Archive for the ‘Photography’ Tag

Pearl-Bordered Fritillary   1 comment

Aspen Loop July 2013Pearl-Bordered Fritillary Butterflies On Mt. Lemmon (07/08/13) — Image by kenne

I’m posting this Image from July 2013, because of the Bighorn Fire,
it’s not likely to see them this summer on Mt. Lemmon.

— kenne

Giant Swallowtail   Leave a comment

Pipevine Butterfly & Pool Area LinksGiant Swallowtail (Tanuri Ridge)– Image by kenne

It is not explanations that carry us forward,

it is our will to proceed.

— Paulo Coelho

 

I Saw A Hummingbird As Big As The Sky   1 comment

Anna's Hummingbird-72Anna’s Hummingbird — Image by kenne

I saw a Peacock, with a fiery tail,
I saw a Blazing Comet, drop down hail,
I saw a Cloud, with Ivy circled round,
I saw a sturdy Oak, creep on the ground,
I saw a Ant swallow up a Whale,
I saw a raging Sea, brim full of Ale,
I saw a Venice Glass, Sixteen foot deep,
I saw a well, full of mens tears that weep,
I saw their eyes, all in a flame of fire,
I saw a House, as big as the Moon and higher,
I saw the Sun, even in the midst of night,
I saw the man, that saw this wondrous sight.

— Anonymous (400 Year-Old Nonsense Poem) 

Year-Round Resident In Southern Arizona   1 comment

Empress Leilia Butterfly CollageEmpress Leilia Butterfly Collage by kenne

 

Flashback — Shenandoah Valley   Leave a comment

Shenandoah Valley-09-03-06Shenandoah Valley, September 3, 2006 — Image by kenne

 

Posted June 25, 2020 by kenneturner in Information, Panorama, Photography

Tagged with , ,

Western Kingbird   1 comment

Western Kingbird-72Western Kingbird — Image by kenne

 

The Santa Catalinas Are Covered In Smoke   1 comment

Ventana Canyon Smoke-2-72Smoke covers the Catalinas today. With the use of Photoshop and a Dehaze filter,
I created this less smokey image. — kenne

Under androgynous sky
Sun or moon
Father or mother

The camera never lies
But the photographer
Knows how to fib

— Patrick Jennings 

(The Bighorn Fire remains only 19% contained.)

Bighorn Fire In Ventana Canyon   6 comments

Ventana Canyon Fire-2-72Ventana Canyon is where we first hiked in the Catalinas in ten years ago.
Since then, I’ve hiked the trail into the canyon a least twice a year.
This image was taken last night (June 19, 2020).

Bighorn Fire-Ventana-2-72This image is what it looked like this morning. Before dawn, you could still see the fireline.

Bighorn Fire-Ventana-72I decided to drive up Craycroft Road to get a closer look. As the sun got higher in the east
I was able to get this image. It’s a good thing I had a mask, the smoke and smell were pronounced.
(Because of COVID-19, the county has mandated everyone wear a mask in public.)
— Images by kenne

American Robin   Leave a comment

American Robin On Mt. Lemmon — Image by kenne

Though they’re familiar town and city birds, American Robins are at
home in wilder areas, too, including mountain forests.

Whispering Clouds   1 comment

Whispers of Color-08-01-11-72Whispering Clouds — Image by kenne

Whispering clouds in

parallel

across the mountains,

listen and

you will hear

night approaching

pulling down

nature’s shade

over the shy

as the mountains

begin to glow

in a dark blue

against

the evening sky.

— kenne

Arizona Dock   Leave a comment

Bitter dock (1 of 2)-72Arizona Dock (rumex hymenosepalus) — Image by kenne

The reddish-pink inflorescence of rumex, Arizona Dock, also called Wild Rhubarb, consists of elongated clusters of many dozen small flowers, each formed of small sepals about half an inch long. 

Wild rhubarb was once cultivated in the southwestern United States for the roots, a good source of tannin, used for tanning leather. The roots also yield a warm, medium brown dye for natural fibers like wool and cotton. But when it comes to savoring – the leaves and leaf stalks are considered edible when young. Use leaves and tender young stems in salads or cook like spinach. Older shoots can be cooked and eaten like rhubarb, e.g., rhubarb pie. 

— kenne

“If You Fly, We Can’t!”   2 comments

Bighorn Fire-72Smoke from the Bighorn Wildfire in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, Santa Catalina Mountains (June 9, 2020) — Image by kenne 

Yesterday, for the second time since June 5th, a drone was observed over
the Bighorn Fire’s southern perimeter. This unlawful event forced
the aircraft suppression effort to be halted, endangering the lives
of on the ground firefighters and the aircrews at a critical time
during the height of the burning period. 

Incident Commander Lathe Evans explained that the percentage of containment
has not increased, and acreage burned has increased largely due to this
illegal drone incursion.

If You Fly, We Can’t!

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