Archive for the ‘SCVN’ Tag

Jim Martin, In Loving Memory Of A Great Naturalist   1 comment

Jim and B.J. Martin-Edit-1-72.jpgJim and B.J. Martin, May 7, 2018 , were honored by achieving Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist (SCVN) Emeritus Status.
— Image by kenne

I went to another funeral today, something I began doing at an early age while living with my grandparents. Old people’s friends die. Back then I didn’t always know the people and spent my time running around the graveyard across the road from the church with other children, in a small northeast Alabama rural town.

It’s different today being one of the old people whose friends are dying. When I became an SCVN member in 2011, Jim Martin had been an active member for 23 years, teaching elementary school children about nature and conservation, leading and participating in SCVN  hikes, and serving a treasurer, VP, and President of SCVN. I first met Jim on one of the SCVN Friday Hikes. He was an 82-year-old active hiker, a quiet, pleasant guy to be around — always smiling! 

Jim pasted away at the age of 90, July 16, 2019.

— kenne

 

 

Hiking The Box Camp Trail — A Photo-Essay Adventure   2 comments

Box Camp Hike-2-72Tim, our lead Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist guide went over the safety rules for the day’s hike.

Box Camp Hike-3-72A short distance into hiking the Box Camp Trail, we stop to take in one of the many views.

Box Camp Hike-5-72The trail leads us through ferns and tall pines.

Box Camp Hike-6-72This section of the trail is a rolling downhill path continuing through the tall trees.

Box Camp Hike-7-72.jpgAs the trail continues down the mountainside the pine forest opens to a thick oak growth.

Box Camp Hike-8-72The trail becomes steeper and difficult to follow through the thick overgrowth. 

Box Camp Hike-9-72Looking down over the oak overgrowth you can see Sabino Canyon and Thimble Peak.

Box Camp Hike-11-72The Box Canyon Trail leads down to East Fork Trail, which runs into Sabino Canyon Trail.

Box Camp Hike-12-72However, this rock lookout is where we had planned to rest
and have a sneak before starting the hike 2.5
miles back up the mountain, which has an elevation change of 1,200 feet.
Before starting back we realized our tail-guide, Jeff, was not with us.
Long story short, he had taken a wrong turn in the area where the trail had a lot of over growth.
We started back using the radios to communicate with Jeff, which were spotty at best. 

Box Camp Hike-14-72Even though having hiked the trail many times, the climb back to the trailhead was a real challenge.
I had to really slow my pace with only Sharon behind me
having taken over for the trail-guide task for Jeff.
We soon caught up with the lead group, only because Tim,
our lead-guide was also having some issues,
so Ellen took over as lead. After resting and with the help of GU energy gel
Tim and I were able to continue on.
(The fact that we happen to be the two oldest hikers on the hike had nothing to do with our struggles.) 

Box Camp Hike-15-72.jpgMeanwhile, we continued trying to locate Jeff.  Before returning back to the trailhead,
with radio contact we were able to determine that Jeff was somewhere back on the trail and okay.
Back at the trailhead we kept waiting and he finally showed up as pictured above.
To say the least, the circumstances made for a very interesting hike. — Images by kenne

 

Keeping Alive A Sense Of Wonder   3 comments

SCVN SIR-72Panning for Garnets in Sabino Creek — Image by kenne

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder . . .
he [or she] needs the companionship of at least one adult
who can share it, rediscovering the joy, excitement, and
mystery of the world we live in.”

— Rachel Carson

 

Naturalist Bruce Garrett, May He Rest In Peace   8 comments

Gneiss WalkBruce Garrett with His Talking Stick, Standing On A Gneiss Rock — Image by kenne

Most of this decade SCVN member Bruce Garrett led a geology walk, called “Gneiss Walk” in the Sabino Canyon Recreational Area. It has been a very popular walk, not only because he was very knowledgeable but because he was very entertaining. He loved talking to people.

Bruce will be dearly missed by all who had an opportunity to walk with him in Sabino Canyon and learn about the geology of the Santa Catalina Mountains. 

— kenne

Gneiss WalkKenne, Bryna, and Bruce in Sabino Canyon

 

King Canyon Trail To Wasson Peak, Revisited   1 comment

A couple of weeks ago some of us did our annual King Canyon trail hike to observe the wildflowers, which in the past was part of our hike on up to Wasson Peak. However, this year the plan was not to go all the way to the Peak. I hate to admit it, but time is beginning to catch up with us. So, the best I can do is to revisit a posting from six years ago. My days of cheating time might be running out.

— kenne

King Canyon To Wasson Peak

Kings Canyon Trail — Images by kenne

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Wildflower Slideshow by kenne

King Canyon To Wasson Peak

Panorama of Wasson Peak Near The Top

SCVN guided hike to Wasson Peak via Kings Canyon trail, which is about a seven mile (roundtrip) hike and elevation gain of 1,900 ft.
Some of our hikers made only the Kings Canyon trail to the first saddle since we were experiencing unusually warm record-setting temperatures (the mid-90’s).

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people
are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home;
that wilderness is a necessity…”
― John Muir

Hiking The Sweetwater Trail   Leave a comment

Sweetwater Trail Panorama-72Panorama of the Santa Catalina Mountains from the Sweetwater Trail in the Tucson Mountains (March 15, 2019)
— Images by kenne

SCVN members and guests hiked the Sweetwater Trail
Friday, March 15, 2019, on a beautiful spring day.
As has been the case for a couple of weeks,
wildflowers are blooming everywhere
with a background of wispy white clouds
on a canvas of blue. 

— kenne

A Hummingbird’s Nest   Leave a comment

The Shutdown Hasn’t Stop Volunteers from Providing Services In Sabino Canyon   2 comments

ed-72

Sabino Canyon Recreational Area in the Coronado National Forest
has been impacted by the government shutdown
yet remains open to the public with 
the help of volunteer organizations,
Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) 
and the Santa Catalina Volunteer Patrol (SCVP)
continuing to provide their services to the public.

bob veranes-72

One of the programs provided by the SCVN is daily
environmental education programs for k-6 students.

Each August teachers reserved a date to bring their class
to the Canyon starting in October.

debbie bird-72

Because of the shutdown, the Forest Service agreed
to make sure all trash is removed and 
the restrooms are clean
in the areas where the environmental education programs are taking place.

jeff hahn-72

Teachers select from six programs designed to meet “core curriculum” goals.

Jan Labiner-72.jpgImages by kenne

This past Thursday’s program was “Back To the Past.”
Students learned
about the nature Americans
who lived in Sabino Canyon hundreds of years ago.

— kenne

“Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth
who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience,
and just plain loving one another.”

– Erma Bombeck

2019 Packathon Feeding Tucson’s “Hunger Community”   1 comment

packathon-722019 Packathon at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Tucson (January 6, 2019) — Image by kenne

Thirty SCVN members and spouses were among 400 people Sunday
packing breakfast meals to feed 50,000 people in Tucson’s
“hunger community” in less than one 1 1/2 hours.
This was the seventh year of the Packathon organized by St. Paul’s MC
and the 2nd year Joy and me participated.  This is an all-inspiring event. 

— kenne

Closer to home   2 comments

I spent some time this morning with eight sixth grader students in Sabino Canyon. The nature class was the “Web of Life” where I lead a nature walk and table activity on how we are all connected and therefore dependent on our being able to maintain an ecological balance in our world. When I got home I had an email on this WordPress posting — a perfect continuation on what I had been sharing with the students.

via Closer to home

Learning   1 comment

April 2018 Trip (31 of 133)I have learned a lot from my hiking friends. — Image by kenne

Learning is all about connections,
and through our connections with unique people,
we are able to gain a true understanding
of the world around us.

— Peter Senge

A Lesson On Correcly Identifying Monarch, Queen and Viceroy Butterflies   Leave a comment

The Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) have been preparing a new kit for Elementary School Program, which will be on pollinators. I was asked to provide some photos of pollinators. One of the photos first appeared on this blog in a grunge art piece I did in September of 2015, which I mistakenly identified as a viceroy.

Viceroy Butterfly on Buttonbush (1 of 1)-3 blog

One of the Pollinators kit developers is SCVN member Fred Heath, whom we consider our butterfly expert. Fred let me know that I had misidentified the butterfly —

“The orange and black butterfly is a Queen and not a Viceroy.
As you probably know, the Viceroy is a mimic of the Monarch and Queen.
In the east where there are more Monarchs than Queens,
the Viceroy is a brighter orange. Out west and in the south where there are more
Queens than Monarchs the Viceroy is more of a burnt orange like the Queen.
The one quick way to distinguish between the Queen and the Viceroy,
that that the Viceroy has a black median band,
which goes across the hindwing and the Queen doesn’t have that band.

This mistake is made a lot. There was a billboard that advertised Mexico and the Monarchs,
but the butterfly in the billboard is a Viceroy.
When I google Viceroy, the first picture they show is a Monarch.” 

Monarch, Viceroy, Queen image001Fred Heath Slide for One of His Butterfly Presentations

 

Douglas Spring Trail   Leave a comment

Douglass Spring-6346. blogHiking Douglas Spring Trail — Image by kenne

Tomorrow’s Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) Friday hike will be on the Douglas Spring Trail in the Rincon Mountains. For the first time in several years, I will not be participating. I will miss being on this hike.

A flat start into the morning sun
Hikers leaving behind long shadows
On a trail that will soon disappear 
As we start our climb in
The mountain’s shadow, stopping
Only to watch things themselves
Letting the sun and earth
Go about their changes.

— kenne

Biomes Of The Santa Catalina Mountains   5 comments

October 7th, SCVN naturalist David Dean conducted an advanced training tour of the Biomes of the Santa Catalina Mountains.

Biomes of the CatalinasWe began the tour by meeting at the McDonald’s at Catalina Highway where David provided an overview of the biomes of the Catalinas. Before starting the car caravan up Catalina Highway, David covered the lower biomes, the Saguaro-Palo Verde (100′ – 4,000′), which includes the dominant cacti and legume trees; the Desert Grassland (3,800″ – 5,000′) with grasses, succulents & shrubs being dominant.  

Biomes of the CatalinasAt about the 5.5-mile marker, we pulled off at Molino Basin where David lead a discussion on the Oak – Grassland biome (4,000′ – 5,600′) and Oak Woodland (5,000′ – 6,000′) biome. Here he used posters and the natural taurine to cover; Trees: Emory Oak, Mexican Blue Oak, Silverleaf Oak, Arizona White Oak, Alligator Juniper, Western Soapberry, Border Pinyon Pine: Shrubs: Mountain Yucca, Soap-Tree Yucca, Shindagger Agave, Sotol, Golden-flowered Agave, Beargrass; Grasses: AZ Panic Grass, Blue Grama, Sideoats Grama, Cane beard grass, Spidergrass, Bush Muhly, Bull Grass, Lehmann Lovegrass; Oak – Grassland: Oaks & Junipers, Chihuahua Pine, Buckbrush, Golden-flowered Agave, Mt. Yucca.

Biomes of the CatalinasOur next stop was along the highway near Bear Creek to discuss the Riparian Corridor (Not a biome) where we found AZ Sycamore, AZ Walnut, Gooding Willow, Fremont Cottonwood, Velvet Ash, AZ Cypress, AZ Alder.

Biomes of the CatalinasAt the approximately the 5,400″ elevation we stopped at the Middle Bear Picnic/Green Mountain Trail Head to learn about Pine-Oak Woodland biome where the dominant plants are AZ Pine, Chihuahua Pine Silverleaf Oak, AZ White Oak, Emory Oak, Black Cherry, Alligator Juniper.

Biomes of the CatalinasNext, we stopped at Windy Point Vesta(6,500′), a popular place for tourists driving up the scenic Catalina Highway. At this location, David talked about the Chaparral biome, which includes Silver Oak, AZ Madrone, Border Pinyon Pine, Alligator Juniper, Manzanita, Golden-flowered Agave, Beargrass, and Buckbrush.

Biomes of the CatalinasAt the 19.3-mile highway marker (7,825′), David leads a discussion on the Pine Forest biome where the dominant plants are  AZ Pine, SW White Pine, Ponderosa Pine and occasional Douglas-Fir.

Biomes of the CatalinasAs you can see, David used live plant specimens on his posters.

Biomes of the CatalinasEver wonder how Mt. Lemmon got its name? The highest point in the Santa Catalina Mountains (9,152′) was named after Sara Plummer Lemmon, a respected botanist from New Gloucester, Maine, who arrived in Arizona after living in coastal California. Her Arizona fate was sealed when she attended a botany lecture in 1876 led by her future husband, John Gill Lemmon, and the whirlwind romance was on. After four years of courtship, the two wed and worked together cataloging the flora of the West, which would lead them to the Coronado National Forest in the southern section of what was then the Arizona Territory.

Biomes of the CatalinasA discussion on the last biome in our tour, Mixed Conifer Forest (Above 8,000′) took place at Bear Wallow (8,100). Here David illustrated the common plants in the Mixed Conifer Forest: Ponderosa Pine, AZ Pine, SW White Pine, Douglas-Fir, White Fir, Quaking Aspen; Silverleaf, Netleaf, and Gambel Oaks; Rocky Mountain, Big Tooth, and Box Elder Maples.

In hindsight, I wish I had done both photography and video of the biomes tour. Near the end of the tour, I did think about doing a video clip, which is what follows.

Note: Much of the copy in this posting is from David Dean’s handout, Biomes of the Santa Catalina Mountains

 

 

 

Learning About Nature Is Fun!   2 comments

Park Ranger and Kid-0108 blogPark Ranger and Kid at Mesa Verde National Park — Image by kenne

During our recent visit to Mesa Verde National Park, I watched a Park Ranger at a demo table doing something we as naturalists do at Sabino Canyon to education visitors to the canyon — couldn’t pass up taking a photo and watching the child’s reaction.

Wild for the Wilderness (1 of 1)-67-2 blogSabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalist at Sabino Canyon — Image by kenne

Sabino Canyon Volunteer Naturalists (SCVN) programs and nature demonstrations start in October.

— kenne

“Children the world over have a right to a childhood filled with beauty, joy, adventure, and companionship.
They will grow toward ecological literacy if the soil they are nurtured in is rich with experience, love, and good examples.”

— Alan Dyer

 

 

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