Archive for the ‘Wildflowers’ Category

I Dream of A Quiet Man   1 comment

Fiddleneck Wildflowers — Photo-Artistry by kenne

I dream of a quiet man
who explains nothing and defends
nothing, but only knows
where the rarest wildflowers
are blooming, and who goes,
and finds that he is smiling
not by his own will.

― Wendell Berry 

Autumn Mountain Wildflowers   3 comments

Autumn Mountain Wildflowers — Image by kenne

Autumn wildflowers in southeast Arizona begin blooming in late October as
the weather cools, and will continue blooming until the hard frosts of
late November, early December. Scattered wildflowers can be observed
here in lower elevation desert areas almost all year-round.

Mountain Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Wildflowers on Mt. Lemmon, Santa Catalina Mountains — Images by kenne

What is the late November doing
With the disturbance of the spring
And creatures of the summer heat,
And snowdrops writhing under feet
And hollyhocks that aim too high
Red into grey and tumble down
Late roses filled with early snow?
Thunder rolled by the rolling stars
Simulates triumphal cars
Deployed in constellated wars
Scorpion fights against the sun
Until the Sun and Moon go down
Comets weep and Leonids fly
Hunt the heavens and the plains
Whirled in a vortex that shall bring
The world to that destructive fire
Which burns before the ice-cap reigns

— from Four Quartets by T. S. Eliot

Frank S. Rose, 09/11/27 – 10/15/20   2 comments

Mountain Wildflowers of Southern Arizona —
A Field Guide to the Santa Catalina Mountains and Other Nearby Ranges by Frank S. Rose

When I began hiking the mountains of southern Arizona, I always had my
camera with me. If you follower of this blog, you know there are many
photos of beautiful mountain wildflowers, most of which I could not identify.
However, Frank S. Rose made it easy for me to put names with the photos
with the publication of his field guide in 2011. 

For years before the guide’s publication, Frank spent summers painting
watercolor images of the wildflowers. But, much like myself, he experienced
difficulty identifying the wildflowers. It wasn’t until Frank got to know Joan Tedford,
Bob Porter and other Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists spending time
with them on their weekly nature walks, that he began to work on his
photographic field guide.

Thank you, Frank, for your many hours and miles of walking, searching,
photographing and learning about flowers from which so many of us have benefited.

— kenne

 

Joan Tedford, Debbie Bird, Edi Moore, Heather Murphy, and Frank Rose (May 2, 2016) — Images by kenne

In this video, Frank Rose tells the story of how he met Joan Tedford.

 

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #9   Leave a comment

This summer, the Big Horn Fire caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Field of Western Sneezeweed Along Mt. Lemmon’s Meadow Trail (08/21/12) — Image by kenne

Revisiting Mt. Lemmon Wildflowers #1   Leave a comment

The Big Horn fire this summer caused so much damage to the National Forest
in the Santa Catalina Mountains remains closed to the public. Therefore,
hiking and photographing wildflowers in the Catalinas will not be in 2020,
which provides a good excuse to revisit some wildflower photos over the past ten summers.

Richardson’s Geranium (07/30/14) — Image by kenne

Raven On A Rock   Leave a comment

SCVN Weds Walk 08-01-12Raven On A Rock with Bearded penstemon Wildflowers — Image by kenne

 

Molino Basin Flowers   1 comment

Yucca Blossom-72Yucca Blossom in Molino Basin (April 24, 2020) — Photo Essay by kenne

 

 

Holding the hope of morning
I walk down the Arizona trail

mission to photograph flowers
in the dry cool mountain air

looking for objects I do not have
nurtured in the space of time.

Now in late April mountain flowers
take on a long life brought about by

elevation changes and summer rains
pushing flowers into warped time.

— kenne

Mountain Wildflowers   Leave a comment

Mountain Marigold-72.jpg

Western Sneezeweed-72Mountain Wildflowers — Images by kenne

“Each flower is a soul opening out to nature.”  

— Gerald De Nerval

 

 

More Alike Than Different   2 comments

Where Did You Come From? (1 of 1) blog“Welcome To Our Party” — Image by kenne

you look different

but look beyond the surface

we are more alike

Sonoran Desert Wildflowers   1 comment

Picacho Peak

Hiking The Sweetwater Trail   Leave a comment

Sweetwater Trail Panorama-72Panorama of the Santa Catalina Mountains from the Sweetwater Trail in the Tucson Mountains (March 15, 2019)
— Images by kenne

SCVN members and guests hiked the Sweetwater Trail
Friday, March 15, 2019, on a beautiful spring day.
As has been the case for a couple of weeks,
wildflowers are blooming everywhere
with a background of wispy white clouds
on a canvas of blue. 

— kenne

There’s A Reason Why The Sonoran Desert Is Called A Lush Desert   1 comment

This time of year Picacho Peak State Park is an excellent example of the biodiversity of the Sonoran Desert.
Plants are at the greenest and wildflowers provide dots of color on the desert canvass.

The canvass of the desert
may appear to have no order.
Yet it is orderly,
but we don’t know why.

A poet has said;
If you want to know
where the flowers came from,
not even the spring goddess knows.

— kenne

Panorama west of Picacho Peak-72.jpg

Images by kenne

 

Desert Lupine   1 comment

Desert Lupine-72Desert Lupine — Image by kenne

We walk
the lower canyon
after spring rains.
The creek
runs swiftly 
from
mountain snow pelt.

Cottonwoods
beginning to leaf,

wildflowers
cover the ground —

a new cycle of life.

— kenne

Desert Globemallow — Sphaeralcea ambigua   2 comments

Desert Globemallow Sphaeralcea ambigua copy

Desert Globemallow Sphaeralcea ambigua-1Desert Globemallow (Shaeralcea ambigua) In Sabino Canyon — Images by kenne

Sabino Canyon
A place to walk in nature
Especially now.

— kenne

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