Archive for the ‘Arizona’ Tag

Monsoon Weather Has Moved On   Leave a comment

Monsoon Weather Has Moved On — Santa Catalina Mountains Image by kenne

Coyote Buttes Panorama   1 comment

Coyote Buttes in Vermillion Cliffs National Monument — Panorama by kenne

“Ask yourself: “Does this subject move me to feel, think and dream?”

-Ansel Adams.

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay   Leave a comment

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay In The Grand Canyon (October 2021) — Image by kenne

Antelope Island   3 comments

Antelope Island On Lake Powell (June 26, 2014) — Image by kenne

The western United States is in a megadrought, and it’s getting worse. Currently, it is the driest it
has been in 1,200 years and is presently playing outlive. This image was taken in June of 2014 on Lake Powell
when the water level had already moved away, making it more a mountain than an island. Today the water levels
of both Lake Powell and Lake Mead are at record lows.
Studies of soil moisture levels in the West that includes
California, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, most of Oregon and Idaho, much of New Mexico, western Colorado,
northern Mexico, and southeast corners of Montana and Texas — using modern measurements and tree rings
for estimates that go back to the year 800. (Source: Arizona Daly Star)

Grand Canyon Panorama (October 4, 2021)   1 comment

Grand Canyon Panorama (October 4, 2021) — Image by kenne

A view to the north

With its layered bands of red rock

Near the end of day.

— kenne

Posted February 6, 2022 by kenneturner in Arizona, Grand Canyon, Information, Panorama, Poetry

Tagged with , , ,

Antelope Canyon   Leave a comment

Antelope Canyon (Lake Powell) — Image by kenne

“The only true wisdom is knowing you know nothing.” 

— Socrates

Antelope Canyon   Leave a comment

Antelope Canyon Boat Tour On Lake Powell (June 9, 2014) — Image by kenne

The cool way to experience Canyon is by kayaking through Lake Powell to the slot canyons, but us more

mature people take a boat. If you want a more virtual experience, there are several videos on YourTube.

— kenne

Coyote Buttes Panorama   1 comment

Coyote Buttes In Vermillion Cliffs National Monument — Panorama by kenne

“Photography, as a powerful medium of expression and communications,
offers an infinite variety of perception, interpretation and execution.”

— Ansel Adams

Silver Spotted Skipper   Leave a comment

Silver Spotted Skipper on Green-headed Coneflower (White Mountains, AZ) — Image by kenne

Wildflowers near the road

Attracting bees and butterflies

Shadows from tall pines

Passing rain clouds

Scatted drops hit the ground

Ravens on the wing

All’s right in the mountains.

— kenne

 

 

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument   1 comment

Vermillion Cliffs National Monument (03-21-12) — Image by kenne

This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre monument is a geologic treasure with some of the most spectacular
trails and views in the world. The monument contains many diverse landscapes, including the Paria Plateau,
Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. The monument borders Kaibab National Forest to the west
and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to the east. The monument includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
Cliffs Wilderness. Elevations range from 3,100 to 7,100 feet. The monument is also home to a growing number
of endangered California condors. Each year, condors hatched and raised in a captive breeding program are
released in the monument. To visit the monument, you’ll need extra planning and awareness of potential
hazards. Most roads need a high clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle due to deep sand.

— Source: The Bureau of Land Management

Finding The Way   Leave a comment

Finding the Way Through Doubtful Pass– Image by kenne

“Unfortunately I am afraid, as always, of going on. For to go on means going from here, means finding me,
losing me, vanishing and beginning again, a stranger first, then little by little the same as always, in another place,
where I shall say I have always been, of which I shall know nothing, being incapable of seeing,
moving, thinking, speaking,
but of which little by little, in spite of these handicaps, I shall begin to know something,
just enough for it to
turn out to be the same place as always, the same which seems made for me and does not want
me,
which I seem to want and do not want, take your choice, which spews me out or swallows me up, I’ll never know,
which is perhaps merely the inside of my distant skull where once I wandered, now am fixed, lost for tininess, or
straining against the walls, with my head, my hands, my feet, my back, and ever murmuring my old stories,
my old
story, as if it were the first time.”

― from The Unnamable by Samuel Beckett

Meditation on Ceremonies of Beginnings   3 comments

Fancy Dancer by Ethel Mortenson Davis

. . . I have been following Thomas Davis’ blog since 2012, and feel so fortunate to have found his blog.
“With billions of humans on this earth, it’s not easy to connect with poets who express the
human experience so worthy of being a poet’s poet. Thomas can open the door to why we exist!”

Meditation on Ceremonies of Beginnings — The Tribal College and World Indigenous Nations Higher
Education Consortium Poems was recently by Tribal College Press. Davis sees the book of poems as
“an introduction to the tribal college movement and the world of Indigenous nations.”

These poems tell the story of the tribal college movement. Davis writes, “They record history in a different way.
History is not just made up of facts and events, as momentous as those events may be, but also of
emotions, dreams, striving, failing, tragedy, struggling against long odds, laughter, joy, and
personalities that make significant differences even as those contributions are lost when
historians begin to shuffle through dust bins of primary sources.

In March, 2003, Robert Martin invited Davis to Tohono O’odham in southern Arizona.
While there, he wrote “A Visit to Tohono O’odham Community College
as It is Being Born, 2/6/03.”

Thomas Davis Source: Green Bay Press-Gazette

The poem begins:

Perry Horse said,
looking out to saguaro cactus, palo verde trees, bone-
white trunk of an eucalyptus tree, brown dryness of
desert, steep dirt sides of an arroyo,
“can you smell this place?
It smells different from your country with its trees, big
water, and winter’s deep cold.”
The arroyo channeled toward large skirts of a
mountain
that raised brown earth, dark rock into rare clouds
that looked as if they might hold rain.
Green smells of Tohono O’odham Nation were as
pale as trunks of the palo verde trees.

The last paragraph in the poem reads:

American has always been a nation of peoples, of
nations.
In desert air at night
stars hover bright and close to dark mountains
that shine and breathe
as we sing
into another time.

Davis, 74, lives in Sturgeon Bay and is the author of the award-winning novel 
“In the Unsettled Homeland of Dreams,” and other works.
He still serves in leadership roles at several tribal colleges.

— kenne

Hoover Dam Road   2 comments

Hoover Dam Road — Image by kenne

I prefer the original name, Boulder Dam. Originally known as Boulder Dam from 1933,
it was officially renamed Hoover Dam for President Herbert Hoover by a joint resolution
of Congress in 1947.

— kenne

Common Buckeye Butterfly   1 comment

Common Buckeye Butterfly (Junonia coenia) — Image by kenne

So, I begin researching articles on butterfly color and found “The evolution of color:
How butterfly wings can shift in hue” in ScienceDaily. They found that buckeyes
and other Junonia species can create a rainbow of structural colors simply by tuning
the thickness of the wing scale’s bottom layer (the lamina), which creates
iridescent colors in the same way a soap bubble does. 

“In each Junonia species, structural color came from the lamina. And they are producing
a big range of lamina thicknesses that create a rainbow of different colors, everything
from gold to magenta to blue to green,” says first author Rachel Thayer.
“This helps us understand how structural color has evolved over millions of years.”

You can find more information structured color at Marine Biological Laboratory.
(Please note, I’m a photographer, not a biologist.)

— kenne

Boulder Dam Panorama   7 comments

Boulder Dam Viewed from the Arizona Side (November 5, 2020) — Panorama by kenne

Most of the time, when we drive to Las Vegas from Tucson, we pass by the dam.
The last time we stopped, we drove the two-lane road on top of the dam on our way back
to Houston in 2007. The Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge was under
construction and was not completed until 2010. The drive across the Boulder Dam
would take quite a while, depending on the volume of traffic.

The Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge Above the Boulder Dam  (upper left corner) — Image by kenne

Currently, the Lake Mead water level is 147.41 feet below the full pool of 1,229.00,
40% of its full capacity. The Colorado River, which supplies Nevada,
Arizona and California, most of its water, has long been chronically overused
and has dwindled during two decades of mostly dry years. The drought has been
worsened by higher temperatures unleashed by climate change. 

— kenne

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