Archive for the ‘White-winged Dove’ Tag

White Winged Dove and Ocotillo Blossoms   2 comments

Whitewinged Dove On Ocotillo-3846-72

Whitewinged Dove On Ocotillo-3847-72

Whitewinged Dove On Ocotillo-3848-72White Winged Dove and Ocotillo Blossoms — Images by kenne

Our summer friends have returned from winter in Mexico. These images were taken from just off our patio — welcome back!

— kenne

White-Winged Dove — Three Photos   Leave a comment

White winged dove-0249 blog

White winged dove-0250 blog

White Winged Dove-0252 blogWhite-Winged Dove — Images by kenne

The white-winged doves spend their summers here in southern Arizona. There are signs they are beginning to migrate south for the remainder of the year. 

Here’s a link to an early June posting when they were arriving in the area.
https://kenneturner.com/2017/06/07/feasting-on-saguaro-cactus-fruit/

— kenne

Feasting On Saguaro Cactus Fruit   2 comments

Each spring the white-winged doves return from wintering in Mexico and the air is filled with their mating calls. The hoots and coos are so common they sometimes drown out the sounds of other birds.

White Winged Dove (1 of 1) blog

The return of the white-winged doves plays a very important role in the life cycle of the saguaro cactus. When saguaros flower, white-winged doves move from flower to flower, sipping nectar and pollinating the plant.

White-Winged Dove on Saguaro-1764 blogOnce the flowers become fruit, the doves have a new food source. The sweet fruit is filled with thousands of tiny seeds, which pass unharmed through the digestive system of the dove. If seeds are passed while the dove is perched on a tree or bush, that tree or bush might become a nurse plant to the growing saguaro. Such a plant protects the young saguaro from extreme weather and animals and greatly increases its chances of survival.

White-Winged Dove on Saguaro-1763 blogFor the Tohono O’odham, the saguaro cactus and its fruit (bahidaj) is a very important part of their heritage. The towering saguaro cactus provides both physical and spiritual sustenance for the people. With temperatures now over 100 degrees, the bahidaj is now ripening and being harvested by the Tohono O’odham.  (Images by kenne)

— kenne

White-winged Dove Abstract Art(1 of 1)-9 blogWhite-winged Dove Abstract Art by kenne

 

White-winged Dove After The Rain   2 comments

White-winged Dove after the rain — Images by kenne

Outside, I watched her

moving in a nearby tree

after rains ended.

— kenne

A Summer Morning In Sabino Canyon — A Photo Essay   12 comments

This time of year if you are going to spend time in Sabino Canyon, it needs to be early in the morning. It doesn’t take long before the temperature can be in the triple digits — yes, this is Tucson, Arizona.

For a lot of us who love spending time outdoors and hiking, this time of year most of our time is spent up on Mt. Lemmon. Couple that with my trying to spend more time with Joy, except for checking the mail and an occasional meeting, I haven’t been in the canyon lately.

So, this morning after a little jog in the neighborhood, I headed over to Sabino Canyon where I went on an hour and a half hike in and effort to relieve my guilt. 

Barrel Cactus (1 of 1) blog

We are still early in the desert monsoon season, so signs of the heat and dry air are everywhere. (Barrel cactus)

Sabino Creek (1 of 1) blog

Sabino creek is dry . . .

Sabino Creek (1 of 1)-2 blog

. . . and the area above the dam looks like a beach.

Sabino Creek (1 of 1)-3 blog

Down stream from the dam rocks minis water flowing over and around them have taken on different colors.

Squirrels (1 of 1) blog

Even so, there is still plenty of live in the canyon, here two squirrels are cooling themselves in the shade at the creek dam.

Ground Squirrel (1 of 1) blog

Here a busy ground squirrel checking me out before retreating into his cool den.

Saguaro Blossom (1 of 1) blog

A late-blooming Saguaro can occasionally be found.

Desert Marigold (1 of 1) blog

Desert Marigolds . . .

Desert Marigold - Butterfly (1 of 1) blog

. . . attracting butterflies.

Gall (1 of 1) blog

A gall produced by flies that inhabit creosote bushes.

ocotillo (1 of 1) blog

An ocotillo leafed out from an early July rain.

ocotillo (1 of 1)-2 blog

Another ocotillo surrounded by prickly pear cactus whose fruit is beginning to turn red.

Prickly Pear Fruit (1 of 1)-2

Prickly pear fruit.

White Winged Dove (1 of 1) blog

Still, often under austere conditions, life goes on. (Whitewinged Dove)

Sabino Canyon (1 of 1)-2 blog

The harshness of this land causes many to see the Sonoran desert to be a wasteland.

Sabino Canyon (1 of 1) blog.jpg

Those who have experienced the beauty of this amazing desert know it is not, but if left unprotected, it can become a man-made wasteland.

— kenne

Among all the geographic areas of the United States, the Southwest in general
and Arizona in particular is blessed with a panoramic beauty that almost defies description.
Only a limited number of poets, painters, and photographers
have been able to do justice to her splendor.

— Marshall Trimble, Arizona: A Panoramic History of a Frontier State, 1977

White-winged Dove Abstract Art   1 comment

White-winged Dove Abstract Art(1 of 1) blog-9White-winged Dove Abstract Art by kenne

Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.  

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

A White-Winged Dove Returns to Sabino Canyon   1 comment

Whitewinged Dove (1 of 1)-3 grunge Art blog
A White-Winged Dove Returns to Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Events are always perceived

with reference to a particular

frame. In another system of coordinates,

the same events are not the same.

— Albert Einstein

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