Archive for the ‘Southeast Arizona’ Tag

Arizona Wine Country   Leave a comment

James & FamilyArizona Wine Country — Computer Art by kenne

Vineyards grace grasslands
Surrounded by rolling hills —
Wines and copper mines.

— kenne

The Outpost   Leave a comment

Don't Fence Me In B&W- blog“The Outpost” (Doubtful Canyon Cattle Ranch) — Image by kenne

Various Outposts

You traded places
with the mystery — fire-torn, insulated leaves,
the steady eyes of the huckleberry —   (Haven’t you

been sad most of your life? Come on, 
all those outposts in the middle . . . they say the end
of growth is that you’ll suffer “purely” . . .)

One night, remember? No envy or hope.
What you sought
was here, what was done

could not be undone by you: there was the owl,
the night’s vice president,
the tangled sheets of moon —

— Brenda Hillman

Don’t Fence Me In   1 comment

Don't Fence Me In-B&W blogDon’t Fence Me In — Image by kenne

the West
invented itself,

then
reinvented itself — 

first by cowboys,
then
by landowners,

which changed its
tone and image,

so much so
 now only the
makings of myths,

not history.

— kenne 

 

Coyote Fence — Computer Painting   Leave a comment

Doubtful Canyon Weekend Dec 2012Computer Painting by kenne

You ask me what’s a coyote fence? A crooked line of cedar poles
Surrounding our adobe, our refuge from the road
Some nights we can see light of fires as Indians dance
And the eyes of God shine through the coyote fence.

— from “The Light Beyond the Coyote Fence” by Tom Russell

Cochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains   1 comment

Cochise StrongholdCochise Stronghold In The Dragoon Mountains — Panorama by kenne

This rugged natural fortress was, for some 15 years, the home and base of operations for the famed Chiricahua Apache Chief, Cochise.  Cochise and about 1,000 of his followers, of whom some 250 were warriors, located here.

Born in present-day Arizona, Cochise led the Chiricahua band of the Apache tribe during a period of violent social upheaval. In 1850, the United States took control over the territory that today comprises Arizona and New Mexico.  Not hostile to the whites at first, he kept peace with the Anglo-Americans until 1861, when he became their implacable foe because of the blunder of a young U.S. Army officer, Lt. George Bascom.   In that year, Cochise and several of his relatives had gone to an encampment of soldiers in order to deny the accusation that they had abducted a child from a ranch. The boy was later proved to have been kidnapped by another band of Apaches.

During the parley, Cochise and his followers were ordered held as hostages by Bascom, but Cochise managed to escape almost immediately by cutting a hole in a tent. Bascom later ordered the other Apache hostages hanged, and the embittered Cochise joined forces with Mangas Coloradas, his father-in-law, in a guerrilla struggle against the American army and settlers. The capture and murder of Mangas Coloradas in 1863 left Cochise as the Apache war chief.   The U.S. Army captured him in 1871 and prepared to transfer the Chiricahua to a reservation hundreds of miles away, but he escaped again and renewed the resistance campaign. The following year after negotiating a new treaty with the help of Thomas Jeffords, the band was allowed to stay in their homeland.

— Source: Coronado National Forest

Desert Ranch   Leave a comment

Peloncillo MountainsDesert Ranch — Black & White Computer Art

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

— Edmund Burke

Cochise Stronghold Panoramas   2 comments

Cochise Stronghold

 

Cochise Stronghold

 

Cochise Stronghold

 

Cochise Stronghold

Cochise Stronghold Panoramas — Images by kenne

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