Archive for the ‘Southeast Arizona’ Category

Two-Tailed Swallowtail Butterfly   Leave a comment

Two-tailed Swallowtail-72Two-Tailed Swallowtail Butterfly — Image by kenne

Beauty and size make the two-tailed swallowtail butterfly (Papilio multicaudata)  an impressive specimen with a nearly five-inch wingspan and a body that approaches two inches in length. So impressive that is was designated the Arizona state butterfly in 2001.

Near the top of the yellow wings are 4 markings of almost parallel black lines. The posterior portion of the wings holds blue dots surrounded by black markings that curve to form a “w” shape when the wings are open. Below these dots are more rectangular shaped orange bars emblazoned into the dark outline of the wing.

Sandhill Crane   Leave a comment

Whitewater Draw January 2014-9552-Sandhill Crane-72Sandhill Crane (Whitewater Draw) — Image by kenne

Sandhill Cranes Landing At Whitewater Draw   Leave a comment

Whitewater Draw January 2014-961772-72Sandhill Cranes Landing At Whitewater Draw — Image by kenne

Gliding into land

Neck and legs sticking way out

What natural grace.

— kenne

Cadillac Desert   Leave a comment

“If surface water can be compared with interest income,
and non-renewable groundwater with capital,
then much of the West was living mainly on interest income.”

Marc Reisner

Peloncillo Mountains“Fenceline” — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Fenceline

lost in its
harsh beauty
we walk the fence line
drawn to the
once riparian land
on the other side

fences cannot hide
the splendor
nor the disgrace
now tattooed
across a fragile land
abused and neglected
by cultures past
and present

a place where
water once stood
now disappearing
to caverns below
playing hide ‘n seek
from pipes sucking
their very subsistence
on to nearby pecan groves

not learning to share
we fight for water
destroying the source
leaving behind death
only to cycle back
after all is gone

a lone jackrabbit
runs ahead of us
darting from
bush to bush
seeking to outlast
the hand of death
pulling at us
urging us to follow

— kenne 

Cream Cup Wildflower   Leave a comment

Creamcups wildflowers-1-of-1-7-blog-3Cream Cup Wildflower (Platystemon californicus) — Image by kenne

This lovely wildflower often grows in the moist, sandy ground at the edges of desert washes.
These flowers are partly wind-pollinated and partly pollinated by solitary bees.

— kenne

Hiking The Pistol Hill Trail   1 comment

pistol hill hike-3-72Hiking The Pistol Hill Trail (January 11, 2019) — Panorama by kenne

Images by kenne

“A clear attentive mind
Has No meaning but that
Which sees is truly seen.”

— from Plute Creek by Gary Snyder

Sandhill Cranes at Whitewater Draw   Leave a comment

Sandhill Cranes at Whitewater Draw-Edit-2-blogSandhill Cranes at Whitewater Draw — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Sandhill Cranes wintering in southeast Arizona and northern Sonora many have migrated from their nesting area in Siberia. 

Whitewater Draw is an Arizona Game and Fish Wildlife Area is of state and regional significance as the primary wintering area for Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in Arizona and includes both the Lesser (most numerous) and Greater subspecies. Located in the southern Sulphur Springs Valley, cranes are coming from both the Rocky Mountain population and Mid-Continental population. The area also supports wintering Snow Geese (80-200) and a few Ross?s Geese (occasional to 40). Counts of Sandhill Cranes in early January have steadily climbed from 4,000 in 1991 to over 22,000 in 2008 at Whitewater Draw, with another 13,000 present 36 miles north in the Willcox Playa area, and another 600 present in the far north of Sulphur Springs Valley at Bonita, AZ, and 400 present in the Safford Valley near Duncan. The Greater subspecies breeds in the northern states of the continental U.S., and the Lesser subspecies, breeds from Alaska and eastern Siberia. (Source: Audubon.org)

Every year the town of Wilcox hosts Wings Over Wilcox — Birding and Nature Festival (January 17-20, 2019). Birds have been arriving for weeks now — the birds have their own schedule.

— kenne

Don’t Fence Me In   2 comments

Cattle Fenceline-Edit-1-art-2-blog.jpgDon’t Fence Me In — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Questionable deals
A cattle trucking corral
Ranchers bow to greed.

— kenne

Swimming Through Currents Of Air   3 comments

Sandhill Crain-air to water-art-blogSwimming Through Currents Of Air — Photo-Artistry by kenne

With each move
the currents swell
in multiple directions
moving all at once
taking a new shape
becoming real.

— kenne

The Village of Elgin, Wine, Beer and Whiskey   Leave a comment

The Village of Elgin Wine Tasting Room — Images by kenne

Late morning
Driving scenic
HWY 83
To southern
Arizona
Wine country
Fast adding
Craft beer
And whiskey
In Elgin,
Population 180.
Not our first time
Driving down
From Tucson
To to sample
The award
Winning
Wine,
Beer and
Spirits
While enjoying
The rolling slopes
Of the high desert
At the base of the
Santa Rita and
Empire Mountains.

— kenne

Today — Bee On Desert Marigold   4 comments

Desert Marigold blogBee On Desert Marigold — Image by kenne

Today

If ever there were a spring day so perfect,
so uplifted by a warm intermittent breeze

that in made you want to throw
open all the windows in the house

and unlatch the door to the canary’s cage,
indeed, rip the little door from the jamb,

a day when the cool brick paths
and the garden sprouting tulips

seemed so etched in sunlight
that you felt like taking

a hammer to the glass paperweight
on the living room end table,

releasing the inhabitants
from their snow-covered cottage

so they could walk out,
holding hands and squinting

into this larger dome of blue and white,
well, today is just that kind of day.

— Billy Collins

Tubac Hawk Watch   Leave a comment

This is the time of year to witness migrating birds passing through the southeastern Arizona area. Among them is the common black hawk.

Tubac Hawk Watch-1355 blog

Tubac Hawk Watch-1342Even without the “big gun” lens some of my raptor photographer friends have, I have wanted to go to the Tubac Hawk Watch, which I was able to do this past Tuesday with Bill Kaufman.

I expected to be outgunned, by not having anything over 300+ mm lens, I still gave it my best shot.

Bill and I arrived about 8:15 am at the Ron Morriss Park in Tubac. Most of the birds of prey usually start taking flight between 9:00 am and noon, so we were surprised when some started coming out of the tree-line to the east minutes after we had arrived.

“Black Hawk Up”! “Black Hawk Up”! Became the cry as birders pointed cameras and binoculars to the sky.

Knowing that such a flight pattern near the tree-line would be good for me and my lesser lens (28-300 mm), I had already moved to a position near the tree-line. Even so, my images don’t begin to match up to the more powerful lenses.

Here’s one of my images, followed by one Bill Kaufman took.

Common Black Hawk-1287 blogImage by kenne

Common Black Hawk_Tubac Hawk Watch-20180313_0018_bImage by Bill Kaufman

 

 

Tubac Hawk Watch-1351 blogNed Harris, seated in the middle,
is my Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist mentor
and excellent raptor photographer.
Several of his photos are in Pete Dunne’s book, Birds of Prey.”

Tubac Hawk Watch-1353 blogBill Kaufman is second from the left.

untitled-1350.jpgImages by kenne

To force the pace and never to be still
Is not the way of those who study birds
Or women. The best poets wait for words.
The hunt is not an exercise of will
But patient love relaxing on a hill
To note the movement of a timid wing;
Until the one who knows that she is loved
No longer waits but risks surrendering –
In this the poet finds his moral proved
Who never spoke before his spirit moved.

— from “Poet, Lover, Birdwatcher” by Nissim Ezekiel

 

 

%d bloggers like this: