Archive for the ‘Mission San Xavier del Bac’ Tag

The Right Place — The Secret Is Out!   2 comments

St XavierThe Right Place — Photo-Artistry by kenne

How will you know when
you are in the right place?
The secret is out!

. . . in a place where
each question
contains the answer.

You will know
that place
when you have
the right feeling —

The secret is out!
Or is it?

What to do
when the feeling
is missing?

. . . sadly,
your place

is not the right place.

kenne

Desert Mission Scene   3 comments

St XavierDesert Mission Scene — Digital Art by kenne

“We’re all just walking each other home.”

― Ram Dass

White Dove Of The Desert Computer Art   Leave a comment

baileys-visit-2011-04-16-san-xavier-mission-iii-blog-frameWhite Dove of the Desert (Mission San Xavier del Bac, First Poated April, 2011) — Computer Art by kenne

‘‘San Xavier del Bac, known as a rancheria since the seventeenth century, and as a mission since 1720 or 1732, was, in June, 1768, committed to the care of Padre Francisco Garces, who was its minister for eight or ten years, but whose successors are not named in any record that I have seen. The neophytes were scattered and had forgotten their doctrina, so it is said, but they consented to return if not compelled to work. Before the end of the year, the mission was destroyed by Apaches, who killed the native governor and captured two soldiers, the padre and most of the neophytes being absent at the time. In several subsequent raids, the mission livestock disappeared, but after 1772 lost ground was more than regained, though Padre Garces * * * was for a large part of the time, engaged in northern explorations. The official report of 1772 shows a population of 270 on the registers, and describes the church as moderately capacious, but poorly supplied with furniture and vestments. All the churches of Pimeria Alta at this period are described as of adobes, covered with wood, grass and earth. Arricivita, writing in 1791, mentions on one page that the Franciscans have built here adobe houses for the natives and walls for defense against the Apaches; but though specifying somewhat minutely the various churches that had been built or repaired, he says nothing of such work at Bac. In a similar statement on another page, however, he includes Bac, as well as Tucson, among the places where churches of brick had been built. Yet I think the chronicler would not have dismissed with so slight a notice the magnificent structure still standing at San Xavier, which has elicited many a description from modern visitors. The church is said to bear the date of 1797, which is presumably that of its completion. The building, or rebuilding, was probably begun soon after the date of the reports on which Arricivita based his work, and completed in the final decade of the century. * * * The establishment seems to have had no minister, and to have been practically abandoned from about 1828, though the Papago ex-neophytes are said to have cared for the building to some extent in later years.’’

This is the oldest mission in Arizona or California, and to-day stands as a monument to the industry and religious zeal and architectural skill of the early fathers. 

“Tucson, as we have seen, is first mentioned in 1763 as a rancheria visita of Bac, which had been for the most part abandoned. In the last years of Jesuit control, however, it had 331 Indians, more or less, under control of the missionaries. Reyes, in his report of 1772, describes San Jose de Tucson, as a visita of Bac, without church or padre’s house, on a fertile site where a large number of gentile and Christian Indians—not registered, but estimated at over 200 families—had congregated. Many of these seem to have been subsequently scattered; at least Anza found only eighty families of Pimas in 1774. Says Arricivita: ‘‘The Apaches have always sought to destroy a small rancheria at Tucson, it being the point of entry for their irruptions; but by the efforts of Padre Garces, there was built a pueblo, with a church, house for the padre, and a wall for defense, and it is to-day, a presidio of Spaniards.’’’’

From this it will be seen that Padre Garces made Tucson a walled town, it being the first and only walled city in the United States.

— from History of Arizona — Volume I

Mission San Xavier del Bac — Panorama Week, Day 4   Leave a comment

Green Mountain, Saguaro, MissionMission San Xavier del Bac, Tucson, Arizona — Image by kenne

 

Easter Along The Borderlands   1 comment

Spring Flower (1 of 1)-2 framed blogEaster Along the Borderlands — Image by kenne

When you’re at the mission
Sixty miles north of Nogales
And it’s Easter time too

It’s so easy to put on airs
At the place where
Father Kino drink the

Spring water that once was
Near the banks of the
Santa Cruz River.

On the first Friday after Easter
The Tohono O’odham of the
San Xavier Reservation

Conduct a candlelight parade
Just as the setting sun kisses
The white dove of the desert

Where she awaits the coming
of the
“Excellent Builder”
to complete the second tower.

 — kenne

We Scar The Things We Love   2 comments

Madera Canyon Panorama April 11, 2014 blog framedA Panorama View Down Through Madera Canyon In The Santa Rita Mountains South of Tucson, Arizona.
(Note the light color of mining tailings surrounding ponded water.)
— Image by kenne

We Scar The Things We Love

 

Always there is something worth trekking

in the Sonoran Desert.

Sometimes the treks start early in the morning,

driving across the Tucson basin over

occasional low water crossings and cattle guards

on narrow roads, stopping for big yellow buses.

 

A canyon road leads out of Green Valley,

a quite peaceful community

along the banks of the Santa Cruz River

covered with oaks and walnut trees

and a rich history with the Tumacacori Mission

to the south and San Xavier del Bac to the north.

 

Crossing one-lane bridges through a grassland bajada, 

the road climbs toward Madera Canyon

nestled between Mt. Wrightson and Mt. Hopkins

on the eastern slop of the Santa Rita Mountains,

forming one of the Sonoran desert’s Sky Islands,

an oasis above this bowl-shaped canyon.

 

Although some are called “Friends of Madera Canyon”

all visitors, be they hikers, birders, walkers,

or just those relaxing at one of the beautiful vistas

share a love of nature and being outdoors,

forming a friendship that helps bond 

memoirs of a shared love.

 

“All the while jumbled memories flirt out on their own,”

intruding on nature’s beautiful vistas

where a river once ran through, now shadowed

by a high wall of tailings surrounding a pond,

altering nature’s beautiful vistas above the canyon,

producing lasting scars to the sky above, the earth below.

 
— kenne
 

The Sonoran Desert’s White Dove   2 comments

Green Mountain, Saguaro, Mission

Green Mountain, Saguaro, Mission

Green Mountain, Saguaro, Mission

Green Mountain, Saguaro, MissionMission San Xavier del Bac — Images kenne

The White Dove Of The Desert

Imagine this:

Stranger
On horseback

Dark flowing rode
Moving in the breeze

Crossing
The desert southwest

Entering
The village of the

Desert people –
Tohono O’odham

Friendly people

Bonding
With the stranger –

Father Kino
Jesuit priest

Establishing
Third mission —

(Twenty-four total)

Upon which
The current church

Was built
Century later

Reflecting
Baroque architecture

Blossoming
In the desert blue sky

The White Dove
Of the Desert.

kenne

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