Archive for the ‘Palo Verde Trees’ Category

Yellow On Blue   Leave a comment

Blooming Palo Verde Tree Under A Tucson Blue Sky — Image by kenne

Yellow Is The Color Of Our Neighborhood   Leave a comment

Blue Palo Verde Are In Full Bloom In Tanuri Ridge — Images by kenne

Palo Verde

Green clinger on arid arroyo rock,
Spring blooms of faded yellow you did drop.
Desert dry took a toll of leaf and branch
Leaving photosynthesis to your bark.
Life is tough, lizard kissed, so short and harsh.
Unlike upland cousins, you are blessed:
In your shelter rests a saguaro babe,
Whose stately arms one day will take your place.

 
— David Drowley

A Palo Verde Morning   Leave a comment

Blue Palo Verde Blooming in Tanuri Ridge — Images by kenne

Blue Palo Verde tree
A desert spring signature
Blossoms everywhere.

Morning walks add steps
Only to pause now and then
In a yellow world.

— kenne

 

Palo Verde Blossoms   1 comment

Palo Verde Blossoms — Image by kenne

Interesting Facts About the Palo Verde Tree:

— The Arizona state tree

— The name in Spanish means “green stick”

— Can live to be over 100 years old

— Can grow up to 30 feet

— Cause few or no allergy symptoms

— The flowers and seeds are edible

— The primary nursing plant for baby saguaros

 

Palo Verde Trees In The Spring   1 comment

Palo Verde Trees In the Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

The palo verde tree is Arizona’s state tree, and rightfully so since once established, these trees truly need no
supplemental water to live. The tree’s bark is green and can photosynthesize something that in most plants,
only leaves do. This characteristic also allows the leaves to be very small and drop off during extreme drought conditions.

In the Sonoran desert, there are four types of palo verde trees. The above image illustrates two; the Blue Palo Verde
on the left and the Foothills Palo Verde on the right. The Blue Palo Verde will generally bloom first in the spring,
followed by the Foothills a few weeks later. During April, you can see these trees blooming everywhere in Tucson.

— kenne

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