Archive for the ‘Edward Hirsch’ Tag

Bee On Whitestem Blazingstar Wildflower   Leave a comment

Bee On Whitestem Blazingstar Wildflower (Mt. Lemmon) — Image by kenne

These first days of summer are like the pail
of blueberries that we poured out together
into the iron sink in the basement —

a brightness unleashed and spilling over
with tiny bell-shaped flowers, the windows
opened and the shrubs overwhelming the house

like the memory of a forgotten country, Nature,
with its wandering migrations and changing borders,
its thickets, woodlands, bee-humming meadows . . .

— from Summer Surprised Us by Edward Hirsch

Fall Colors — Mt. Lemmon   Leave a comment

October Colors on Mt. Lemmon — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Fall

Fall, falling, fallen. That’s the way the season
Changes its tense in the long-haired maples
That dot the road; the veiny hand-shaped leaves
Redden on their branches (in a fiery competition
With the final remaining cardinals) and then
Begin to sidle and float through the air, at last
Settling into colorful layers carpeting the ground.
At twilight the light, too, is layered in the trees
In a season of odd, dusky congruences—a scarlet tanager
And the odor of burning leaves, a golden retriever
Loping down the center of a wide street and the sun
Setting behind smoke-filled trees in the distance,
A gap opening up in the treetops and a bruised cloud
Blamelessly filling the space with purples. Everything
Changes and moves in the split second between summer’s
Sprawling past and winter’s hard revision, one moment
Pulling out of the station according to schedule,
Another moment arriving on the next platform. It
Happens almost like clockwork: the leaves drift away
From their branches and gather slowly at our feet,
Sliding over our ankles, and the season begins moving
Around us even as its colorful weather moves us,
Even as it pulls us into its dusty, twilit pockets.
And every year there is a brief, startling moment
When we pause in the middle of a long walk home and
Suddenly feel something invisible and weightless
Touching our shoulders, sweeping down from the air:
It is the autumn wind pressing against our bodies;
It is the changing light of fall falling on us.

— Edward Hirsch (from his 1986 book of poems, Wild  Gratitude)

Works of Art Imitate . . .   Leave a comment

Another Beautiful Sunset — Image by kenne

“Works of art imitate and provoke other works of art,
the process is the source of art itself.”

— Edward Hirsch

Desert Chicory And Bees   Leave a comment

Desert Chicory-72-2Desert Chicory and Bees — Images by kenne

Desert Chicory & Bees-72

These first days of summer are like the pail
of blueberries that we poured out together
into the iron sink in the basement—

a brightness unleashed and spilling over
with tiny bell-shaped flowers, the windows
opened and the shrubs overwhelming the house

like the memory of a forgotten country, Nature,
with its wandering migrations and hanging borders,
its thickets, woodlands, bee-humming meadows . . .

— from “Summer Surprised Us” by Edward Hirsh

Welcome Home   1 comment

Welcome-72-2.jpgWelcome Home– Image by kenne

And as I turn home where
I know you are already awake,
Wandering slowly through the house
Searching for me, I can suddenly
Hear my own footsteps crunching
The simple astonishing news
That we are here,
Yes, we are still here.

— from “Dawn Walk” by Edward Hirsch

 

Blackett’s Ridge Trail Sunset — Festive andFree-Floating   Leave a comment

Blacketts Sunset-Edit-2-72-2Blackett’s Ridge Trail Sunset — Photo-Artistry by kenne

It’s the way we move toward each other
at night, tired, giddy after a day together
or a day apart, flush with newborn plans

for a holiday from daily life, in reality.
We are festive and free-floating. We are
poured out like a bucket of wild berries.

— from “Summer Surprised Us” by Edward Hirsch

Mariposa Lilies   3 comments

Mariposa Lily-72Mariposa Lilies (Santa Catalina Mountains) — Image by kenne

Life has to have the plenitude of art.

— Edward Hirsch

The Truth   Leave a comment

Rose Lake July 2013Rose Lake, Santa Catalina Mountains — Digital Art by kenne

One imagines him as a prodigious morning walker
And a lonely metaphysician pausing in the park,

A rose rabbi, a sturdy man on a wide path
Dreaming of a sky washed clean by doubt.

One pictures him under the umbrella
Pines and buttonwoods on the way to work,

Imagination’s largest thinker conjuring up
Songs of human radiance twanging in the mist.

One thinks of him by the lake in a rain:
Mirrors on mirrors mirroring the emptiness.

— from At the Grave of Wallace Stevens by Edward Hirsch

 

 

“counter–love, original response”   Leave a comment

Log (1 of 1) contrast blog

“Live Covering Death” — Image by kenne

Now that I have more time to search for a source of inspiration larger than or outside of myself, I desire to generate creative expression my combining poetry and visual art. It is not always easy to tease out the imagination in words or a visual image, but when combined one may be able to create analogous worlds. Edward Hirsch, in Transforming Vision stated that this process is similar to what Robert Frost called “counter-love, original response.”

The Most of It

He thought he kept the universe alone;
For all the voice in answer he could wake
Was but the mocking echo of his own
From some tree–hidden cliff across the lake.
Some morning from the boulder–broken beach
He would cry out on life, that what it wants
Is not its own love back in copy speech,
But counter–love, original response.
And nothing ever came of what he cried
Unless it was the embodiment that crashed
In the cliff’s talus on the other side,
And then in the far distant water splashed,
But after a time allowed for it to swim,
Instead of proving human when it neared
And someone else additional to him,
As a great buck it powerfully appeared,
Pushing the crumpled water up ahead,
And landed pouring like a waterfall,
And stumbled through the rocks with horny tread,
And forced the underbrush—and that was all.

— Robert Frost

PS: I find inspiration in visual images, whether my own or that of others, from which I try to blend visual and verbal eloquence. One of the best examples of inspiration from visual art is Wallace Stevens “Man with the Blue Guitar” on Pablo Picasso’s “The Old Guitarist.”

 

It’s A Beautiful Day Painting   1 comment

Sunset (1 of 1) art II blog“It’s A Beautiful Day” — Computer Painting by kenne

“I woke up to voices speaking of love,
always leading me forward, leading me on,
taking me from the bedroom to the study
in the early morning or late at night,
emanations that seemed to come from night
itself, from leaves opening in the study
where many lives flow together as one
life, my own, these ventures in love.”

— Edward Hirsch

“We choose love over fear.”

Answers Lie Beyond The Open Windows And Doors   Leave a comment

Virginia City Buildings (1 of 1) grunge art II blog Windows And Doors — Grunge Art by kenne

(The Fortune-teller’s Words to the Poet)

The way downward is easy from Avernus.
Black Dis’s door stands open night and day.
But to retrace your steps to heaven’s air,

There is the trouble, there is the hard task.
And now he is wandering through a labyrinth
Of dead-end corridors and empty tunnels,

Broken mirrors and smudged signs pointing
Nowhere, voices echoing like footsteps
In the iron hallways. Listen to me:

If you want to become more than a shadow
Among shadows, you must carry back the memory
Of your father disintegrating in your arms,

You must bring words that will console others,
You must believe in stairs leading upward
To summer’s resplendent, celestial blues.”

— from the poem “Sortes Virgilianae” by Edward Hirsch

Capturing The Moment — 12/13/14 Sunset Images   4 comments

Sunset (1 of 1)_art 12-13-14Sunset, 12/13/14 — Computer Painting by kenne

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Sunset (1 of 1)-10 blog12/13/14 Sunset Images by kenne

At this hour the soul is like a yellow wing

slipping through the treetops, a little ecstatic

cloud hovering over the sidewalks, calling out

to the approaching night, Amaze me, amaze me,” . . .

— from “Poor Angels” by Edward Hirsch

Morning Passion   2 comments

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMorning Passion — Images by kenne

MORNING PASSION

Lorca’s mode of thought
The demon and the angel
Living the duende.

— kenne

Capturing The Moment — Stagecoach Driver   3 comments

Tombstone & Bisbee May 18 2012Stagecoach Driver — Image by kenne

Westward the wagon jolted
along the ruts and trails,
along the interminable course of empire,
while the sun took a long time going down in the fields.

The earth was slow and hard
and there was nothing to see but land:
it was not a country at all
but the sketch of a country,
the material out of which countries are made.

— from “Nebraska, 1883,” by Edward Hirsch

The dust of travel still clings to his body,
and particles of sunlight fade on his skin.
What has happened to the eternal presences?

— from “The Renunciation of Poetry,” by Edward Hirsch

 

Some Go Hunting For Light   6 comments

Lighthouse 2 blogEdward Hopper’s Lighthouse Village, Cape Elizabeth (1929)

Lighthouse 4 Hopper photo blog

Maine house, 1998, by Michael H. Coles

There is so much I love about the art of Edward Hopper, which is why I continue to turn to his work — so on the pulse of us as Americans. I have never been to Maine, let through painting like Lighthouse Village, I feel as if I grow up in Cape Elizabeth — his inspiration allows my imagination to capture reality.

“I once told Hopper that he shows us who we are,” said poet William Carlos Williams. “He’d have no part of my enthusiasm, or extravagance. ‘Yes, I try,’ he said–and then he spoke about ‘light,” how hard he looks for it. He told me to go ‘hunting’ for light, and I liked hearing him use that word–seeing his face get lit up as he spoke!” (“Seeking Maine’s Light,” DoubleTake, Winter 2000)

The Michael H. Coles photograph of a Maine house taken not far from where Hopper painted Lighthouse Village illustrates how Hopper was able to capture the light.

kenne

Edward Hopper, Self-portrait

Edward Hopper, Self-portrait

Edward Hopper and the House by the Railroad (1925)

by Edward Hirsch

Out here in the exact middle of the day,
This strange, gawky house has the expression
Of someone being stared at, someone holding
His breath underwater, hushed and expectant;

This house is ashamed of itself, ashamed
Of its fantastic mansard rooftop
And its pseudo-Gothic porch, ashamed
of its shoulders and large, awkward hands.

The_House_by_the_Railroad_by_Edward_Hopper_1925

The House by the Railroad by Edward Hopper 1925

But the man behind the easel is relentless.
He is as brutal as sunlight, and believes
The house must have done something horrible
To the people who once lived here

Because now it is so desperately empty,
It must have done something to the sky
Because the sky, too, is utterly vacant
And devoid of meaning. There are no

Trees or shrubs anywhere–the house
Must have done something against the earth.
All that is present is a single pair of tracks
Straightening into the distance. No trains pass.

Now the stranger returns to this place daily
Until the house begins to suspect
That the man, too, is desolate, desolate
And even ashamed. Soon the house starts

To stare frankly at the man. And somehow
The empty white canvas slowly takes on
The expression of someone who is unnerved,
Someone holding his breath underwater.

And then one day the man simply disappears.
He is a last afternoon shadow moving
Across the tracks, making its way
Through the vast, darkening fields.

This man will paint other abandoned mansions,
And faded cafeteria windows, and poorly lettered
Storefronts on the edges of small towns.
Always they will have this same expression,

The utterly naked look of someone
Being stared at, someone American and gawky.
Someone who is about to be left alone
Again, and can no longer stand it.

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