Archive for the ‘nature walk’ Category

Hedgehog Cactus Blossoms   3 comments

Engelmann’s Hedgehog Blossoms — Image by kenne

Scarlet Hedgehog Blossoms — Image by kenne

On a desert hike

Signs of spring are everywhere

Just look around you.

— kenne

The Woods Do That To You . . .   1 comment

Santa Catalina Mountains — Image by kenne

“I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all.
The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long lost,
like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream,
like a piece of forgotten song drifting across the water,
most of all like golden eternities of past childhood or
past manhood and all the living and the dying and the
heartbreak that went on a million years ago and the clouds
as they pass overhead seem to testify
(by their own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling.”

–Jack Kerouac

A Fun Day On The Beach   Leave a comment

A Fun Day On The Beach (August 2021)– Photo-Artistry by kenne

On this winter day
it’s nice to look
back on the fun
days of summer
being in the sun
with bikini-clad girls. 
Eye popping!

— kenne

Bee On Fairy Duster Wildflower   Leave a comment

Bee On Fairy Duster Wildflower (July 16, 2021) — Image by kenne

The draft of this posting was done in late July before we went on our August road trip.
However, many photos later, just today, I noticed this unpublished draft —
Better late than never.

— kenne

 

Sneezeweed Art   Leave a comment

Sneezeweed Art by kenne

Green to blue

Yellow to orange

New to old

— kenne

Hiking Box Camp Trail   Leave a comment

Hiking Up Box Camp Trail In The Santa Catalina Mountains — Image by kenne

The Tucson basin

Santa Rita’s to the south

Hiking Box Camp trail

 

Leaving the tall pines

An existential moment

Illumination

— kenne


Cut Saguaro Ten Years Out   3 comments

I took this image in September 2011 while on my first Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) nature walk. 
I was so appalled that someone cut off the top of this young (probably 35-40 years old) saguaro cactus.

Sadly, over the years, I have frequently seen this type of vandalism.

This Image, taken July 27, 2021, illustrates the resiliency of nature. — Image by kenne

Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns,
so that each small piece of her fabric reveals
the organization of the entire tapestry.

— Richard Feynman

 

Cactus Wren   1 comment

Cactus Wren — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Photography comes from the moment

existing at the time it was created.”

— kenne

Fiddleneck Wildflowers   1 comment

Fiddleneck Wildflowers — Image by kenne

always take the time
when you are walking outdoors
to look more closely

nature surprises
keep eyes wide open

— kenne

 

Marine Blue   3 comments

Marine Blues On a Green-headed Coneflower — Image by kenne

More rain over night

More sweat in the morning walk

Fewer walkers out

— kenne

Redwing Blackbird   Leave a comment

Redwing Blackbird (Sweetwater Wetlands, June 16,2021) — Image by kenne

The redwing blackbird

Not your average blackbird

A badge of honor.

— kenne

Green Heron Near Pond Slider Turtles   Leave a comment

Green Heron Near Pond Slider Turtles (Sweetwater Wetlands, June 16, 2021) — Image by kenne

The green heron looks tempted by the presence of the pond slider turtles before flying off in search of smaller prey.

— kenne

 

Duckweed Days At Sweetwater Wetlands   3 comments

Mallard Ducks on Emerald-green Duckweed Pond (Sweetwater Wetlands, June 16, 2021) — Image by kenne

Duckweed, an emerald-green hydroponic plant, has covered most ponds at the wetlands this summer. 
The plant, which grows on the water surface without soil, makes irregular warm-season appearances at
Sweetwater, which doubles as a wastewater treatment facility and lush wildlife habitat.

Duckweed is harmless and disappears naturally in the fall. It removes nitrates from the reclaimed water,
and it’s good for the ducks. It’s a plant that ducks eat, providing a lot of protein.

— kenne

 

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly   Leave a comment

Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly — Image by kenne

The Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) is one of my favorite butterflies common in the Tucson area.  It is a
large butterfly with a wingspan of about 3.5 inches. This butterfly ranges throughout the U.S. and Central America.

Hutton’s Vireo   1 comment

Hutton’s Vireo — Image by kenne

Hutton’s Vireo is a small songbird that bears an uncanny resemblance to a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. They can be
found in the Pacific coastal regions, where they tend to be richer green and yellow. However, in southeastern
Arizona, they are grayer like this one I photographed recently in the Cienega Creek Preserve. 

— kenne

 
%d bloggers like this: