Archive for the ‘Sonoran Desert’ Tag

An Ocotillo Morning In Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Ocotillo IMG_3786 blog

Ocotillo-1595 blogOcotillo Blooming In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

Fouquieria splendens (commonly known as ocotillo American Spanish: [okoˈtiʝo], but also referred to as coachwhip, candlewood, slimwood, desert coral, Jacob’s staff, Jacob cactus, and vine cactus) is a plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States (southern Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas), and northern Mexico (as far south as Hidalgo and Guerrero).

Ocotillo Sun   Leave a comment

Ocotillo (1 of 1) Art blogOcotillo Sun — Digital Art by kenne

The ocotillos
are in bloom
all over the desert,
their red flame
lost only when
inline with the sun.

— kenne

Creosote Bush Blossoms   1 comment

creosote bush-1626 blog

creosote bush-1624 blogCreosote Bush Blossoms — Images by kenne

If you have ever experienced rain in the Sonoran Desert, then you have experienced what is often referred to as the “smell of rain.” ** It is a pungent smell exhibiting a characteristic odor of creosote coming from an evergreen shrub from which its common name is derived.

This Scrub is the most drought tolerant perennial in North America, and it may be the oldest living plant. As the plant grows older, its oldest branches die, and its crown splits into separate crowns. Eventually, the old crown dies, and the new one becomes a clonal colony from the previous plant, composed of many separate stem crowns all from the same seed.

Often there are no other plants around creosote plants resulting in pure stands. The latest explanation for this is that the root systems of mature creosote plants are simply so efficient at absorbing water that fallen seeds nearby cannot accumulate enough water to germinate, effectively creating dead zones around every plant.

— kenne

** (Because we haven’t had any rain for awhile, the “smell of rain” would be welcome about now.)

 

Fairy Duster   2 comments

Fariy Duster-1620 blog

Fairy Duster DSC_1520 blog

Fairy Duster-1617 blogFairy Duster (Calliandra eriophylla) — Images by kenne

This perennial is one of the first blooming plants in the Sonoran Desert. These scrubs love hot and dry climates, so the Sonoran Desert is perfect for them.

— kenne

 

Cold Blooded and Warm Blooded Animals Are On The Move   2 comments

Desert Spinny Lizard-1661 blogDesert Spiny Lizard in the Saguaro National Park (April 2, 2018) — Image by kenne

Most days here in the Sonoran Desert are averaging in the 80’s causing reptiles to be on the move and our “snowbird” friends to start packing for their journey north. 

With morning lows around 50 degrees, this Desert Spiny (Sceloporus magister) was more interested in sunning than our nearby presence. This native of the Sonoran Desert is a large (up to about 142 mm or 5.6″ from snout to vent), stocky lizard with large, pointed, keeled, overlapping scales. The Desert Spiny can live up to six years, which explains the one that has been a patio friend for several years now, which I visit with each day. 

— kenne

 

Out Of The Darkness, Into The Sunshine   1 comment

lupin (1 of 1) blogDesert Lupine — Image by kenne

Out of the darkness
Signs of spring begin to rise — 
Liberated, free.

Poppy (1 of 1)-Recovered blog

Now I see poppies
Brightening the desert fields — 
Now I’m satisfied.

— kenne

Saguaros At Sunrise   Leave a comment

MMM 02-04-13Saguaros At Sunrise — Image by kenne

The Capture of Mr. Sun

The sun is a lion
     circling his cage,
Caught for you, brought for you
     on this wheeled stage,
Through fixed bars glaring
     his wrath and his rage
Like a pen for the baby
     or bedrails in old age.

The lion is a sunflower
     with a broad gold face,
Its petals outstreaming
     like a mane or the rays
Of that candescent Power
    we all watch pace
Through the gendering heavens
    on its circuit of days.

The flower is tracing
     the sun on its rounds;
The carnival moves through
     its orbit of towns;
The lion's cage rolls
     your streets up and down
Where be pads and we shiver
     at his smile, his frown.

-- W. D. Snodgrass

 

 

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