Archive for the ‘Mt. Lemmon’ Tag

Nature Is My Home   Leave a comment

Yarrow Wildflower On Mt. Lemmon — Image by kenne

“Nature is not a place to visit. It is home.”

— Gary Snyder

Red-Top Mushroom Photo-Artistry   1 comment

Red-Top Mushroom — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.”

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson

Before The Fire   2 comments

Mt. Lemmon, San Pedro Valley Vista Before the Big Horn Fire — Image by kenne

“You can’t divide the country up into sections and have one rule for one section
and one rule for another, and you can’t encourage people’s prejudices.
You have to appeal to people’s best instincts, not their worst ones.
You may win an election or so by doing the other,
but it does a lot of harm to the country.”

— Jon Meacham, The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels

Lemmon Rock Lookout   2 comments

Lemmon Rock Lookout — Photo-Artistry by kenne

There’s a lookout on a rock
That’s called, Lemmon Rock.

Placed on the side of Mt. Lemmon
Where a ranger with his dog

Watch over the Catalina’s.
Listening to echoes of liance.

Fires have come close
But never close for cause 

To abandoned the watch
Tracking the forest’s future

Thinking about a poem
They will never write.

— kenne

 

Revising Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #8   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Thurber cinquefoil Wildflower — Image by kenne

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #7   1 comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Coulter Hibiscus Wildflowers — Image by kenne

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #6   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Birdbill  Dayflower (08/29/14) — Image by kenne

 

Boletus porosporus Mushroom   Leave a comment

Boletus porosporus Mushroom, Mt. Lemmon, Santa Catalina Mountains (08/29/14) — Image by kenne

With very few exceptions, boletes are mycorrhizal partners with trees, and can be found in forest
and urban ecosystems across our continent, wherever ectomycorrhizal trees are present.
Some boletes are very picky about their mycorrhizal partners, while others seem to be able
to associate only with groups of related trees—and still others may be able to associate with very diverse trees.

— mushroomexpert.com

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #5   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Common Yarrow Wildflower On Mt. Lemmon (09/25/14) — Image by kenne

Butterfly On The Rocks   Leave a comment

Arizona Sister Butterfly (08/16/13) — Image by kenne

In deep shady canyons within the Sonoran Desert and more commonly at higher elevations the Arizona Sister
is a common and welcome sight. The caterpillars use a variety of oak species as a host plant.
In the photo at left there are two adult Arizona Sister butterflies drawing sap from a wound in the trunk
of an old oak tree. A closer look will also reveal two additional butterflies, well camouflaged.
The two are Asterocampa leilia, Desert Hackberry Butterfly.  arizonensis.org

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #3   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Honeybee on Sneezeweed Blossom (07/30/14, Mt. Lemmon) — Image by kenne

WATERMARK

In every desert, travelers have dried up in the sun,
with shallow wells of water right below them.
perhaps they left too soon, too young, too desperate to run
towards something or away from something else.

Perhaps they hadn’t learned the way to read the tiny trails,
the watermarks remaining from a people who have gone,
whose hieroglyphs translate — in the direction is a spring 
of sweet water. Look for it. Or is it, listen?

— Diane Thiel

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #2   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Birdbill Dayflower — Image by kenne

“The flowers emerge one at a time from large, green to maroon-tinged, hairy to hairless,
folded, boatlike spathes (leaf-like bracts) with an elongated, tapering tip that resembles a bird’s bill.
The individual flowers have 3 blue petals, fertile and sterile stamens with blue, hairless filaments,
and 3 staminodes (sterile stamens) with yellow, cross-shaped antherodes (sterile anthers).
The lowest flower petal is somewhat smaller than the other 2 petals. The flowers only last for a day.
The flowers are followed by seed capsules that mature within the spathes. The leaf sheaths are
maroon-streaked and wrap the stems. The leaf blades are green, hairless to hairy,
and linear to linear-lanceolate in shape. The stems are green to maroon-tinged,
succulent, erect to ascending, and unbranched or sparsely branched.”

— Southeastern Arizona Wildflowers and Plants

Cabin On Mt. Lemmon   1 comment

Cabin In The Woods — Photo-Artistry by kenne

In capturing the moment,

reality

is rephrased

making use of light and

angles between objects,

creating an illusion

of space and distance —

a new view of reality.

 

The new reality

brings with it

a rhythm,

and sound

resonating

with the soul –

hopefully,

with the viewer.

 

The image

becomes a model

of what is real —

what is real is

imagined –

the affirmation

of nature.

 

The artist adds,

or takes away —

still real,

but totally invented

and fully imagined –

the objectification

of feeling.

 

The new reality

is shaped

and nurtured

from the past,

erased and reinvented —

if the artist is lucky

the new image

will seem more real

and more true.

— kenne

Image by kenne

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