Archive for the ‘Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum’ Tag

Katelyn Spends The 4th Of July Holiday In Tucson   4 comments

Katelyn & Dave (1 of 1)-10 Art blog framed

Images by kenne (Click on any of the tiled imaged to see larger view in a slideshow format.)

Granddaughter Katelyn and son Kenne David left this morning, returning to Houston after four-plus days here in Tucson. This was their second visit after three years. We made an effort to do as much as possible in the desert summer and the beginning of the monsoon season, which began while they were here.

Photos of Katelyn and poetry about her have been part of several posting over the last ten years — she will be eleven this September. Here’s one of the poems:

The Eyes Tell You

Little girls have a mysterious power,
But not all can feel it – when she does,
You can see it in her eyes.

As she matures, she is driven
To climb the tower of perfection,
Always resisting her own indifference.

Her enigmatic power is needed
To stir the artist inside,
To triumph over the unenlightened.

In her own way, she will find something new,
Something never before encountered
Placing art in a world void of feeling.

Inventive, she will act,
Sometimes seeking out failure
In order to turn it into a triumph.

Once her power is transformed
By the magical virtue of art,
Loving and understanding becomes simpler.

# # # # #

Now that they return home, I ponder —

Children and grandchildren

are the beautiful mysteries

that drive our emotions 

stirring each moment we share,

not knowing if the same emotions

transcend each communication in the moment,

ending in emotional question marks.

kenne

Appalachian Mountain Club Hike Mt Wrightson In Madera Canyon   Leave a comment

Appalachian Mountain Club Hike Mt Wrightson In Madera Canyon — Images by kenne
(Click on any of the images to see larger view in slideshow format.)

This hike by the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) was their last in the Tucson area. We are pleased to have been able to hike with them and share our (SCVN) knowledge and experience of hiking the trails of southern Arizona.

This is the last in a series of postings on the AMC visit to the Sonoran Desert, so let’s remember for a moment . . .

Let’s remember for a moment,
the trail head gatherings,
the greetings, the smiles,
the joy of another hike.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the steep climbs, the switchbacks,
the majestic views at the top,
the masterful returns.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the trail fellowship,
sharing who we are
and common interests.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the pools near mountain trails,
resting tired feet in the cold water,
watching others jump in.

Let’s remember the moment,
the hike alone ridges of granite
and the juxtapositions of water-loving
and drought-tolerating plants.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the rich biodiversity of the Sonoran Desert
which the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum
illustrates through its ecological theater.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the images captured by
our mind’s eye,
lasting images to share.

Let’s remember for a moment,
that which we have added
to life’s experiences forming
a better understanding of self.

Let’s remember for a moment,
the desire, the drive to see 
what lies just over the next ridge,
on the other side of the mountain.

Let’s remember for a moment,
lots of mountains, few streams —
all dry this time of year, and my
turning back at the base of Old Baldy.

Let’s remember for a moment,
my friends from New England,
“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome,
dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.” *

— kenne

* Edward Abbey

Seven Dry Creek Crossings To Seven Falls   3 comments

One of the most popular hikes in the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area is the trail to Seven Falls in Bear Canyon. The trail to the falls crosses the Bear Canyon creek seven times (seven crossing to seven falls). Usually there is water in the creek, adding to the hiking adventure. 

Last Thursday, Ed Rawl, Jan Labiner and I hiked the trail from the Bear Canyon road entrance to the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area. Even after 19 inches of rain during the monsoon season (July, August, September), the creek is dry. There is some water at the falls, but it disappears underground once down in the canyon.

The now over eleven-year drought continues to impact the Sonoran Desert ecology. As pointed out in previous posting, invasive plants are competing for water in these drought conditions, i.e., fountain grass and buffelgrass. You can learn more about these and other invasive species at “Invaders“, a project of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

Seven Falls 01-27-12One Of The Bear Canyon Creek Crossings With Water Flowing, April, 2013 — Image by kenne

Hiking the Seven Falls Trail, October, 2013, No Water In The Creek (Click On Any Of The Tiled Photos For Larger Slideshow Image) — Images by kenne

Nature changes —

fall,

winter,

spring,

summer:

it’s not sudden

making goodbyes

intrinsic.

— kenne

Beauty And The Environment   Leave a comment

Fountaingrass and Buffelgrass In The Dry Creekbed of Sabino Creek — Image by kenne

If you Google “Fountaingrass,” you will find a lot of information on these attractive ornamental plants, such as where to buy, care, etc. However, these beautiful grasses are a threat to our environment. The spread of these invasive species create serious environmental problems. The web-site, INVADERS (Invaders of the Sonoran Desert Region a Product of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum) states: 

“Fountaingrass (and bufflegrass) is a large grass that produces lots of seeds that spreads rapidly from cultivation into nearby disturbed areas, and eventually into natural habitats. It often forms dense stands and aggressively competes with native species, especially perennial grasses and seasonal annuals, for space, water, and nutrients, and is most common in riparian habitats within paloverde-saguaro desertscrub in the Arizona Upland Sonoran Desert.”

Alberto Búrquez MontÍjo has stated, “We know … that the replacement of Sonoran Desert plants by buffelgrass means a large loss of species, so large that 90 of every 100 species disappear in dense buffelgrass stands. …”

These invasive grasses from Africa and the Middle East have created severe fire hazards to the Sonoran Desert, especially for saguaros and other cacti who have a low tolerance for fire. “Once these plants have been killed by fire, it takes many years for new ones to mature. The grasses, on the other hand, are fire-adapted and come back robustly with the next rain.”

In the desert, it is important to grow native — don’t plant a pest! Let nature create its own beautiful environment. Often, man’s good intentions have a way of backfiring. 

kenne

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