Archive for the ‘Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum’ Tag

Night-blooming Cereus Fruit   Leave a comment

Night-blooming cereus-72.jpg

Night-blooming cereus-2-72Night-blooming Cereus Fruit (Sabino Canyon Recreational Area) — Images by kenne

“This unusual cactus has an aura of mystery about it, as it is rarely seen in the wild. Looking like dead creosote branches, it is not until it blooms that the Desert Night-blooming Cereus becomes obvious. Most of its mass is in a tuber below the ground. Twiggy finger-thick stems can grow up to 5’ long. Flowering happens at night, usually occur in June, and blooms are large, white, and fragrant. Golf ball size bright red fruit follow. This species occurs naturally in Arizona to Chihuahua, Zacatecas, and Sonora.”

— Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum 

    FLOWER of the moon!
Still white is her brow whom we worshiped on earth long ago;
Yea, purer than pearls in deep seas, and more virgin than snow.
The dull years veil their eyes from her shining, and vanish afraid,
Nor profane her with age—the immortal, nor dim her with shade.        

It is we are unworthy, we worldlings, to dwell in her ways;
We have broken her altars and silenced her voices of praise.
She hath hearkened to singing more silvern, seen raptures more bright;
To some planet more pure she hath fled on the wings of the night,—
    Flower of the moon!  

— from The Night-Blooming Cereus by Harriet Monroe

 

Anna’s Hummingbird   1 comment

Ken & Mary Visit -- Anna's Hummingbird-72.jpgAnna’s Hummingbird — Image by kenne

It started just now with a hummingbird
Hovering over the porch two yards away then gone,
It stopped me studying.
I saw the redwood post
Leaning in clod ground
Tangled in a bush of yellow flowers
Higher than my head, through which we push
Every time we came inside —
The shadow network of the sunshine
Through its vines. White-crowned sparrows
Made tremendous singings in the trees
The rooster down the valley crows and crows.
Jack Kerouac outside, behind my back
Reads the Diamond Sutra in the sun.

— from Migration of Birds by Gary Snyder

Juvenile Crested Caracara   1 comment

Crested Caracaras-art-72-2.jpgCrested Caracara – Juvenile (Arizona-Sonora Museum) — Photo-Artistry by kenne 

The crested caracara is related to the typical falcons but very different in shape and habits. This falcon has a strikingly patterned, broad-winged opportunist that often feeds on carrion. Because of its aggressive nature, it may chase vultures away from road kills. Juveniles are brown instead of black with a whitish neck and cheeks. In Arizona, they are only found near the Mexican border. “Caracara” comes from a South American Indian name, based on the bird’s call.

— kenne

Monarch Butterfly   Leave a comment

Ken & Mary Visit -- Monarch-art-72.jpgMonarch Butterfly — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Just living is not enough,”
said the butterfly,
“one must have sunshine,
freedom and a little flower.”

— Hans Christian Andersen

Rufous Hummingbird   1 comment

Ken & Mary Visit -- Rufous Hummingbird-72.jpgRufous Hummingbird, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum — Image by kenne

The wings of this adult make a high buzzy trill in flight.
The rufous is known for their extraordinary flight skills,
flying 2,000 mi during their migratory transits. 

— kenne

Gates Pass Area In The Tucson Mountains   1 comment

Tucson Mountains Panorama 3-blogGates Pass Area In The Tucson Mountains — Panorama by kenne (This panorama was created by merging three photos in Adobe Lightroom)

The road through the pass
is narrow with lots of curves
and no shoulders for the
many bikers going along the
crest of the Tucson Mountains.

Sunsets in the Sonoran Desert
at beautiful, especially when
viewed from Gates Pass after
spending the day at Old Tucson
or Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

— kenne

Great Horned Owl   Leave a comment

Great Horn Owl-1018 painting blogGreat Horned Owl at The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum — Computer Painting by kenne

You fly dark skies
Traveling the underworld
The soul of darkness.

— kenne

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