Archive for the ‘The Woodlands Texas’ Tag

A Solstice Night   Leave a comment

Yard Photos Dec 2009Winter Solstice (December 19, 2009, The Woodlands, Texas) — Computer Art by kenne

A solstice night
in the dead of winter,
strategically placed lighting
on the courtyard wall.

Dark shadows imprinted
beyond the naked trees,
in this gloomy season of mists,
concealing signs of winter’s damage,

where only ghosts abound.
Tomorrow morning

the low sun starts
a minute-by-minute journey back,

not behind, but within
it’s new spring companion.
But for now,
nature remains soulfully raw.

— kenne

Upper Sabino Canyon Panorama   3 comments

Sabino Canyon Panorama- blogPanorama of Sabino Canyon Taken From Tram Road Near Stop 9 (February 16, 2010) — Image by kenne

At the time I took this panorama I had no idea the role this beautiful canyon would play in my life for the next seven years. In February of 2010, we drove to Tucson to explore our making a move from The Woodlands Texas to Tucson. Now the rest is history. (Flickr Album)

— kenne

Remembering Hurricane Ike Nine Years Out   Leave a comment

Hurrican Ike Gulf CoastGalveston Beach Front Devastation (September 13, 2008) –Source: http://strangecosmos.com/

Water’s Rising

water’s rising, and you who were caught
in last year’s flood, you are ready to scramble
onto the roof of the car and scream

but on this lonely backstreet, with a good
meal still warm in my belly and the wine
still sweet in my mouth, there are no lights

there is no cell phone, no traffic
no friendly strangers out for a stroll —
there is only the dark, and the current

— Bryce Milligan

IkeLake Woodlands Drive, The Woodlands, Texas (September 13, 2008)

James and grandma-3695-blogBorn in the Eye of the Storm

A storm in the Gulf
Satellite views as big as Texas
On track for Galveston
Strong winds of medium strength
Pushing a wall of seawater

People boarding up windows
Placing valuables in cars
Preparing to run from the storm
Others preparing to shelter-in-place,
Hoping the storm will turn away

Outer bands begin coming ashore
Bringing water from the sky and the Gulf
Providing a taste of things to come
As cars head north, one is headed south
With baby to be born

Arriving at the Medical Center
The delivery process begins
Outside the winds gain strength
Choreographed with mother’s labor
Moving toward a crescendo of life

 Suddenly, there is peace and calm
As a baby is born in the eye of the storm
A prince of strength – symbol of the storm
A prince of peace – symbol of the eye
Forever in the eye of the storm.

kenne (Written for James, September 9, 2009)

Our Zen Fountain — July 11, 2008   5 comments

(First Posted July 11, 2008)Zen Fountain

 

The Water Flows

It’s hard for me to believe that it was six weeks ago
when I ordered the materials and began the preliminary
preparation for a fountain in our backyard.
There are many reasons why so long,
not the least of which was the delayed delivery of
the fountain pedestal, which finally can in yesterday.  

By working with nature, you can look into your own nature.

“The secret of life is enjoying
the passage of time
Any fool can do it”

kenne

(Project Photos)

Images by kenne


“Everybody is ‘you’. Everybody is ‘I’. That’s our name. We all share that.”

— Alan Watts

Red Hot Blues   Leave a comment

Red Hot Blues DSC_0696 blogRed Hot Blues — Computer Art by kenne

When I think “Red Hot Blues,” I think Stevie Ray Vaughn. We were able to see him at The Woodlands Pavilion in the summer of 1990, less than a month before he died in a helicopter crash in southern Wisconsin in route to Chicago. Stevie was the “Prince of the Blues.”

— kenne

 

 

Remembering Mother, Agnes — Mother’s Day, 2017   1 comment

motherchristmaslucus03-12-21-31-blog-iiMother, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Agnes. 

(The following was originally written and posted September 5, 2012.)

Willie Agnes Poe passed away (September 8, 2006) after three months fighting post-surgery infection. During the last few weeks of Mother’s life, she shared stories of her childhood and often talked about playing with her close childhood friend, Fern.  (They remained close throughout life.)

“We had so much fun playing in the cemetery — Can you take me back to the cemetery on the hill?’ she would ask.  “I can see the man in black with a big black dog,” she would go on.

In her last days, the man in black visited her.  As we were talking, she looked straight ahead, “…see him, he is here!  Don’t you see him?”  Then she would turn and ask, “Can you bring me a big black dog?  I want a big dog!  Can you get one for me?”

“Yes, we can,” would be my reply,  We were making arrangements for Jill to bring one of their black labs by for Mother, just two days before she passed on.

On August 26, 2012, the family gathered in The Woodlands to celebrate the life of Willie Agnes Poe, which involved a brunch at Cru’ Wine Bar and a gathering at the pedestrian bridge over Grogan’s Mill Road.

After moving to The Woodlands in the mid-1980’s, Mother would walk the trails from her Grogan’s Landing apartment, which included the pedestrian bridge in a six-mile walk around the TPC golf course. Over time, Mother became functionally blind, limiting the trail walking, but not her walking. Early each morning she would spend a couple of hours walking back and forth over the pedestrian bridge. Our gathering at the bridge ended with a symbolic walk over Agnes’ bridge.

Why this celebration now? Because Mother had donated her body to the Texas Medical Center after her death, we didn’t have a family gathering to celebrate her life. It was our understanding that Mother’s ashes would be sent to us 2-3 years after her death. As it turned out, we didn’t receive her ashes till this past May.

alabama2006-11-13-45-hall-cemetery-blogHall Cemetary

Several months after Mother’s death we got word that her brother, J.C. had died.  I knew immediately we were going to Alabama.   How I know just how important it was to bring closure on the Mother’s life. While in Alabama, Joy and I made a point of going to Lincoln, then two miles out to the country church and cemetery in Refuge.  She was always at her happiest when talking about her childhood in Alabama, even more so during her last days with us.  She always wanted to go back but knew she would only be able to in her vision of those childhood memories. It doesn’t go unnoted that with the importance of Hall Cemetery in Refuge, Alabama, Mother didn’t desire to be buried there. For her, a higher priority was to give her body to medicine.

While visiting Hall Cemetery, I wanted so to turn around and see two little girls playing in the cemetery on the hill – to see the man in black with the big dog – to hear the laughing, and see the joy when the big dog came running to the children.  Instead, Joy and I walked silently, on this sunny fall morning through the small cemetery on the hill, which now represents the burial-place of the last surviving member of the Confederate army. As fate would have it, as we walked through Hall Cemetery, a black dog appeared.

By making the journey to Hall Cemetery, I have for my life captured the feeling of two little girls laughing and playing in a world that never vanished from Mother’s vision of happiness.  Real or not, it was real for her – now it is real for me, and I might add, Joy.

kenne

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A Celebration Of Life

“When the child was a child, it didn’t know
It was a child
Everything for it was filled with life and all life was one
When the child, when the child
The child, child, child, child, child
And on and on and on and on, etc. And onward
With a sense of wonder
Upon the highest hill. Upon the highest hill
When the child was a child
Are you there
Shassas, shassas
Up on a highest hill
When the child was a child, was a child, was a child
Was a child, was a child, was a child, etc.
… and it’s still quivering there today”

 —from, Song of Being A Child. Music by Van Morrison, Words by Peter Handke

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A Little Bit Of the Gulf Coast In The Desert   Leave a comment

azaleas-0425-blogPotted Azaleas On Our Tucson Patio — Image by kenne

The azaleas in spring,
Are a beautiful thing.
Shades of purple, red and white,
Oh, what a glorious sight.

— from “Azaleas In the Spring,” by J.B. LeBuert

Having lived over 25 years in the Houston, Texas area one of the things we miss are azaleas blooming in the spring time. Here in the desert, our little plant began to bloom a month ago. 

— kenne

 

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