Archive for the ‘Tanque Verde Wash’ Tag

Fence Along the Wash   Leave a comment

Fence Along the Tanque Verde Wash — Image by kenne

Hat on the fence post

Do not put on any airs

You goddess of gloom.

— kenne

Giant Reed   Leave a comment

Giant Reed In The Tanque Verde Wash — Image by kenne

Giant reed is an invasive grass common to riparian areas, streams, and rivers throughout the Southwest.
It thrives in moist soils (moderately saline or freshwater), sand dunes, and wetland areas. 

Giant reed forms dense, monocultural stands and often crowds out native vegetation for soil moisture, nutrients, and space.
When dry, it is highly flammable and becomes a fire danger in riparian habitats unaccustomed to sustaining fire.
It uses far more water than native vegetation, thus disturbing the natural flood regime.

Shoots and stems grow rapidly (as much as 4 inches per day during spring), outpacing native plant growth.
Shallow parts of the root system along stream edges are susceptible to undercutting, which contributes to bank
collapse and spreading of reproductive parts downstream. Giant reed grows back quickly following a fire,
thereby increasing its dominance over native riparian species.

I spotted this growth out in the Tanque Verde wash while walking the trail near the wash the other morning.

— kenne

Source: Forest Service

 

The Hanging Tree   2 comments

The Hanging Tree — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 
Morning walks where dead trees 
take on a new life near the trail
by the Tanque Verde wash.
 
Falling limbs are collected 
always searching for a design
transforming life in a new way.
 
A treasure awaits the hiker 
in a state of things recovered
only the eye of the wise can see.
 
Make the invisible become visible
breaking the pact with the unseen
each day’s magic moment.
 
— kenne
 

 

Desert Willow Blossoms   1 comment

Desert Willow Blossoms Along the Tanque Verde Wash Trail — Images by kenne

Walks come earlier

As desert days get hotter

Out of bed by five.

— kenne

Sculpture Building In Progress   Leave a comment

Sculpture Building in Progress Near the Tanque Verde Wash — Image by kenne

I have time to photograph

they have time to create art

for trail walkers near the wash.

— kenne

Shades Of Gray   Leave a comment

Shades Of Gray — Photo-Artistry by kenne

In the youth of spring

the river runs freely

between a cleavage —

two breasts flowering.

 

In the age of winter

the river runs dry

light between shadows

fainter, fainter, fainter —

as the fire burns out.

 
— kenne
 

Tanque Verde Wash Trail- Photo Essay   1 comment

Tanque Verde Wash Tail — Photo Essay by kenne
(Click On Any Image To See In A Slideshow Format

I have been walking the trails along the Tanque Verde Wash for over ten years,
taking many photos of the art and still have no idea who is the artist(s) —
for me, it’s a mystery.

— kenne

Morning Walk On The Tanque Verde Wash Trail   1 comment

Morning Walk On The Tanque Verde Wash Trail — HDR Image by kenne

“Direction is so much more important than speed.” Or said another way;
“Sometimes being low is the best way to reach your goal,
just think about what you may learn on the way.”

— kenne

Snake In The Tanque Verde Wash   1 comment

A Rock Art Snake In The Tanque Verde Wash — Images by kenne

The creative people living near the Tanque Verde wash keep doing their thing, this time in the wash rather than alongside the wash.
To create a rock art snake with rocks this size, the creator(s) would need to carry rocks from fifty or more yards away.
This rock art snake in the wash is located about a mile west of most of the art previously posted on this blog,
just east of the Craycroft Road bridge where the wash runs into the Rillito River.

— kenne

Cowpen Daisy Art — A Solo Gift   2 comments

Cowpen Daisy — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Last Thursday (May 5, 2021), I posted a photo of the lone wildflower (Cowpen Daisy) on a trail along the Tanque
Verde Wash between Sabino Canyon Road and Craycroft Road. Our community, Tanuri Ridge, is located north of the
wash, where I sometimes walk over four miles up and back along the wash. This is an art piece from the photo.

A good friend commented on the May 5th posting; “These solo gifts, especially, should be celebrated!” With this art posting, I celebrate it again.

— kenne

Tanque Verde Wash Art — Photo-Essay   4 comments

Tanque Verde Wash Art — Images by kenne

Cowpen Daisy   6 comments

Cowpen Daisy In Tanque Verde Wash (Tucson, Arizona) — Image by kenne

Morning walks along the wash

months have passed since water

flowed above ground down to the river.

A lone daisy takes on the odds

standing in the parched sand

having found the right place

to display its beauty.

— kenne

Migrating Turkey Vultures   2 comments

Migrating Turkey Vultures Near The Tanque Verde Wash — Fine Marker Drawing by kenne

They arrive each spring

Hundreds resting overnight

Morning departure.

— kenne

Trash In The Wash   Leave a comment

Trash in the Tanque Verde Wash — Image by kenne

Flash flood left behind

Trash in the Tanque Verde Wash

Not sustainable.

— kenne

Great Blue Heron In The Sonoran Desert   2 comments

A Great Blue Heron Atop a Neighbor’s House — Image by kenne

Flooded agricultural fields, riparian water ways, lakes and ponds throughout the Sonoran Desert are often visited by Great
Blue Herons. Large stature, long serpentine necks and crest feathers give this bird, especially in-flight, a prehistoric look.
The plumage is largely slatey gray-blue except for the head with is white with a wide, black stripes on the cap.
Just about any water or wetland dwelling animal that is small enough to swallow (and occasionally too large) will be
taken as prey. Like all herons, great blue’s use stealth with great striking speed to spear their prey below the water surface. 

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