Archive for the ‘Photography’ Tag

Spring Break at Sabino Creek   Leave a comment

Spring Break at Sabino Creek-1566- blog IISpring Break at Sabino Creek — Image by kenne

Children enjoy their
Spring break at Sabino creek
I turn and go back.

— kenne

An Ocotillo Morning In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Ocotillo IMG_3786 blog

Ocotillo-1595 blogOcotillo Blooming In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

Fouquieria splendens (commonly known as ocotillo American Spanish: [okoˈtiʝo], but also referred to as coachwhip, candlewood, slimwood, desert coral, Jacob’s staff, Jacob cactus, and vine cactus) is a plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States (southern Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas), and northern Mexico (as far south as Hidalgo and Guerrero).

A Tanuri Ridge Spring   Leave a comment

Tanuri Ridge Spring-3457 blogA Blooming Foothills Palo Verde In Tanuri Ridge (April 11, 2018, Tucson, Arizona) — Image by kenne

There is no glory in star or blossom till looked upon by a loving eye;
There is no fragrance in April breezes till breathed with joy as they wander by.

— William C. Bryant

Little Guy High In The Sky   1 comment

Turkey Vultures March 2013Anna’s Hummingbird, Tanuri Ridge, Arizona — Image by kenne

Little guy 
high in the sky
I know
you see me
as I pass by
darting down
near me for a
closure look
only to quickly
move on by.

— kenne

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher   Leave a comment

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher-1157 blogBlack-tailed Gnatcatcher On A Brittlebush in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Because of a lack of winter rains,
brittlebush plants are very dry and few
are blooming this spring.

— kenne

“Nothing human disgusts me . . . unless it is unkind or violent.”

— Tennesee Williams

Christmas Cholla   Leave a comment

Christmas Challo-1619 blogChristmas Cholla — Image by kenne

This plant got its name because the red fruit on the pencil-thin joints appears from November to as late as April — this one was photographed April 2. It is the smallest of cholla plants. It’s the only cholla that typically has fruit in the winter. This plant happens to be native to the Tucson basin, so it grows easily here.

— kenne

Creosote Bush Blossoms   1 comment

creosote bush-1626 blog

creosote bush-1624 blogCreosote Bush Blossoms — Images by kenne

If you have ever experienced rain in the Sonoran Desert, then you have experienced what is often referred to as the “smell of rain.” ** It is a pungent smell exhibiting a characteristic odor of creosote coming from an evergreen shrub from which its common name is derived.

This Scrub is the most drought tolerant perennial in North America, and it may be the oldest living plant. As the plant grows older, its oldest branches die, and its crown splits into separate crowns. Eventually, the old crown dies, and the new one becomes a clonal colony from the previous plant, composed of many separate stem crowns all from the same seed.

Often there are no other plants around creosote plants resulting in pure stands. The latest explanation for this is that the root systems of mature creosote plants are simply so efficient at absorbing water that fallen seeds nearby cannot accumulate enough water to germinate, effectively creating dead zones around every plant.

— kenne

** (Because we haven’t had any rain for awhile, the “smell of rain” would be welcome about now.)

 

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