Archive for the ‘Texas’ Category

On The Road: Somewhere In West Texas   2 comments

On The Road: Somewhere In West Texas — Image by kenne

many miles from home
on the road in west Texas
our August road trip

— kenne

Houston Skyline Viewed From Buffalo Bayou Park   Leave a comment

Houston Skyline Viewed From Buffalo Bayou Park (August 26, 2021) — Image by kenne

We are now nearing the final leg of our road trip that began on August 7th. We have been in many states from
Arizona
to Maine and have taken hundreds of photos, many of which will later appear on this blog with my
observations.
We are now in Houston, our previous home, before moving to Tucson eleven years ago, visiting family and friends. 
On Thursday of this week, we had lunch at Birraporetti’s, an upscale and lavish Italian restaurant/Irish bar in
the
theater/business district for over 30 years. Because of the pandemic and especially the recent virus spike
in
the Houston area, there were only two other customers in this large eatery/bar. 
This was not surprising, however very sad.

— kenne

 

Nowhere Else But Texas   2 comments

“Nowhere Else But Texas” (August 9, 2021 Somewhere in North Texas) — Image by kenne

It has always been my understanding that no flag flies at the same level as the American. But maybe I have had it wrong.

— kenne

On The Road–Sundance Square   2 comments

Our second night on the road was spent in Ft. Worth. Before going to our hotel, we spent some time in Sundance Square,
located downtown Ft. Worth.

Sundance Square (August 8, 2021) — Photo Essay by kenne

On The Road: Bush Family Home In Midland, Texas   1 comment

Joy reading the historical on George W. Bush’s childhood home in Midland, Texas — Day Two.

George Bush Family Home

Bush Family Home In Midland, Texas (August 8, 2021)– Images by kenne

Sunflower Ally   Leave a comment

A Sunflower Ally in the Texas Sandhills State Park (August 8, 2021) — Image by kenne

Texas Sandhills State Park   1 comment

One of our stops in Texas after leaving Pecos was the the Texas Sandhills State Park. Here are a few images from our brief stay in the park.
— Images by kenne

Texas Sandhills State Park

Texas Sandhills State Park

Texas Sandhills State Park

Texas Sandhills State Park

Texas Sandhills State Park

Texas Two Step   Leave a comment

Texas Two Step — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“He had a habit of remarking to bartenders that he didn’t see
any sense in mixing whiskey with water
since the whiskey was already wet.”

— Joseph Mitchell

Houston’s Shakespeare Pub   Leave a comment

Texas Johnny Brown at Houston’s Shakespeare Pub — Photo-Artistry by kenne 
(Click on Texas Johnny Brown to see archived blog posting on TJB)

Texas Johnny Brown is a major talent who simmered on the blues scene longer than all the beef stew cooked in the ’40s, the decade when he first began playing and recording. Like pianist Johnny Johnson of St. Louis, Brown is an artist who did not get a chance to record a full album as a leader until he had been in the music business more than half-a-century. Also like Johnson, the results of coming in so late in the game have been a pair of highly acclaimed, prize-winning albums including the righteous Blues Defender. Brown can take plenty of the credit, since he has taken over almost complete control of his ow arranging, production, and mixing, as well as the string bending and blues moaning. He began his career as a sideman for the Duke and Peacock outfits in the ’50s about which discographers make comments such as “… the record keeping at that time was less than desirable.” As a result, some of Brown’s playing on releases by artists such as Lightnin’ Hopkins and Joe Hinton remains uncredited. The guitarist, singer, and songwriter began his professional career as an original member of the great Amos Milburn band known as the Aladdin Chickenshackers. Brown’s picking is killer on early Aladdin recordings by both Milburn, and on Ruth Brown’s first Atlantic sides. Atlantic allowed Brown to make a few recordings of his own in 1949, buoyed by the enthusiasm the label had for Milburn, who played behind his sideman on these sessions along with the rest of the Aladdin Chickenshackers. T-Bone Walker is the dominating force in Brown’s stylistic palette, an influence that was considered something of a driving permit for any guitarist venturing out of Houston during this period. Before finally getting the biggie recording opportunities in the late ’90s, Brown did an ARC session in Houston in the early ’50s that was never released. He also performed regularly with Junior Parker during that decade, remaining based out of Houston. As a songwriter, Brown’s most famous work is “Two Steps from the Blues,” a big hit for Bobby “Blue” Bland, with whom he also toured as a lead guitarist in the ’50s and ’60s. By the ’80s, he was considered only sporadically active on the blues scene, but this turned out to be only a temporary brown-out, so to speak.

— Eugene Chadbourne Source: allmusic.com

West Texas   2 comments

West Texas — Photo-Artistry by kenne

I want to dance on your planes,
Twirl in the rain,
And let the drops fall between my lips like the crevices of your canyons,
Brought to life when you are,
Slumber when you do,
Live each day as you live,
My sweet West Texas.

— from West Texas by Emily Miller

A Fishing Moment   4 comments

A Fishing Moment — Image by kenne

The Angler’s Song

From the river’s plashy bank,
Where the sedge grows green and rank,
And the twisted woodbine springs,
Upward speeds the morning lark
To its silver cloud — and hark!
On his way the woodman sings.

On the dim and misty lakes
Gloriously the morning breaks,
And the eagle’s on his cloud: —
Whilst the wind, with sighing, wooes
To its arms the chaste cold ooze,
And the rustling reeds pipe loud.

Where the embracing ivy holds
Close the hoar elm in its folds,
In the meadow’s fenny land,
And the winding river sweeps
Through its shallows and still deeps, —
Silent with my rod I stand.

But when sultry suns are high
Underneath the oak I lie
As it shades the water’s edge,
And I mark my line, away
In the wheeling eddy, play,
Tangling with the river sedge.

When the eye of evening looks
On green woods and winding brooks,
And the wind sighs o’er the lea, —
Woods and streams, — I leave you then,
While the shadow in the glen
Lengthens by the greenwood tree.

— Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Sunday Afternoon At Gruene Hall   1 comment

Sunday Afternoon At Gruene Hall — Photo-Artistry by kenne

‘The Place’ 

Gruene Hall took on the mantel 
‘Texas’s Oldest Dance Hall’
after Hurricane Katina destroyed
the Double Bayou Dance Hall in 2007

locally called ‘The Place’ for 65 years —
there was blues in this place
music by the people for the poor
served up with beer and bar-b-q

— kenne

Double Bayou Dance Hall (‘The Place’)

Jamming In East Texas   Leave a comment

Blues Musicians Jamming In East Texas — Image by kenne

Texas musicians

downhome in the piney woods

living out the blues

— kenne

I Think So   1 comment

Kenne & Kate-03-30-05-2-Edit-1-art-72Dad and Daughter (03/30/05) — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Our human condition makes us tend to share

only the best of ourselves,

because we are always searching

for love and approval.

— Paulo Coelho

 

“The More It Stays The Same.”   3 comments

Old Jules-artJack “Old Jules” Purcell — Photo-Artistry by kenne

In June of 2006 Old Jules wrote on his blog So Far From Heaven “The More It Stays The Same.”

I hadn’t watched Easy Rider (Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper and Jack Nicholson, circa 1968) in three decades.

When I saw it again this past weekend I appreciated it again for the first time:

Nicholson: You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can’t understand what’s gone wrong with it.

Hopper: Huh. Man, everybody got chicken, that’s what happened, man. Hey, we can’t even get into like, uh, second-rate hotel, I mean, a second-rate motel. You dig? They think we’re gonna cut their throat or something, man. They’re scared, man.

Nicholson: Oh, they’re not scared of you. They’re scared of what you represent to ’em.

Hopper: Hey man. All we represent to them, man, is somebody needs a haircut.

Nicholson: Oh no. What you represent to them is freedom.

Hopper: What the hell’s wrong with freedom, man? That’s what it’s all about.

Nicholson: Oh yeah, that’s right, that’s what it’s all about, all right. But talkin’ about it and bein’ it – that’s two different things.

I mean, it’s real hard to be free when you are bought and sold in the marketplace.

‘Course, don’t ever tell anybody that they’re not free ’cause then they’re gonna get real busy killin’ and maimin’ to prove to you that they are.

Oh yeah, they’re gonna talk to you, and talk to you, and talk to you about individual freedom, but they see a free individual, it’s gonna scare ’em.

Hopper: Mmmm, well, that don’t make ’em runnin’ scared.

Nicholson: No, it makes ’em dangerous.

Three young men searching for America who found it wasn’t what they bargained for.

Jack

%d bloggers like this: