Archive for the ‘Hugh Poland’ Tag

Roadrunner Images For Hugh — A Photo Essay   2 comments

I’ve taken many roadrunner photos in the almost 12 years we have lived in Tucson. This photo essay is representative of the images. 
Last October, Hugh Poland and I spent some time photographing wildlife in southern Arizona, and he was most disappointed in not seeing any Greater Roadrunners. However, he’s planning an August trip to attend a Tucson Audubon Society event here in southeast Arizona.
So maybe he will see and photograph some roadrunners. (Click on any image to view it in a slideshow format.)

— kenne

The Ole Roadrunner
(For Sara from Uncle Johnny)
 
Want to tell you a story
Bout a bird that can run.
He can fly up in trees, but
To race is more fun.
He’s a runner at heart
He lurks like a trickster
Darts out on the road
Goes faster and faster.
He’s sleek, and he’s quick
Keep watch and don’t blink
Out he will jump
And be gone in a wink.
Not easy to catch
Roadrunners are wary
To chase is to fail
Ask Wile E Coyote’!
Birds like to sing
To cheep and to peep.
This one is different
He likes to Beep.
So when out in the car
Keep your eye on the road
If you see something running
It might be this Ole Bird.
Beep Beep!
 
— John Deen

Greater Roadrunner — Southeast Arizona Images by kenne

Stary Sacz, A Poem by Adam Zagajewski     Leave a comment

Red-bellied Woodpecker (Kingwood, Texas) — Image by Hugh Poland

Stary Sacz

A woodpecker in his red cap suddenly brought back
the stationmaster in Stary Sacz.
Over the station rose a little town,
that is, an enormous market and convent of Poor Clares;
each house had one window holding jars of borscht and pickles.

The innkeeper’s daughter was so thin
that she kept bricks in her backpack to outwit the wind
when she crossed the viaduct above the train tracks.
The wind never got her, but other elements weren’t idle,
especially Nothingness and her rich suitor, Mr. Time.

Adam Zagajewski

******

Robert Pinsky wrote in The New Republic: “[In the poetry of Adam Zagajewski] the unmistakable quality
of the real thing–a sunlike force that wilts clichés and bollixes that categories of expectation–
manifests itself powerfully . . . Like a fish breaking water . . . the achievement of these poems [“Without End”]
is partly in that act of rising above a lived-in element. In Zagajewski’s work, the engulfing, ferocious
historical reality appears as our habitat–not a well of horrors to be borrowed for rhetorical thunder,
not an occasion for verse punditry, not a mere backdrop for sensibility. And the perception of that habitat
has a mysterious, elating power.”

A Limpkin Near The Gulf Coast   1 comment

Limpkin — Image by Hugh Poland

“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only make them think.”

— Socrates

Birding In Ecuador   1 comment

Andean Cockof the Rock — Image by Hugh Poland

In early February, my stepson-in-law went birding in Ecuador. Upon his return to Kingwood, Texas, Hugh put together this trip video.

— kenne

Tufted Titmouse   Leave a comment

Tufted Titmouse, Kingwood, Texas (October 9, 2021) — Image by Hugh Poland

The Tufted Titmouse is not found in the southwest but is common in eastern deciduous forests and
a frequent visitor to feeders. The large black eyes, small, round bill, and brushy crest gives these
birds a quiet but eager expression that matches the way they flit through canopies, hang from twig
ends, and drop in to bird feeders. When a titmouse finds a large seed, you’ll see it carry the prize to
a perch and crack it with sharp whacks of its stout bill.
— Source: All About Birds

Great Blue Heron — Right Place, Right Time   1 comment

Great Blue Heron (East Park, Lake Houston –10-17-21) — Image by Hugh Poland

Great Blue Herons are the largest of the North American herons, standing tall over wetlands and shores of open water.
Great Blue Herons are blue-gray overall with a wide black stripe over their eye and a long yellow-orangish bill.
In flight their wings are two-toned with blueish forewings and black flight feathers, and their neck is usually coiled in,
unlike the similarly sized Sandhill Cranes.

 
Great Blue Herons are highly adaptable and can be found in marshes, swamps, shores, and tideflats. Some will even forage
in grasslands and agricultural fields. They have a general diet consisting of fish, frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes, insects, rodents,
and even other birds. Great Blue Herons will stand or walk slowly through shallow water before quickly striking with their long bill,
grabbing small prey or impaling large fish. Great Blue Herons nest in colonies, and usually build nests high in the trees,
but will occasionally nest on the ground or in low shrubs.

Bryce Loschen (Houston Audubon)

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