Archive for the ‘John Steinbeck’ Tag

Universes In Our Cells   Leave a comment

Kids Fun Run — Image by kenne

“Why do we so dread to think of our species as a species? Can it be that we are afraid of what we may find? That human self-love would suffer too much and that the image of God might prove to be a mask? This could be only partly true, for if we could cease to wear the image of a kindly, bearded, interstellar dictator, we might find ourselves true images of his kingdom, our eves the nebulae, and universes in our cells.”

 
― from The Log from the Sea of Cortez by John Steinbeck
 

Driving A Desert Highway   4 comments

Christmas 2012Driving a Desert Highway Into the Sunset — Image by kenne

John Steinbeck best describes the desert sunset,
especially when driving down a long stretch of highway.
I think of his words often when viewing sunsets — valued added.

— kenne

A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon
and then dripped over and was gone,
and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone,
and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag,
hung over the spot of its going.
And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon,
and darkness crept over the land from the east.

― John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

 

Man, A Two-legged Paradox   Leave a comment

sea-of-cortes-sunset1-of-1-blogSunset over the Sea of Cortez from Hacienda de los Santos in Guaymas, Sonora (January 24, 2016) — Image by kenne 

Cardón Cactus In Shades of Blue   4 comments

Sunset at Guaymas (1 of 1 blog)Cardón Cactus in Shades of Blue (Guaymas, Sonora on the Sea of Cortez, January 24, 2016) — Image by kenne

“[…] it is a strange thing that most of the feeling we call religious, most of the mystical outcrying which is one of the most prized and used and desired reactions of our species, is really the understanding and the attempt to say that man is related to the whole thing, related inextricably to all reality, known and unknowable. This is a simple thing to say, but the profound feeling of it made a Jesus, a St. Augustine, a St. Francis, a Roger Bacon, a Charles Darwin, and an Einstein. Each of them in his own tempo and with his own voice discovered and reaffirmed with astonishment the knowledge that all things are one thing and that one thing is all things—plankton, a shimmering phosphorescence on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe, all bound together by the elastic string of time. It is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again.”

― John Steinbeck, The Log from the Sea of Cortez

The Road Goes On And On Into The Sunset   9 comments

Christmas 2012

“The Road Goes On And On Into The Sunset”  —  Image by kenne

A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon

and then dripped over and was gone,

and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone,

and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag,

hung over the spot of its going.

And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon,

and darkness crept over the land from the east.

― John SteinbeckThe Grapes of Wrath

 

“Though it seems that I know that I know . . .”   4 comments

Tom Turner

Tom Turner

Tom Markey

Tom Markey

Images by kenne
(This posting id dedicated to my brother, Tom Turner and my close friend, Tom Markey.)

Munford & Sons is a group I love to listen to and one of my favorite songs is “Timshel,” which  means “thou mayest” in Hebrew and is an important symbol in the novel, East of Eden, by John Steinbeck.

“But the Hebrew word, the word timshel—‘Thou mayest’— that gives a choice. It might be the most important word in the world. That says the way is open. That throws it right back on a man. For if ‘Thou mayest’—it is also true that ‘Thou mayest not.”

Timshel is everywhere in life, what existence is all about — “thou mayest” gives meaning to our thoughts and actions, the source of becoming emotionally attached to the world. Life begins to lose its significance as meaning become limited and bound. 

“Though it seems that I know that I know, what I would like to see is the ‘I’ that knows ‘me’ when I know that I know that I know.”

 — The Book, by Alan Watts

kenne

“Timshel”

 

Cold is the water
It freezes your already cold mind
Already cold, cold mind
And death is at your doorstep
And it will steal your innocence
But it will not steal your substance

But you are not alone in this
And you are not alone in this
As brothers we will stand and we’ll hold your hand
Hold your hand

And you are the mother
The mother of your baby child
The one to whom you gave life
And you have your choices
And these are what make man great
His ladder to the stars

But you are not alone in this
And you are not alone in this
As brothers we will stand and we’ll hold your hand
Hold your hand

And I will tell the night
Whisper, “Lose your sight”
But I can’t move the mountains for you

 

 

 

 

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