Archive for the ‘Mourning Doves’ Tag

Mourning Doves In The Morning Sunlight   1 comment

Mourning Doves-72Mourning Doves In The Morning Sunlight (Sabino Canyon Recreational Area) — Image by kenne

“For most of us, there is only the unattended
Moment, the moment in and out of time,
The distraction fit, lost in a shaft of sunlight,
The wild thyme unseen, or the winter lightning
Or the waterfall, or music heard so deeply
That it is not heard at all, but you are the music
While the music lasts.”

— from Four Quartets, by T. S. Eliot

Mourning Dove In Nest   3 comments

Mourning Dove Image by kenne

Mourning Doves are primarily a bird of open country, scattered trees, and woodland edges, but large numbers roost in woodlots during winter. They feed on the ground in grasslands, agricultural fields, backyards, and roadsides.

They typically nest amid dense foliage on the branch of an evergreen, orchard tree, mesquite, cottonwood, or vine.  Unbothered by nesting around humans, Mourning Doves may even nest on gutters, eaves, light fixtures or abandoned equipment.

The male will bring nesting material to the female. She generally builds a very flimsy nest with no insulation. This one is atop a light fixture right outside our door.

— kenne

Doves Bathing In Patio Water Fountain   Leave a comment

Mourning Doves Bathing In Patio Water Fountain (October 16, 2016) — Images by kenne

Mourning doves bathing
Children of stone pour water
For more than drinking.

— kenne

A Pair Of Doves Nesting In The Rafters   2 comments

A pair of mourning doves have built a nest in the community center rafters. Since nesting doves are easily bothered, causing them to abandon

 the nest, this location over the pool entrance seems a little unusual. However, I’m told that this general location has been used for years.

The female will build the nest from twigs, weeds and leaves gathered by the male. LIke this one, most nests are flimsy structures.
Each taking turns on the nest . . .

. . . while the other stands guard. There are usually two eggs in the nest, with the fledging appearing in about two weeks. Look for a nesting update.
— Images by kenne

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