Archive for the ‘Creosote Bush’ Tag

Creosote Gall Midge   Leave a comment

SCVN Nature Walk 01-03-12__Creosote Gall Midge blogCreosote Gall Midge — Computer Art by kenne

The creosote gall midge is formed by a gall-inducing fly which inhabits creosote bush. The life cycle begins when the female oviposits into the part of the plant where she inserts her egg along with a fungal spore. A gall forms and the fungal mycelium grows to line the inside of the gall when the egg hatches the developing larva feeds upon the fungus.

 

Creosote Seed Pods — Grunge Art   2 comments

creosote Seed Pod (1 of 1) grange art blogCreosote Seed Pods — Grunge Art by kenne

Fuzzy-white seed pods

Decorate the creosote bush

A plant of the ages.

— kenne

 

What Do You Call A Group Of Saguaros?   1 comment

Saguaros (1 of 1) blogA Group of Saguaros Under Nurse Trees. — Image by kenne

The previous posting (100 Year-Old Cliff Dwellershowed a photograph of a giant saguaro cactus all alone on a steep cliff. Its location was unusual, but given that most saguaros start life under a bush, i.e., a creosote, or a tree, i.e., palo verde and mesquite, making its existence very impressive. Equally impressive is locating a group of saguaros protected by both mesquite and palo verde trees, which begged the question, “What do you call a group of saguaros?” Tribe? Legion? Family? Thicket? Grove? Clump? Gang? Clan? Bunch? Band? Coterie? Whatever, even researching the question didn’t give us an answer. So, for now, you can choose. Given the Tohono O’odham Nation, or Desert People’s cultural connection to the saguaro, I choose “tribe.”

kenne

Creosote Bush, November Blooms   Leave a comment

Creosote Bush (1 of 1) blog

Creosote Bush (1 of 1)-2 blogCreosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Blossoms in Sabino Canyon, November 10, 2014 — Images by kenne

One of the most common plants in Sabino Canyon is the creosote bush. Our neighbors south of the border cal the plant “gobernadora,” Spanish for “governess,” because of its ability to secure more water by inhibiting the growth of nearby plants. The plant exhibits a characteristic odor of creosote, and is the small inhabitants of the desert small after rain — the “smell of rain”. The bush normally blooms in the spring and summer, so the these new blossoms are a pleasant addition to the fall flowers in the Sonoran desert. Unlike most desert plants, the creosote bush has no thorns for defense, instead it is provided by a suite of toxic/ anti-feeding chemicals including the phenolic compound nordihydroguaiaretic acid. For more information, go to the Desert Botanical Garden website.

kenne

Creosote Bush (1 of 1)-3 blog

It’s A Tough Life   Leave a comment

Old Cactus (1 of 1)-2 Art_blog“It’s A Tough Life” — Image by kenne

The Good Fight

It is a tough life

In my second century

Giving the good fight.

— kenne

Capturing The Moment — Creosote Bush   Leave a comment

creosote bush (1 of 1) framed blogCreosote Bush — Image by kenne

Evergreen and Common,

The desert smell we love —

So bring on the rain.

— kenne

January Signs Of Spring In The Sonoran Desert   4 comments

Flower Creaso-9649 blogCreosote Bush

Saguaro Cactus-9683 blogMexican Poppy

Saguaro Cactus-9685 blogFairy Duster — Images by kenne

Desert Dances

Dormant desert awakes.

She drinks deep, stretches, sighs
exhales fragrant blossoms
on her warm, pregnant breath.
Her soft, supple sagebrushed
sparkling curves adorned with
splashes of pink, white phlox
and sprays of desert peach

invite you to tumble
down her snowy mountains
to abandon yourself
to wildflower wanders
to soothe in her hot springs
to rejoice in salty
waters of turquoise lakes.

Desert dances await.

— Gwendolyn Alley

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