Archive for the ‘Bunkhouse’ Tag

Bunkhouse Alone The De Anza Trail Between Tubac and Tumacacori   4 comments

Bunkhouse Window-9519 blog

Bunkhouse Window-9518

Bunkhouse Boots-9517

Bunkhouse Boots-9515 blog

Bunkhouse-9513 blogBunkhouse Alone The De Anza Trail Between Tubac and Tumacacori  in Southern Arizona– Images by kenne

Almost A Line of Poetry

Winter’s trees place shadows on the walls.

Leaves pepper the dirt floors

Below broken rafters open to the sky.

Windows and doors missing from their opening.

An old canning jar, hot-pot and boots

Placed in open window, not by chance.

Someone arranged them —

Almost a line of poetry.

— kenne

An Old Bunk House In The San Simon Valley   5 comments

An Old Bunkhouse Near An Abandoned San Simon Valley Livestock Corral — Images by kenne

In the late eighteen hundreds, the land west of the Peloncillo Mountains, known as the San Simon Valley, had many beautiful grassy meadows with mesquite, ironwood, palo verde and other desert trees. This area was very attractive to many west Texas ranchers and by 1895 an estimated 50,000 head of cattle were grazing in the San Simon Valley. However, under the old open range conditions the great herds were devastating the San Simon Valley. Today most of the valuable grasses and forage plants are gone, left behind are many deep trails first worn by cattle, later dug deep by storm waters, easily eroding the land no longer protected by fine stock grasses. 

The destruction to the valley is not an isolated picture, but serves as a poster-child for similar areas in the west that are experiencing the same destructive process in much of the western U.S. 

This weekend we will be spending additional time in the valley and the Peloncillo Mountains photographing more evidence of the southwest’s disappearing water.

kenne

Abandoned Livestock Corral In The San Simon Valley — Image by kenne

Old Ranch Bunkhouse Along The De Anza Trail   14 comments

Bunkhouse Windows — Images by kenne

Hidden

Under a thick mesquite bosque,

A barbwire fence

Separates 

The historic Juan Bautista de Anza trail

From an old

Abandoned building,

Whose cracked adobe walls

And collapsing roof

Provide sunlight and shadow 

Through yawning windows

On individual items

Of cowboys past —

Enduring whispers

From a permanent

Desert breeze

Bearing celebratory voices

After a hard day’s ride.

kenne

 

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