Archive for the ‘Photography’ Tag

Sculpture Building In Progress   Leave a comment

Sculpture Building in Progress Near the Tanque Verde Wash — Image by kenne

I have time to photograph

they have time to create art

for trail walkers near the wash.

— kenne

Cactus Blossom Art   Leave a comment

Cactus Blossom — Photo-Artistry by kenne

The blossom opens and opens,

till it is no bigger than nature allows.

At darkness, the blossom embraces

its parts as in bed,

two sleeping lovers.

— kenne

The Yellow Rose Of Arizona   1 comment

The Yellow Rose of Arizona (Prickly Pear Blossom) — Image by kenne

May brings on a bounty of cactus blossoms, and among them is the yellow prickly pear blossom,
our “yellow rose of Arizona.”

— Kenne

Tarantula Hawk   4 comments

Tarantula Hawk Near Cienega Creek — Images by kenne

As you can see, a tarantula hawk is not a hawk, but is a spider wasp (Pompilidae) that preys on tarantulas.
Tarantula hawks belong to any of the many species in the genera Pepsis and Hemipepsis. They are one of the
largest parasitoid wasps, using their sting to paralyze their prey before dragging it to a brood nest as living
food; a single egg is laid on the prey, hatching to a larva which eats the still-living prey.
Source: Wikipedi
a

Patio Cactus Blossoms   1 comment

Patio Cactus Blossoms — Image by kenne

It may have been a bad year for wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert,

however, the cactus plants are making up for the drought. 

— kenne

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel   1 comment

Round-tailed Ground Squirrel — Images by kenne

Round-tailed ground squirrels are comparatively small animals with grayish-brown coloring that matched the
sandy soils of their environment. Their unique characteristics are, most noticeably, their long, slender, rounded
tail, and secondly, their long, wide, hairy hind feet. Their claws and their small ears positioned low on the head,
enable them to live underground in a lifestyle that is semi-fossorial. They are often mistaken for prairie dogs or
gophers, but prairie dogs are much larger and gophers do not forage above ground.
— Source: Animalia 

 

Mexican Olive Blossoms   2 comments

Mexican Olive Blossoms (Cordia boissieri) — Images by kenne

This time of year, we get up earlier 

with daylight coming earlier to begin 
our morning walk while it’s still cool 
here in the desert. Now that I’m doing less hiking, 
it’s important to get the morning walks in. 
At my age, the key some mornings is not to 
walk faster and longer; it is to aim for continuation — 
got to keep on moving.

 
We were expecting rain overnight, 
expecting my walk might be delayed. 
When it does rain, I can hear it on the skylight; 
not hearing any, I knew there was no by daylight. 
The walk took place on schedule, 
commenting to other walkers, 
“the forecast was wrong.” 
We did get some rain after breakfast, 
not enough for the rain gauge to measure.
 
— kenne

Anna’s Hummingbird   Leave a comment

Anna’s Hummingbird (Southern Arizona) — Image by kenne

The lack of bright color on the head indicates this is either a female or a young male. — kenne

The Early Bird Gets The Nectar   Leave a comment

“The Early Bird Gets the Nectar” (White-winged Dove on Saguaro Cactus Buds) — Image by kenne

In April, the budding of saguaros is followed by the return of white-winged doves from Mexico who love the nectar in
the saguaro blossoms. This image captures a white-winged dove atop buds soon to blossom — another take on
“The early bird gets the worm.”

— kenne

A Reflection Selfie   Leave a comment

A Reflection Selfie (Puerto Penasco, Mexico) — Image by kenne

I set my camera on top of the balcony wall during a stay at a resort in Puerto Penasco, April 12, 2013. — kenne

A Gila Monster Spring   Leave a comment

A Gila Monster Spring (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

Gila monsters are heavy-bodied lizards covered with beadlike scales, called osteoderms, that are black and
yellow or pink covering all but their belly. The Gila monster is venomous; its venom is made by a row of glands
in the lizard’s lower jaw. When the lizard bites, small grooves in the teeth help the venom flow into its prey. The
bite of a Gila monster is very strong, and the lizard may not loosen its grip for several seconds. It may even
chew so that the venom goes deeper into the wound. 

As the name might suggest, the Gila (pronounced HEE-la) monster has one of the worst reputations in the
reptile world. This lizard is often feared and has been described as frightful and repulsive, especially in local
folklore.
Source: San Diego Zoo

Desert Beauty — Drafting In The Moment   2 comments

Desert Beauty — Image by kenne

The drifting sands

hug and cover the cactus

showing only its light

not letting me see

its shadows embracing

my passions intensely.

— kenne

No Passage   Leave a comment

No Passage (Doubtfull Pass In Doubtfull Canyon)– Image by kenne

At one time

a stagecoach route.

Now, no passage 

without a key —

private property,

keep out,

no hunting,

call this number —

really, out in the 

middle of nowhere.

— kenne

 

Wildflowers On Esperero Trail   Leave a comment

Esperero Trail Wildflowers In Sabino Canyon (Spring 2013) — Image by kenne

What lies in the heart

of a hiker is that a

spiritual landscape exists

within the visual landscape

something fleeting in the land,

a moment when shape, color,

and movement intensify

revealing something sacred

leading to another level of reality.

— kenne

Capitol Reef National Park Panorama   Leave a comment

Capitol Reef National Park Panorama — Image by kenne

“Capitol Reef National Park is in Utah’s south-central desert. It surrounds a long wrinkle in the earth known as the Waterpocket Fold, with layers of golden sandstone, canyons and striking rock formations. Among the park’s sights are the Chimney Rock pillar, the Hickman Bridge arch, and Capitol Reef, known for its white sandstone domes. In the north are the towering monoliths of Cathedral Valley.” ― Google

“What one thinks of any region,
while traveling through,

is the result of at least three things:
what one knows,
what one imagines,
and how one is disposed.”

— Barry Lopez

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