Archive for the ‘Information’ Category

Mt. Lemmon Mushrooms   Leave a comment

Mt. Lemmon Mushrooms — HDR Image by kenne

out of the darkness

into the forest shadows

a new life in light

— kenne

Duskywing Butterfly — No Words   1 comment

Duskywing Butterfly — Image by kenne

Cholas In Traditional Finery   Leave a comment

A Cholas in traditional finery at the Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana located in the town of Copacabana,
Bolivia on the shores of Lake Titicaca. (August 24, 2019) 

— Image by kenne

Greater Roadrunner   Leave a comment

Greater Roadrunner (Sabino Canyon) — Image by kenne

The desert is human
endeavour’s most fitting graveyard;
 
the slow bleaching,
the gradual eroding into sand,
the heat stifling sound as it leaps into the air.
IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE. But it always does.
 
— from Roadrunners by André Naffis-Sahely

On The Shores of Lake Mescalero   Leave a comment

On The Shores of Lake Mescalero (Inn of the Mountain Gods, Mescalero, New Mexico) — Panorama Image by kenne

We were standing
Standing by peaceful waters
Standing by peaceful waters
Whoa, ah-oh, ah-oh
Whoa, ah-oh, ah-oh
 
Whoa, ah-oh, ah-oh
Peaceful waters
Standing by peaceful waters
Aah, baby
We gotta go now
 
— from Lake Marie by John Prine
 

Butterfly On Wooden Boat   Leave a comment

Butterfly On Wooden Boat — HDR Image by kenne

I dreamed I was a butterfly,

flitting around in the sky; then I awoke.

Now I wonder: Am I a man

who dreamt of being a butterfly,

or am I a butterfly

dreaming that I am a man?

— Chuang Tzu

Northern Mockingbird   1 comment

Northern Mockingbird in Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

One of the most familiar birds in the Sonoran Desert is the Northern Mockingbird. They hunt insects and spiders eat a wide variety of fruits;
berries of lantana and pyracantha are mainstays. Males and females have similar plumage: nearly uniform gray except for long dark tail
and white patch in open wing. Males are the singers that often practice all night long on a concatenation of bird songs borrowed
from a variety of other bird species. Three plants in particular produce fruit attractive to mocking birds: Desert Mistletoe,
Fremont Thornbush, and Desert Hackberry.

Punched in the Face by a Crow’s Perplexity by Catfish McDaris (HOW TO HEAL THE EARTH Series)   Leave a comment

The crow knows . . .

Silver Birch Press

crow-on-snowy-tree-branch-ohara-koson copyPunched in the Face by a Crow’s Perplexity
by Catfish McDaris

A bit of dirty snow, melted.
A giant crow watched me
from a telephone line that
marked the sky with talk.

When the bird took flight,
its wings were black blue.

I asked, “How can the earth
be healed?”

It replied, “The earth is
fine, it is humanity that is ill.”

PAINTING:Crow on Snowy Branch by Ohara Koson (1877-1945).

NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: I wrote this poem while thinking about the sad times we live in. All that needs to be done for our children and all the creatures of the Earth. I watched a crow looking at back at me through the snowy November air.

McDaris Photo 2 copyABOUT THE AUTHOR: Catfish McDaris won the Thelonius Monk Award in 2015. His 30 years of published material is in the Special Archives Collection at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Catfish…

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Posted November 17, 2021 by kenneturner in Information

Phainopepla Art   1 comment

Phainopepla — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Bird perched on a limb

A shadow against the sky

Art in black and white.

— kenne

Fall In The Sonoran Desert — No Words   Leave a comment

Fall In The Sonoran Desert — Image by kenne

Fire Above The Canyon   Leave a comment

The Big Horn Fire Above Sabino Canyon, June 2020 — Photo-Artistry by kenne

. . . In remembrance of last year’s Big Horn Fire in the Santa Catalina Mountains.

A Follow-up To November 13, 2021 Posting   1 comment

The November 13th posting, “Chevy Bel Air Taillight Art” took me back to a June 1, 2009 posting, “We Have Lost Another Piece of The Pie.”

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We Have Lost Another Piece of The Pie

“. . . bye-bye, Miss American Pie.
Drove my Chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys
were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, ‘this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.'”

In the Don McLean song, “American Pie,” he wrote about “the day the music died,” referencing the 1959 plane crash causing the deaths of Budd Holly, Ritchie Valens, and The Big Bopper. Now it’s the Chevy’s (GM) turn to test destiny.

These were also the days when “See the USA in your Chevrolet” rang through the head of many a young boy, such as I. The first car that made me aware that I was hooked on cars was my grandfather’s 1945 Chevy. My first car was a 1950 Chevy, followed by a 1953. Emotions are the makings of the human experience. What would life be without feelings, without passions, whether short-lived, or life-long?

A part of me has always been a “car guy,” struggling with the other me (like a marriage), resulting in an intense love affair to this day. As with all relationships, the thrill of driving is about closing the gap. Connecting with a car is not about becoming one but about maintaining identity while always seeking to close the gap. Even though the evidence that GM would file for bankruptcy has been apparent for some time, today’s formal filing still came as a shock. Chevy and GM will live on, but an age has died – another piece of the American pie. Now we are singing:

“. . . bye-bye, Miss American Pie
GM drove to the Feds
But the Feds exposed their lie.
And them good old boys were still
Drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“This’ll be the day that I die.”

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We Have Lost Another Piece of The Pie. As Michael Moore recently wrote, “It is with sad irony that the company which invented “planned obsolescence” — the decision to build cars that would fall apart after a few years so that the customer would then have to buy a new one — has now made itself obsolete.” For the “car guy” in me, I experienced a real blow to my psyche. The pragmatic me is saying, “it’s about time!”

The “car guy” would now like to share a couple of blog posts over the last couple of years:

Soul of a Car

Signs of age
Tell the story
Miles on the gauge
Count the glory

Now at rest
In the shade
Once the best
Of the fifties decade

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There is a key
Only to a past
Now rest free
At long last

A rusty door
A broken fan blade
Longing for more
Feeling only frayed

Having a heart
A few remaining horses
Seeking a start
From special forces

Old cars can rust
But never the soul
Covered with dust
Stuck in cruise control

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Moving On…

How do you measure the worth of a “driving machine?”
Miles? Miles per hour? Drive-ability? Reliability?
Attractiveness? Safety? Maybe all these.

But the real worth of the 318i that I bought, September 1983,
and sold, September 2007 can only be measured by those
intangibles by which we measure passion.

It is not my nature to dwell on the past, but parting with something
that was an extension of my very being was not easy. If there is one
image that reflects more than a third of my life, it was this little BMW.

…the road always calls.

— kenne

A Memphis Blues Club   Leave a comment

A Memphis Blues Club — Abstract Art by kenne

“I’m a bluesman moving through a blues-soaked America, a blues-soaked world, a planet where catastrophe and celebration-
joy and pain sit side by side. The blues started off in some field, some plantation, in some mind, in some imagination, in some heart.
The blues blew over to the next plantation, and then the next state. The blues went south to north, got electrified and even sanctified.
The blues got mixed up with jazz and gospel and rock and roll.”

— Cornel West

Great Blue Heron — Right Place, Right Time   1 comment

Great Blue Heron (East Park, Lake Houston –10-17-21) — Image by Hugh Poland

Great Blue Herons are the largest of the North American herons, standing tall over wetlands and shores of open water.
Great Blue Herons are blue-gray overall with a wide black stripe over their eye and a long yellow-orangish bill.
In flight their wings are two-toned with blueish forewings and black flight feathers, and their neck is usually coiled in,
unlike the similarly sized Sandhill Cranes.

 
Great Blue Herons are highly adaptable and can be found in marshes, swamps, shores, and tideflats. Some will even forage
in grasslands and agricultural fields. They have a general diet consisting of fish, frogs, salamanders, turtles, snakes, insects, rodents,
and even other birds. Great Blue Herons will stand or walk slowly through shallow water before quickly striking with their long bill,
grabbing small prey or impaling large fish. Great Blue Herons nest in colonies, and usually build nests high in the trees,
but will occasionally nest on the ground or in low shrubs.

Bryce Loschen (Houston Audubon)

Let’s Dance, Grandma   2 comments

“Let’s Dance, Grandma” — James and Joy (October 2, 2021)

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