Archive for the ‘Lemmon Rock Lookout’ Tag

Hiking the Aspen Draw Loop   1 comment

Aspen Drew Hike 07-05-19-1-72The July 5th SCVN Friday Hikes began at the Sky Valley parking lot
where led guide Phil Bentley greeted everyone and covered the SCVN Safety Rules.
This was a six-mile loop connecting three trails, (Aspen Draw, Mt. Lemmon Trail,
and the Meadow Trail) with an elevation gain of 1,200 feet. 

Meadow Triail Hike 07-23-12One of the interest points on this hike was the Lemmon Rock Lookout staffed by the Forest Service personnel.

Meadow Triail Hike 07-23-12The original tower was erected in 1928.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-2-72On this day we were able to get a tour of the Lookout
since Phil called ahead and talked to the Forest Ranger on duty at the Lookout this summer.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-72.jpgThe Osborne Fire Finder.

Aspen Drew Hike Lemmon Rock Lookout-7-72.jpgView down into the Tucson Basin and the Santa Rita Mountains.

Aspen Drew Hike 07-05-19-Panorama-72After the tour, we took a snack break before continuing the hike.

Aspen Drew Hike-4-Phil-72A little music from our leader.

Aspen Drew Hike-3-72.jpg

Aspen Drew Hike-2-72

Lemmon Rock-Mark-IMG-4474-72Always a fun time hiking in the Santa Catalina Mountains. — Images by kenne

 

Mt. Lemmon Trail   1 comment

Lemmon Rock Lookout Tower-3183 blogMt. Lemmon Trail — Image by kenne

Each day I try to develop myself beyond the conventional level of existence. I transcend the light of being through threads of space and time allowing me to see truth in different reflections. Most people adopt on view for the sake of security. I prefer to use all views than to maintain artificial boundaries to have one view. By utilizing all views, I can know the truth in much the same way I come to know a butterfly, a wildflower. To do otherwise is to limit oneself to what is always true.

As I shift a point of view, I have the freedom to transcend any actuality which I may encounter. By doing so, I’m able to accept the freedom and responsibility of being human and become more authentic in my expression, therefore better able to actualize my existence. By being flexible in my point of view, I’m better able to include as much of reality as possible. 

— kenne

Anchored On The Rock   1 comment

Lemon Rock Lookout (1 of 1) art blog“Adrift on the Rock” — Image by kenne

Lemmon Rock Dreaming

Anchored on the rock

Looking afar for signals

Future turns apace.

— kenne

Capturing The Moment — Mt. Lemmon Watch Tower, Lemmon Rock Lookout   Leave a comment

Hiking (1 of 1)-15 Lemmon Rock Lookout blogLemmon Rock Lookout On Mt. Lemmon — Image by kenne

 “All Along The Watchtower”

“There must be some way out of here” said the joker to the thief
“There’s too much confusion”, I can’t get no relief
Businessmen, they drink my wine, plowmen dig my earth
None of them along the line know what any of it is worth.
 
“No reason to get excited”, the thief he kindly spoke
“There are many here among us who feel that life is but a joke
But you and I, we’ve been through that, and this is not our fate
So let us not talk falsely now, the hour is getting late”.
 
All along the watchtower, princes kept the view
While all the women came and went, barefoot servants, too.
Outside in the distance a wildcat did growl
Two riders were approaching, the wind began to howl.
 
— Bob Dylan

 

Hiking On Mt Lemmon In A Mountain Storm   2 comments

Yesterday, I lead the SCVN Friday hike on Mt. Lemmon. The hike was one I had recommended when the summer schedule was being built, which involved hiking several trails from the parking lot near the mountain top. Since the hike would begin at the top and go down to Marshall Gulch, it was necessary to do a car shuttle by first leaving a car at Marshall Gulch, then driving on up the Sky Valley road to the mountain top.

Lemmon Rock-Wilderness Rock (1 of 1)-5 Lookout blog framedLooking back up at Lemmon Rock Lookout

The hike began on a path next to the Trico electrical station, leading us to the Mt. Lemmon Trail, which we followed to the road leading to the Lemmon Rock Lookout. Just below the lookout is the Lemmon Rock trailhead. The trail is steep, dropping almost 2,00 feet over a distance of 2.3 miles, ending at the Wilderness Rock Trail.

Lemmon Rock-Wilderness Rock (1 of 1)-4 Lemmon Rock Trail blog framedView back up the mountain as we headed down the Lemmon Rock Trail

We began the hike from the top of the mountain in mostly sunny weather. By the time we reached the Wilderness Rock Trail, which is where we stopped for a snack, a few more clouds were gathering above the mountain. It was at this point on the Wilderness Rock Tail last year that we were caught in a storm as we headed back to Marshall Gulch. Then, as it was yesterday, the first half of the hike had only a few scattered clouds.

Lemmon Rock-Wilderness Rock (1 of 1)-3 Ann, Jeff, Janis, Barb blog framedAnn, Jeff, Joyce and Barb

As we set around having a snack and sharing conversation, those of us who were also on the Wilderness Rock hike last year began to noticed that the weather conditions were beginning to look quite similar to last year, so we decided to continue our hike on to Marshall Gulch. Just a last year, not long after continuing, we began to hear thunder with a few drops of rain falling.

Lemmon Rock-Wilderness Rock (1 of 1)-2Janis, Barb, Tim blog framedJoyce, Barb and Tim

The clouds got darker, followed by more thunder, lightening and rain, all of which continued for the remainder of the hike. I couldn’t help experiencing déjà vu thoughts and wondering if in some way I have been cursed by the mountain gods. 

kenne

Lemmon Rock-Wilderness Rock (1 of 1) Ken, Barb Tim blog framedKenne, Barb and Tim
iPhone Images by kenne

Hiking The Aspen Draw, Mt. Lemmon Trail And The Meadow Trail   5 comments

SCVN Friday Hike on Mt. Lemmon — Images by kenne (Click on any of the images to see slide show.)

6b41d7e0b974f08ab70e4e520531266fYesterday’s SCVN Friday Hike started at the Ski Valley parking lot where we took the Aspen Draw trail up to the top of the ski runs, then the Mt. Lemmon trail, looping back on the Meadow Trail. Combining these three trails gave us a six-mile hike with an elevation change of 1,200 feet. The hike included a stop of the Lemmon Rock Lookout.

The weather was great, so I was able to get a lot of photos, which I will be sharing, starting with the previous post and some others after this posting.

The SCVN summer hikes on Mt. Lemmon will conclude after the two remaining hikes (August 23 & 30). The SCVN lead hikes are part of our Public Interpretation program, which includes Walks, Hikes, and Demos, designed to help participants learn about and experience the wonders of Sabino Canyon, the Santa Catalina Mountains, and the Sonoran Desert. 

kenne

Rains Come Across The Mountains   Leave a comment

Prison Camp FireLooking northeast atop Mount Lemmon in the morning a clouds begin to build bringing rain to the Tucson area. Note how dry the plant in the foreground. The rain is much-needed. — Image by kenne

 

A Visit To The Lemmon Rock Lookout In The Catalina Mountains   4 comments

Lemmon Rock Outlook overlooking The University of Arizona Steward Observatory and a “control-burn” on Mt. Lemmon.

Lemmon Rock Lookout on Mt. Lemmon. The lookout cabin is about 15′ by 15′.

Hiking friend Jim with Gus.

View toward the Tucson valley with a Osborne Fire Finder mounted in the center of the cabin.

View east in the Catalinas toward the Rincon Mountains.

David Medford has been at the lookout since 2010. Here David takes a picture of a group visiting the lookout.

David, supervised by Gus, takes a group picture with the Tucson valley in the background.

View out of the southwest corner of the lookout cabin.

View from behind Osborne fire finder.

Images by kenne

The above plack reads: Lemmon Rock Lookout Tower was erected in 1928. It is the oldest lookout still in use on the Forest. This general locale has been used as a fire lookout since the Coronado Forest Reserve was established in 1902. The current lookout structure was constructed according to 1920’s standard plans. It contains a work area, kitchen, sleeping area, and fire finder in the same room. This lookout played a role in the first aerial fire patrols which flew over the Santa Catalinas beginning in 1921.

The earliest Forest Service fire towers were trees cleared of branches with a simple platform on the top. They were constructed in locales which provided an open view of the surrounding forest. The first wooden tower was built about 1915. Numerous wooden towers were erected during the 1920’s, along with the establishment of telephone lines for reporting fire conditions.

Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) enrollees stationed a camps on the Coronado National Forest during the 1930’s provided personnel for fire prevention work and additional fire tower construction. Architectural plans were developed throughout the Southwest Region for standard lookout towers made of wood and steel at this time. Few fire towers were built after World War II because of increasing dependence on air surveillance. Today, 50 permanent lookout towers remain on the forests of Arizona. Most are used seasonally, throughout the dry, windy spring and during the first rains of summer.

The Forest Service has always emphasized fire detection and suppression to protect the timber reserves. Fire guards patrolled on horseback or searched for fires from high vantage points in the early years of this century. Wildfires were suppressed as quickly as possible, although forester and conservationist Aldo Leopold, in a review of Southwest fire activities between 1919 and 1923, reported the beneficial effects of fire in maintaining pine forests and in brush control. The Forest Service now emphasizes prevention of fire damage rather than strict suppression. This, fire may enhance natural conditions and reduce fire hazards. Modern fire fighting equipment such as airplanes and fire retardants, sophisticated communication systems, and fire management plans help protect and maintain forest and range lands today. The lookout tower, used for almost a century, still plays a valuable role in protecting our forests resources.

This Lookout Tower is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Please help us protect it. 

******

When on Mt. Lemmon, visitors are encouraged to take the short hike down the Meadow Trail to the Lemmon Rock Lookout.

kenne

Lemmon Rock Lookout As Soon From The WIlderness Rocks Trail   5 comments

Looking up from the WIlderness Rocks Tail, the Lemmon Rock Lookout on Mt. Lemmon is barely visible through the trees.

Lemmon Rock Lookout.

Lemmon Rock Lookout.

Lemmon Rock Lookout. — Images by kenne

Lemmon Rock Lookout is at 8,820 feet and is usually occupied about five months per year for going on 80 years. The 14-by-14 shack was built by a CCC crew in the early 1930s, replacing an older lookout on Mount Lemmon that had stood since 1913. It has been upgraded since then, but remains much the same as it was 80 years ago. Click here for a blog link that contains images of the current accommodations.

kenne

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