Archive for the ‘Pusch Ridge WIlderness’ Tag

Pusch Ridge Wilderness Panorama   Leave a comment

Marshall Gulch #3Pusch Ridge Wilderness In the Santa Catalina Mountains– Panorama by kenne

Feel the thrill of being in the moment.

— kenne

 

Fountain Grass   2 comments

Baby Jesus Trail Nov 2012Fountain Grass in the Santa Catalina Mountains — Image by kenne

Fountain grass is commonly used desert landscape in Tucson. Yes, it’s attractive, but it produces lots of seeds that spread rapidly from cultivation into nearby disturbed areas, and eventually into natural habitats. It typically forms dense stands, aggressively competes with native species, especially perennial grasses, and seasonal annuals, for space, water, and nutrients. The above photograph was taken in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness area in the Santa Catalina Mountains several miles from where it may have been part of someone’s landscape.

Forest Fires are common in the mountains of southern Arizona, and fountain grass provides lots of fuel and is well adapted to fire therefore is a serious threat to the native species.

— kenne

Hutch’s Pool   2 comments

Kenne blogKenne enjoying one of his favorite places in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Hutch’s Pool

I love the eight-plus mile hike to Hutch’s Pool in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness area in the Santa Catalina Mountains, but because of a shoulder injury, I will not be a part of this Fall’s hike — Bummer!

— kenne

Time Of The Heart   1 comment

Pusch Ridge-8544 blogPusch Ridge Wilderness — Image by kenne

Time of The Heart

High above the city
stands the fool on the hill

Watching thin clouds move in
while chanting the reflection –

“Use me while you can,
for if you but blink,

I will be gone
no more on this watch.”

— kenne

Sycamore Canyon Trail   Leave a comment

Sycamore Canyon Panorma IMG_3198 blogSycamore Canyon Panorama — Image by kenneSycamore Canyon-_Art III blogSycamore Canyon Trail — Computer Painting by kenne

Yesterday’s (April 28, 2017) hike from the Gordon Hirabayashi Campgrounds (4,880′ elevation) to the Sycamore Reservoir was the last SCVN Friday hike on our Spring schedule. Eleven people, including three guides, took #39 trail out of the campgrounds to the Sycamore Reservoir, a somewhat out of the way riparian area in the Sycamore Canyon in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness. The trail is 3.25 miles one way with an accumulated gain of 821 feet. The trail is also a segment of the Arizona Trail, providing majestic views, including Thimble Pear and Cathedral Rock.

This is one of my favorite hikes at the mid-level elevation of the Santa Catalina Mountains, so I was pleased to be the lead guide for the eleven hikers, which included three women from Germany.

The SCVN guided hikes will start again in June on Mt. Lemmon.

kenne

Bad Day On Lemmon Rock   5 comments

Lemmon Rock Trail (1 of 1) blog

Pusch Ridge Wilderness — Image by kenne

BAD DAY ON LEMMON ROCK

The wilderness area of the Santa Catalina Mountains
provides many beautiful vistas, large majestic
rock formations and several challenging hiking trails.

For the start of the fall hiking season,
the naturalists scheduled a hike starting
at the highest point atop Mount Lemmon.

In a prologue to frost and early fall colors,
we arranged a shuttle car at Marshall Gulch
so not to double back the six and a half mile hike.

Having led this hike two months ago,
it combines four trails leading down into and out
of the Pusch Ridge Wilderness to Marshall Gulch.

Beginning on the Mount Lemmon trail,Wilderness Rock Trail 09-01-14-3658Lemmon Rock Lookout blog
we follow a forest service road through
upper mountain meadows to the Lemmon Rock trail.

The two rocky trails provide a steep 1,800 foot drop
through tall pines on rocky slopes lined with thorny shrubs
with an occasional cairn marking the many switchbacks.

However, cairns are of little help if I misread
a marker and attempts to create my own trail
down an even steeper rocky slope.

Taking a wrong turn at a trail marker,
which was about an hour into the hike,

was the beginning of my bad day on Lemmon Rock.

It quickly became apparent my pace was too fast
for the rocky slope I was proceeding down, planting
my right foot so to begin a slide, only to twist my ankle.

The pain told me this was not a slight twist of the ankle —
Oh SHIT! SHIT! SHIT! Holding back additional profanity,
I quickly started getting up, checking out the damage.

Anyone who hikes with me knows I usually
have my four pound camera/lens on
the left shoulder, which I balance with the left hand.

Not this time, since I was wearing
a center-body camera harness —
for the first time not focusing on saving my camera.

In pain, I did a four-point crawl up to the trail
after answering some ankle movement questions
from a fellow hiker, a retired foot doctor.

Continuing to walk on the rocky trail was difficult —
generating expressions of concern from everyone,
some checking their backpacks for an ankle wraps.

Someone had a velcro Ace bandage,
without which I would not have been able
to continue the remaining five miles to the gulch.

The ankle wrap was a blessing, but having now
given the experience more thought, although a steep climb,
the shorted hike would have been back up to the top.

We live and learn, or do we?
Would I hike five miles again on a sprained ankle?
I hope I never have to face the question.

How, here I sit with my wrapped
black and blue swollen ankle iced down —
guess I won’t be hiking again soon.

kenne

springed ankle (1 of 1)-2 blogSprained Ankle — Image by Jeff

 

Capturing The Moment — Parish Larkspur Wildflower   5 comments

 

Wildflower (1 of 1)-2 b framed

Wildflower (1 of 1) b framedParish Larkspur (Delphinium parishii) — Image by kenne

This deep blue wildflower was near the Hutch’s Pool trail at about 3,900 ft. in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness above the Sabino Basin. I needed help in identifying this beautiful deep blue wildflower, which I received from fellow SCVN members. This one is a much deeper blue than the one pictured in Frank Rose’s “Mountain Wildflowers of Southern Arizona.” The conditions have been very dry in the Catalina Mountains this Spring, producing fewer than normal wildflowers. This larkspur was all alone.

kenne

%d bloggers like this: