Archive for the ‘Tucson Arizona’ Category

Sunset Near Tanque Verde Wash   1 comment

Sunset Near Tanque Verde Wash (09/15/11) — Image by kenne

Such a beautiful tree —
so representative of life.
Yet, we often see beauty only
in the foliage and blossoms
nature provides in one of life’s stages.
Why?

Beauty is everywhere —
there is beauty in death,
marking the stage so important
in the cycles of life.

This tree (image of) is amazing,
a sculpture in the face of the sun,
containing the shapes we use
to design our places in this world.

What image do you present
in the face of the sun?
Does it add?
Does it subtract?

Be honest!

— kenne

A Summer Of Fire   Leave a comment

Yesterday’s Sunset from Off Our Patio — Image by kenne

Some of the wildfires in the west began with the Bighorn Fire here in the Santa Catalina Mountains back in June.
Since then fires have continued to ravage the west. Sadly, all the climate models have projected data
predicting the conditions for a perfect storm.

Meanwhile, there are currently five storms in the Atlantic. It’s time to
stop climate-denial or conspiracy thinking and believe in science. 
Pease, let’s not let politics win out over science.

— kenne    

Before The Fire   2 comments

Mt. Lemmon, San Pedro Valley Vista Before the Big Horn Fire — Image by kenne

“You can’t divide the country up into sections and have one rule for one section
and one rule for another, and you can’t encourage people’s prejudices.
You have to appeal to people’s best instincts, not their worst ones.
You may win an election or so by doing the other,
but it does a lot of harm to the country.”

— Jon Meacham, The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels

A Clear Midnight   2 comments

A Full Moon Night In The Sonoran Desert — Photo-Artistry by kenne

A Clear Midnight

This is thy hour O Soul, thy free flight into the wordless,
Away from books, away from art, the day erased, the lesson done,
Thee fully forth emerging, silent, gazing, pondering the themes thou lovest best.
Night, sleep, death and the stars.

— Walt Whitman

Waste Land   Leave a comment

Waste Land — Image by kenne

The Waste Land: Five Limericks

I

In April one seldom feels cheerful;
Dry stones, sun and dust make me fearful;
Clairvoyantes distress me,
Commuters depress me–
Met Stetson and gave him an earful.

II

She sat on a mighty fine chair,
Sparks flew as she tidied her hair;
She asks many questions,
I make few suggestions–
Bad as Albert and Lil–what a pair!

III

The Thames runs, bones rattle, rats creep;
Tiresias fancies a peep–
A typist is laid,
A record is played–
Wei la la. After this it gets deep.

IV

A Phoenician named Phlebas forgot
About birds and his business–the lot,
Which is no surprise,
Since he’d met his demise
And been left in the ocean to rot.

V

No water. Dry rocks and dry throats,
Then thunder, a shower of quotes
From the Sanskrit and Dante.
Da. Damyata. Shantih.
I hope you’ll make sense of the notes.

— Wendy Cope

(The author was inspired by T. S. Eliot’s, The Waste Land.)

 

The Tucson Mountains — Truth Never Dies   2 comments

Tucson Mountains — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Truth Never Dies

Truth never dies. The ages come and go.
    The mountains wear away, the stars retire.
Destruction lays earth’s mighty cities low;
    And empires, states and dynasties expire;
But caught and handed onward by the wise,
    Truth never dies.

Though unreceived and scoffed at through the years,
    Though made the butt of ridicule and jest,
Though held aloft for mockery and jeers,
    Denied by those of transient power possessed,
Insulted by the insolence of lies,
    Truth never dies.

It answers not. It does not take offense,
    But with a mighty silence bides its time.
As some great cliff that braves the elements
    And lifts through all the storms its head sublime,
It ever stands, uplifted by the wise,
    And never dies.

As rests the Sphinx amid Egyptian sands;
    As looms on high the snowy peak and crest;
As firm and patient as Gibraltar stands,
    So truth, unwearied, waits the era blest
When men shall turn to it with great surprise.
    Truth never dies.

— Anonymous

First Time In Awhile   3 comments

Jim and John Walking to the Broadway Trailhead In Saguaro National Park. — Images by kenne

Yesterday morning and this morning, it’s been cool enough to consider hiking in the desert.
So, when Tom called yesterday and asked me to go hiking, I felt a rush of energy pinned up since the spring.
Normally the hot desert days drive us up to Mt. Lemmon to hit the mountain trails.
However, this summer, the trails have been closed because of the Big Horn Fire.
So, this morning Jim, John, Tom, and I met at the usual meeting place outside the Bear Canyon branch
of the Pima County Library to mask-up and carpool to one of the many park trailheads.

Here in Tucson, we are not currently experiencing the orange sky the forest fires have created in California.
But, we have a haze covered sky coming from the many fires in the western states, making it easy to look directly at the sun.

Signs of our prolonged drought are everywhere. Even normally, drought-resistant plants are struggling.

We spent about 2 1/2 hours hiking various trails and washes in the Park. My friends have been hiking
these trails much longer than I, and if you are wondering, I’m the youngest of us.

HAPPY FEET!

Tree By The Tanque Verde Wash   2 comments

Tree by the Tanque Verde Wash — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“Whatever you hold in your mind will tend to occur in your life.
If you continue to believe as you have always believed,
you will continue to act as you have always acted.
If you continue to act as you have always acted,
you will continue to receive what you have always received.
If you want different results in your life or your work,
all you have to do is change your mind.”

— Unknown

Hummingbird Art   2 comments

Hummingbird Art — Photo-Artistry by kenne

“The two worst tactical errors you can make
are acting too early
and allowing an opportunity to slip by.”

— Paulo Coelho

 

The Cover Of My Body   1 comment

Relaxing After A Hike — Photo-Artistry by kenne

 

“Ginger and Sorrow”

My skin is the cover of my body.
It keeps me bound to my surroundings.
It is the leather over my spine.
It is the silk over the corneas of my eyes.
Where I am hairless, at the lips and groin,
there is pinkness and vulnerability.
Despite a protective covering of horny skin,
there is no such problem with my fingers,
whose ridges and grooves are so gratifying
to both the lover and the criminologist.
I think perhaps the entire history
of me is here—viper of memory,
stab of regret, red light of oblivion.
Hell would be living without them.

— Henri Cole

 

Lemmon Rock Lookout   2 comments

Lemmon Rock Lookout — Photo-Artistry by kenne

There’s a lookout on a rock
That’s called, Lemmon Rock.

Placed on the side of Mt. Lemmon
Where a ranger with his dog

Watch over the Catalina’s.
Listening to echoes of liance.

Fires have come close
But never close for cause 

To abandoned the watch
Tracking the forest’s future

Thinking about a poem
They will never write.

— kenne

 

Oak Tree Gall   Leave a comment

Oak Tree Gall — Image by kenne

“If you cannot trust yourself,
you cannot even trust your mistrust of yourself –
so that without this underlying trust in the whole system
of nature you are simply paralyzed.”

— Alan W. Watts

Don’t Get A Stupid Driver Fine   4 comments

A Flash Flood From The Past (09/08/14) — Image by kenne

Where we live, flash floods 
are common during late summer,
but not this summer of little rain.

We live off of River Road,
a two-lane desert road
with low-water crossings.

Driving in a monsoon storm
requires extra vigilance in a
state with a stupid driver law.

— kenne

Death Comes On The Rocks   2 comments

Death Comes On The Rocks — Image by kenne

They lay on the rocks

Dead pines humming in the wind

High on the mountains.

— kenne

Bur Marigold Wildflower   Leave a comment

Bur Marigold Wildflower (Bidens aurea) Blooms in September and October
in the Santa Catalina Mountains — Photo-Artistry by kenne

Considered the most spectacular of the genus Bidens,
the Bur marigold is not a very common plant.
“Bidens” means “having two teeth,” which references
the hairlike appendages on the fruits.
A deciduous perennial forb.

— Frank S. Rose

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