tailed Swallowtail-72Two-Tailed Swallowtail Butterfly — Image by kenne

Beauty and size make the two-tailed swallowtail butterfly (Papilio multicaudata)  an impressive specimen with a nearly five-inch wingspan and a body that approaches two inches in length. So impressive that is was designated the Arizona state butterfly in 2001.

Near the top of the yellow wings are 4 markings of almost parallel black lines. The posterior portion of the wings holds blue dots surrounded by black markings that curve to form a “w” shape when the wings are open. Below these dots are more rectangular shaped orange bars emblazoned into the dark outline of the wing.

Cactus Blossom Twins   4 comments

Cactus Blossoms-72-2Cactus Blossom Twins — Image by kenne

Another great way to start the day.

kenne

Charm On Goldfinch, Charm On   1 comment

Lesser Goldfinch (1 of 1)-Edit-2-Edit-art-72“Goldfinches”– Photo-Artistry by kenne

Tomorrow is my grandson, Kenne Jaxon’s 8th birthday. It’s been about two years since we have seen our grandsons, Jaxon and Nick, so we had planned on visiting them in New Hampshire in May. Because of the pandemic, our plans have been put on hold. So I began to look for a gift to send Jaxon and in doing so became aware of a poetry book for children, The Lost Words, by Robert Macfarlane. It’s a collection of acrostic spell-poems, beautifully illustrated by Jackie Morris, each one devoted to a word removed from the Oxford Junior Dictionary. 

Robert Macfarlane is a British writer and Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He is best known for his books on landscape, nature, place, people, and language.

“Books, like landscapes, leave their marks in us. (…)
Certain books, though, like certain landscapes,
stay with us even when we left them,
changing not just our weathers but our climates.” 

— kenne

Another Cactus Blossom Morning   2 comments

Cactus Flower-72-2“Another Cactus Blossom Morning” — Image by kenne

Cactus Flower

We flash victory signs in the darkness, so the darkness may glitter.
— Mahmoud Darwish

As the sun sets—we set our plan into motion.
Our sole purpose to overthrow

any assumptions, to change
the course of ordinary thinking.

Our work begins by speaking to darkness
and telling darkness soon:

we will demonstrate through the secrecy of stars,

earth’s magnetic embrace
how we can be many things at once.

So much of the work we do
is internal, goes unnoticed, uncompensated.

We get written off or not written at all,
labeled freakish, prickled,
rough around the edges.

We learn to thrive
in the dry humor of soil;
carry water in our bellies
to quench our own thirst.

We survive, over again.
Adapt. Even after being
carried in the beaks of birds,
dropped elsewhere,

far from our roots, we grow.
We flourish.
And when least expected, when histories

not told by us, for us, claims we are defeated,
we gather our tears as dew.

We release our anguish,
intoxicated by our own sexed pollen.

We burst,
displaying the luscious folds of our petals.

Amir Rabiyah

Mourning Dove In The Olive Tree   Leave a comment

Mourning Dove-72Mourning Dove In The Olive Tree — Image by kenne

Goodmorning Miss Dove

I see you up in the tree

Not to mourn today.

— kenne

 

Dark In The Sunlight   1 comment

Maiden Pools Hike“Dark In The Sunlight” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

A late afternoon breeze

sunlight shines through

in the shadow

of the olive tree

telling me of the

dark in the sunlight

as the music plays

I watch you from afar

dancing on this spring day

the things I’ve held close

have moved on

as I circle

trying to get my being

out of the experience

into the movement of change

becoming dimly aware

of the moment —

whatever will be,

will be.

— kenne

 

 

 

Leaving Our Shelter In Place For A Walk   2 comments

Caliche globemallow-6405 art-72Calicle Globemallow Wildflower — Image by kenne

Beauty on my path

Walking out from my shelter

A breath of fresh air.

— kenne

Parks Are Closed, But Not The Circle   2 comments

The Circle-72Country Club Vista Circle In Tanuri Ridge — Image by kenne

Most of the residence of Tanuri Ridge are empty-nesters or retirees, However, there’s a couple in our neighborhood with two preschoolers. We are all part of our “stay-at-home” world, and the children have no idea as to what is going on. Yes, they know there’s no going daycare, no going to the park, no swimming at our community pool (their parents are former U of A swimmers, now working in the Athletic Department), and that mom and dad are at home all the time. They will grow up in a world utterly different from that that we have known. They will only know the 21st century, hopefully learning from the 20th.

 

Each day we see the two children, once on our walk, the other when their parents bring them to play on the grass on Country Club Vista Circle. For a lot of us, our real education was from the street. Well, these kids are literally learning from the street. They live at the end of Tanuri Drive, so there’s no traffic in front of their home, making the pavement a perfect place to have a classroom.

With area parks closed, once or twice a day, the family has play-time on the grassy circle, often arriving pulling the kids in a wagon. (The live about 3/4 of a mile from the circle.) This family is fortunate. It has resources making adjustments easy.

The children Joy teaches reading (Literacy Connects) are not so lucky. They are probably in the streets because their home, maybe that of a diabetic grandmother, is no place to stay for long periods. The children and adults that Literacy Connects serve will suffer the most and may never completely recover from the effects of this pandemic, even if they stay healthy.

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”

— kenne
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